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Thread: Getting Started Shooting at 1000 Yards

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jwknutson17 View Post
    I started off the longer range game with a 350 dollar remington 30-06 with a Bushnell elite 3200 scope with a SFP multi-x reticle. I quickly found a mil dot reticle optic but it was still SFP. I shot that for a long wile before upgrading to anything else. Shot for months at 600 before really going farther. Just learning what my rifle did and how wind affected my shots. A chrono and a good ballistic app really do a lot for you. Practice at 600 really, really helped me make hits at 8-1k and beyond. Or practice at 300-400 helped me make hits at 6. I think just time behind the gun, and not just throwing rounds at 1k for the sake of it, will benefit you greatly. I almost always shoot steel for instant feedback. Working my way up in distance keeps me from getting frustrated too. Just trying to go right to distance you can be sending 10 rounds down range without a hit and that gets old fast. Getting some hits at 3,5,7, etc first can really help. Then you will get the confidence to send one at 1k with good data and make first round hits. You will see how much you learn just getting time behind the rifle... Way more then any book or tool can tell you.
    I agree with Jake and Mark here, solid post. I have more times than I would like to admit, "Im going to pop the 1,300 before the wind kicks up". Then find out the 100 yard zero is way off for some reason. Checking your zero is huge before you go out for the long shot especially when you banging guns together in safes and trucks and ... working your way up isa good plan.
    "Air Force / Policeman / Fireman / Man of God / Friend of mine / R.I.P. Steve Lamy"

  2. #62
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    Tons of great info already here. I will just add this: while a 20moa base is nice, it’s not totally necessary. Just about any .308 will get to 1000 yds in 11.5-11.7 mils, give or take. Even my little NF 2.5-10X24 has that in it adjustment wise. So, YES, I would always go for the 20moa base, don’t let that stop you if you don’t have it yet.
    I pretty regularly hit 1000yds with my KAC ACC 16” shooting Federal GMM 185 Berger’s. SUPER doable.

  3. #63
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    6.5-.308

    The debate always seems to come up and one has to think about what they are going to do with the gun. Do some unbiased research and let the math and science guide you in regards to the wind effect. There's always the science and art of shooting, understanding and applying the information is key, one without the other doesn't work well.

    When you compare, don't do things such as a 16" .308 and a 26" CM or the opposite to get the numbers you want. Obviously two things we have to consider, wind and drop. Drop is easy on a square range, known distance, get to an unknown and ranging errors will favor the more efficient round. Calculators will show the danger space of each at selected ranges so you can see for yourself.
    Wind, we all know that this is the killer. You have to effectively read it, the variables along the flight and also use the science as a base to apply the formula. A suggestion is to go by what a calculator states for both calibers, see what the wind is and also calculate what effect the error on reading the wind has.
    The 6.5 is more forgiving in regards to wind errors and also drop. The science is there folks, a skilled shooter will perform better with the 6 or 6.5 class.

    Now we have to revisit a couple things-distance normally shot and need. Other than maybe a slight recoil reduction, if you are at medium ranges, 3.08, 6, 6.5, get whatever you want, go out further, I would run the 6/6.5's. If all I had was short ranges, I would stick with a .223.
    An example of calibers and skill, friend of mine, we are both equal skilled in "long range" He runs a .308 or a .300WM, both custom bolts. I run an AIAT in 6.5CM-of since I have a good supply, I still run the 140 AMAX-they fall apart you know--
    We are at 2-6 points down at 1000 when he runs the 300WM, one or the other within 1-2 points of each other. If he runs the .308, he's 8-12 down. When I ran the one .308, I had a custom but some serious non custom ammo-I was thumping some 185 Bergers pretty hard in a GAP built Winchester and would come close to the CM but had some ass to the recoil. They were cruising at 2750-an example of an "unfair" comparison.

