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Thread: Lift those weights for the healthy heart

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Safari View Post
    The article I posted is just one of the many I've read. My opthalmologist agrees weight-lifting is a risk.
    A known risk of causation or contraindicated for those prone to it (who is prone and who is not far from clear) or those with it? Review I posted is the most recent I could find as it does not appear to support a cause and effect relationship, and suggests a number of other factors that also need to be considered. If your opthalmologist has data showing otherwise, by all means post it so i can read it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Safari View Post
    Benefits outweighing risk? That's fine and good until you start going blind, then what do you say about it?
    Stats apply to groups, not individuals, and that's assuming cause and effect, which is not supported. My mother refused to wear her seat belt because when she was a kid she had a friend who car went off a cliff and he escaped last second. I never saw that as a reason not to wear my belt (as the risk/benefit strongly favors wearing it) while that n=1 example was enough for her not to.

    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Safari View Post
    I'm one to err on the side of not doing any more weightlifting. Instead I now make sure my workout has plenty of walking and other activities that are known to decrease intraocular pressure.

    YMMV but to me it's just not worth possibly going blind when I can do other exercises that actually help my condition.
    But in your case, as someone who has that condition, it's likely contra indicated for you, which is a different issue altogether. From The Glaucoma Research Foundation, and they don't appear to advise people avoid RT:

    https://www.glaucoma.org/glaucoma/do...t-glaucoma.php
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillBrink View Post
    A known risk of causation or contraindicated for those prone to it (who is prone and who is not far from clear) or those with it? Review I posted is the most recent I could find as it does not appear to support a cause and effect relationship, and suggests a number of other factors that also need to be considered. If your opthalmologist has data showing otherwise, by all means post it so i can read it.
    Seriously? My state-licensed medically certified opthalmologist says that weightlifting could worsen my glaucoma. What medical certifications or qualifications do you have to dispute it? I'm not trying to be a dick but your whole statement is rather arrogant. Am I supposed to go back to my eye doctor and say, "This dude on the internet says he wants proof that lifting weights is risky as far as worsening my glaucoma. Would you be so kind as to produce some evidence that what you're saying is true?"

    I think you can appreciate that's not going to happen.

    I also wouldn't waste my time.

    Believe what I posted and what the article says or don't believe it. I don't care. It's not worth my disbelieving it, to put it bluntly, especially since several sources (like WebMD and glaucoma-association, for example) concur. It's like if your family has a history of lung cancer and your doctor is telling you it's better if you don't smoke, maybe he might just accidentally have a point?

    Further, my eye doctor has been right about everything else (including the fact that walking more is beneficial). I was a huge believer in an aftermarket supplement that has a reputation for reducing eye pressure. He proved to me it was junk. So I tend to trust what he says.

    Bottom line, even in the face of some contradictory studies it is not worth the risk especially since I can do other exercises that are known to be beneficial.
    Last edited by Doc Safari; 11-30-18 at 16:29.


    W.I. Thomas: "If men define situations as real, they are real in their consequences".

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Safari View Post
    Seriously? My state-licensed medically certified opthalmologist says that weightlifting could worsen my glaucoma.
    Which is altogether different that claiming it was a cause of the glaucoma, which is not supported by the data. Not sure why that's so tough to grasp. At this time, there's currently no data that supports weight lifting as a cause of glaucoma, but maybe contraindicated for those that do have it, but studies seemed mixed. You can believe otherwise as you wish, but what I said is exactly in line with what your state-licensed medically certified opthalmologist said apparently.

    All the best.
    Last edited by WillBrink; 11-30-18 at 17:17.
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  4. #14
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    I don't think anything I posted suggests that weight-lifting "causes" glaucoma, just that it's a risk factor. Like high blood pressure, glaucoma is a complex condition. All I'm saying is that if "refraining" from weight-lifting is safe, then I'm not going to "participate" in weight-lifting because that does incur some risk. It's not worth taking a chance even if it's no more significant a contributing factor than other things. For example: I've given up caffeine for the most part too for the same reason. And I'm not going to take up playing a wind instrument, either.

    For the average Joe, I'd say if you have a family history of glaucoma or have been told you have elevated intraocular pressure, then maybe weight-lifting isn't for you. It just says "check things out" before you jump into an exercise program.
    Last edited by Doc Safari; 11-30-18 at 17:27.


    W.I. Thomas: "If men define situations as real, they are real in their consequences".

  5. #15
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    Good bump for this thread:

    Via The New Your Times

    Even a Little Weight Training May Cut the Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke

    Despite the muscle-building, flab-trimming and, according to recent research, mood-boosting benefits of lifting weights, such resistance exercise has generally been thought not to contribute much to heart health, as endurance workouts like jogging and cycling do. But a study published in October in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise provides evidence for the first time that even a little weight training might reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke. People appear to gain this benefit whether or not they also engage in frequent aerobic exercise.

    The study drew from an invaluable cache of health data gathered at the Cooper Clinic in Dallas, where thousands of men and women have been undergoing annual checkups, which include filling out detailed questionnaires about their exercise habits and medical history. More than 12,500 records were anonymized for men and women, most of them middle-aged, who had visited the clinic at least twice between 1987 and 2006. The subjects were categorized according to their reported resistance exercise routines, ranging from those who never lifted to those who completed one, two, three or more weekly sessions (or whether they lifted for more or less than an hour each week). Another category was aerobic exercise and whether subjects met the standard recommendation of 150 minutes per week of brisk workouts. This exercise data was then crosschecked against heart attacks, strokes and deaths during the 11 years or so after each participant’s last clinic visit.

    Cont:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/04/w...sDoSkeWrB9Yyv0

    Study: https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?a...00000000-96766
    - Will

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    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

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