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Thread: Muzzle device sitting on muzzle instead of barrel shoulder

  1. #11
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    I should have said tension and it ain't Internet BS either. If compression and tension didn't occur, the threads wouldn't hold.

    The most precise way to torque a bolt is measure how much the bolt is stretched. For example, the installation of the main rotor blades on a Robinson R44 is very critical. So critical that torque isn't measured in ft/lbs, but by measuring bolt stretch. Engineers base in/lbs & ft/lbs torque specs on how much it stretches the bolt.

    When a muzzle device is torqued against the shoulder of the barrel, the barrel is placed under tension. The majority of that tension will be concentrated between the threads and shoulder. Stretching does occur. Over torquing the muzzle device has been observed to have a negative effect on precision.

    If the muzzle device is torqued against the crown, the barrel will experience compression forces mostly at the crown.

    Hmm...
    Last edited by MistWolf; 10-03-18 at 21:50.
    Quote Originally Posted by sinister View Post
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistWolf View Post
    I should have said tension and it ain't Internet BS either. If compression and tension didn't occur, the threads wouldn't hold.

    For example, the installation of the main rotor blades on a Robinson R44 is very critical. So critical that torque isn't measured in ft/lbs, but by measuring bolt stretch.
    Well, yeah, but is the Robinson R44 a Tier 1 helicopter?

    Sorry I jest.

    I think this is going to be like the old does the recoil begin before or after the projectile leaves the bore discussion.

    I am curious, though, about this: Now that I think about it, it's possible that compressing the muzzle is better than stretching it. Are you thinking that linear compression would enlarge the bore and that linear extension would tighten it? What about the mating surfaces of the crown and muzzle device? Just curious.
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  3. #13
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    Stretching from over torquing a muzzle device seated against the shoulder will be concentrated between the threads and the shoulder. Stretching will thin and lengthen the material. The stretched portion will be like a bulge in the bore.

    Over torquing a muzzle device that seats against the crown will compress the material at the crown. The compressed material will thicken and shorten. The bore will have a taper.

    I'm thinking the barrel might resist distortions from compression better than from stretching. But that's pure speculation on my part.
    Last edited by MistWolf; 10-05-18 at 13:10.
    Quote Originally Posted by sinister View Post
    There are two kinds of nations in the world -- those that use Metric and those who have walked on the moon.
    http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n289/SgtSongDog/AR%20Carbine/DSC_0114.jpg
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  4. #14
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    Okay, I can understand that.
    "If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said a faster horse." - Henry Ford

    “You are responsible for your actions, but the world doesn’t turn around you, so it’s important that you find something bigger than yourself to work for, a way for you to make a difference.” - Drew Dix, MOH VN '68

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artiz View Post
    I recall reading a thread talking about this a long time ago, I've been searching for a while without finding it so here goes.

    Specifically talking flash hiders that do not need to be indexed, like AAC blackouts, NOT suppressor-bearing hiders, is it considered acceptable to install one without crush or peel washers and simply torque it down on the face of the barrel, that is, the hider is sitting on the face of the muzzle instead of the shoulder of the barrel behind the threads? Meaning the muzzle device does not contact the shoulder of the barrel at all.

    Knowing many barrel designs simply don't have a shoulder (or too small of a shoulder) to hold a washer/muzzle device due to their small diameter, I'd be inclined to think this would be fine.

    However has anyone found detriments towards accuracy and/or strenght of using this method?
    Typically the muzzle devices that go on in such a manner do not require much tension or torque to install them.
    Stick


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