    Taking it a step further, we are punching paper and not delivering a payload. I'm trying to sway him to the 6.5 to have a major recoil and cost reduction. Now if we had to deliver a payload, yeah, 300WM smackdown.

    Bottom line-get what you want after all of that and practice with it.
    GET IN YOUR BUBBLE!

  4. #64
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    I would heartily recommend the ELD-M bullets, as they are designed for long range shooting, rather than the ELD-X bullets, which are intended for hunting...

    Best of luck to you- it will be an exciting journey...

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark5pt56 View Post
    Now if we had to deliver a payload, yeah, 300WM smackdown.
    Yaaaaaasssssss! Delivering those 220-225 ELD variants is the best.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  6. #66
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    Your best friend shooting LR will be a chronograph to get accurate MV and strelok pro app. And later a weather meter of some type. Strelok will even give you correct holdover at any distance/magnification with that SFP scope. Like any software program, good data in = good data out. If you intend to shoot unknown distances, then a laser range finder comes into play. You can also learn to estimate distance using an MRAD/MOA reticle if you are good at judging height of objects.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by B52U View Post
    Your best friend shooting LR will be a chronograph to get accurate MV and strelok pro app. And later a weather meter of some type. Strelok will even give you correct holdover at any distance/magnification with that SFP scope. Like any software program, good data in = good data out. If you intend to shoot unknown distances, then a laser range finder comes into play. You can also learn to estimate distance using an MRAD/MOA reticle if you are good at judging height of objects.
    Second this. The combination of a Magnetospeed, Strelok, and a weathermeter make things much simpler, and are probably some of the better money I've spent on gear in the last couple of years.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark5pt56 View Post
    6.5-.308

    The debate always seems to come up and one has to think about what they are going to do with the gun. Do some unbiased research and let the math and science guide you in regards to the wind effect. There's always the science and art of shooting, understanding and applying the information is key, one without the other doesn't work well.
    For the moment, there is no 308 vs 6.5 debate for me. I have a 308. I don't have a 6.5 Creedmore. The LGS has a Creedmore that I'd like, but I don't have the $3k they're asking and don't want to sell what I have to get it. The 40x and I have been friends too long for me to get rid of it.

    I got the 20 MOA base installed. Next step is to go sight the rifle in. The 1,000 yard range is closed for the winter, but there are a couple of 300 yard ranges nearby.
    Quote Originally Posted by sinister View Post
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  9. #69
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    This has been a great knowledge based thread. I've gained some knowledge on areas I was lacking. Mist, was your range close to Sinister's people? That's one deterrent i have. Lack of a shooting buddy who can spot. The other bigger issue is lack of a long distance range that isn't a 2 hour drive, one way.
    "The attachment system of the 1913 picatinny is unmatched and will remain so for a thousand generations."
    G. Washington

    "If I had a quad rail on my musket, the outcome of the war would have been vastly different."
    J. Reb


  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jwknutson17 View Post
    I started off the longer range game with a 350 dollar remington 30-06 with a Bushnell elite 3200 scope with a SFP multi-x reticle. I quickly found a mil dot reticle optic but it was still SFP. I shot that for a long wile before upgrading to anything else. Shot for months at 600 before really going farther. Just learning what my rifle did and how wind affected my shots. A chrono and a good ballistic app really do a lot for you. Practice at 600 really, really helped me make hits at 8-1k and beyond. Or practice at 300-400 helped me make hits at 6. I think just time behind the gun, and not just throwing rounds at 1k for the sake of it, will benefit you greatly. I almost always shoot steel for instant feedback. Working my way up in distance keeps me from getting frustrated too. Just trying to go right to distance you can be sending 10 rounds down range without a hit and that gets old fast. Getting some hits at 3,5,7, etc first can really help. Then you will get the confidence to send one at 1k with good data and make first round hits. You will see how much you learn just getting time behind the rifle... Way more then any book or tool can tell you.
    Yep.

    Learning to walk, before you run- is how it's done successfully.

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