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Thread: Rem 788 Bolt action rifle, the legend continues

  1. #11
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    I bought 788 in .223 and we took the gun out last Sunday and it did not disappoint. We hoped it would shoot our 62 grain BTHP, but those babies wobbled and weaved at 100. We wanted a keyhole but it didn't even make contact with paper. The 55,52 50 grain variety were lights out. It shot 1/2 inch groups with ease, and the scope was a hunting Bushnell DOA 2.5-16 with a FAT reticle. Very please and everything we heard came to fruition.

    PB
    Last edited by Pappabear; 12-04-18 at 19:18.
    "Air Force / Policeman / Fireman / Man of God / Friend of mine / R.I.P. Steve Lamy"

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pappabear View Post
    I bought 788 in .223 and we took the gun out last Sunday and it did not disappoint. We hoped it would shoot our 62 grain BTHP, but those babies wobbled and weaved at 100. We wanted a keyhole but it didn't even make contact with paper. The 55,52 50 grain variety were lights out. It shot 1/2 inch groups with ease, and the scope was a hunting Bushnell DOA 2.5-16 with a FAT reticle. Very please and everything we heard came to fruition.

    PB
    Been waiting on this PB...so glad the old rifle shot like I thought it would!
    " Be NOT ye afraid of them..
    Remember the Lord, for He is GREAT & TERRIBLE!
    FIGHT for your bretheren..for your sons & for your daughters,
    for your wives & for your households"!

  3. #13
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    I had a couple guys I was stationed with in Montana who had 788's, both were .243's with what I think were 22-24 inch barrels. They killed a lot of deep and antelope with them, and one buddy who was into coyote calling dropped many a coyote at some pretty crazy distances.

    At one point, I was at a pawn shop downtown in Great Falls looking for hand tools and I found a short barrel (16" I think) 788 in .308. I almost passed on that gun, but as it was February and that gun was destined to sit for a while, the owner made me an offer I could not refuse. I put a cheap Bushnell 3 X 9 X 32 scope on it and killed several mule deer and prairie goats with that little rifle before I sold it to a friend who wanted it for elk hunting in the mountains because it was short and light.

    I cannot tell you what MOA that gun shot at, but my "sighting in" method was two pencil eraser size black dots 1/2 inch apart at 25 yards with 165 (or 168 maybe?) grain ammo (generally Remington Core Lock). Aim for the top dot, and when you shoot through the bottom dot 3 times in a row, it's good to go. I used to ring 8" steel plates at 325 yards consistently, so it worked for me...Yeah...I didn't have much of a clue, but I killed a lot deer.

    Those 788's are awesome shooters...

  4. #14
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    It's a cool gun. And it's always fun to go back and play with lighter bullets in .223. We'll see how far out we can make the light bullets fly.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  5. #15
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    I had a 788 in 6mm Rem for years.

    Fun little gun and it accounted for more than a few coyotes, jackrabbits, foxes, etc. Plus it was a loaner gun for kids for mule deer hunts.

    It was an accurate gun and yes they has a decent reputation for such. That said, putting it in perspective, they did not hold a candle to a modern gun such as a T3 Tikka or a Howa, that guaranteed sub MOA right from the factory. I enjoyed my little 788, but somebody offerred me enough money for it that I could buy a new T3, so it was a no brainer as far as I was concerned. The Scandinavian guns are significantly smoother, parts (and magazines) are available, and they shoot second to none.

    There is no doubt the 788s have a certain nostalgia factor associated with them, and if I saw another decent deal, I might pick one up, but I keep things in perspective in regards to their true abilities as compared to what is available today.
    THE CHAIR IS AGAINST THE WALL.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lost River View Post
    I had a 788 in 6mm Rem for years.

    Fun little gun and it accounted for more than a few coyotes, jackrabbits, foxes, etc. Plus it was a loaner gun for kids for mule deer hunts.

    It was an accurate gun and yes they has a decent reputation for such. That said, putting it in perspective, they did not hold a candle to a modern gun such as a T3 Tikka or a Howa, that guaranteed sub MOA right from the factory. I enjoyed my little 788, but somebody offerred me enough money for it that I could buy a new T3, so it was a no brainer as far as I was concerned. The Scandinavian guns are significantly smoother, parts (and magazines) are available, and they shoot second to none.

    There is no doubt the 788s have a certain nostalgia factor associated with them, and if I saw another decent deal, I might pick one up, but I keep things in perspective in regards to their true abilities as compared to what is available today.
    There is no nostalgia for me, just performance. Sub Moa is sub Moa regardless which what you call it.

    PB
    "Air Force / Policeman / Fireman / Man of God / Friend of mine / R.I.P. Steve Lamy"

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