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Thread: Article: Training for Reality: Reloads and Situational Awareness

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    Article: Training for Reality: Reloads and Situational Awareness


    Have we been training incorrectly? Incorporating certain illogical concepts into the finite reality of the "square range" and if we have, should we change it? This question comes up, from time to time, and it did after I wrote The Carry Reload in early 2017. There was a lot of research that needed to be done, so I sought out people who I knew had the experience I was looking to reference, to contrast against my own, and I wanted to get other information from various sources because I wanted this to be as unbiased as possible, I wanted the facts to lead me. The problem which we are constantly plagued with in the training industry is that we try to reinvent the wheel, we try to stick to the known, friendly and acceptable methods of instruction. The issue which comes out of this type of dogmatic training paradigm is that we find ourselves repeating drills based on nothing more than perceived need of doing so, or attempting to achieve some sort of status. Reloading is one those aspects of various drills which a lot of instructors incorporate in their coursework, and it should be, but should it be regarded to at such a high level as to completely detach itself from the requirements of reality?

    Read the full article here -> http://www.vdmsr.com/2018/12/trainin...loads-and.html

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    Great article. I remember when you sent out the email asking for civilian reload research. Several instructors I've worked with have stressed similar points. Most of them have hammered home the need to top off after every engagement or event so you should virtually never be caught in a slide lock situation.

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    Nicely written article. To me it puts a lot of things into perspective based on real world data.

    Though I am not a BTDT guy, I have seen the videos such as that of TRex arms and really wonder what the real world need for training like that is. I think you nailed it, seems more like marekting and entertainment than real value.

    Even when I shoot IDPA, I ask myself how valid this type of gaming/training is, but it does instill a few thing; draw from concealment, vital area shot placement and use of cover and concealment. Sure there is a reload in there and that helpws with the fine motor skills of a reload in the case it would ever actually be needed. What I despise is that i have to download my mags to 10 rounds. If IDPA is trying to simulate potential real world situations, then let me load my mag to capacity. If it is to support “rules” for states that are limited, then on a state level they should allow what is allowed.
    ETC (SW/AW), USN (1998-2008)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Furbyballer View Post
    Great article. I remember when you sent out the email asking for civilian reload research. Several instructors I've worked with have stressed similar points. Most of them have hammered home the need to top off after every engagement or event so you should virtually never be caught in a slide lock situation.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Thanks for reading.

    Topping off, and/or having the ability to sustain a deadly force confrontation past your in-gun capacity is an important concept to develop. It is really needs to be something people accept as a fact of carrying.

    Quote Originally Posted by hotrodder636 View Post
    Nicely written article. To me it puts a lot of things into perspective based on real world data.

    Though I am not a BTDT guy, I have seen the videos such as that of TRex arms and really wonder what the real world need for training like that is. I think you nailed it, seems more like marekting and entertainment than real value.

    Even when I shoot IDPA, I ask myself how valid this type of gaming/training is, but it does instill a few thing; draw from concealment, vital area shot placement and use of cover and concealment. Sure there is a reload in there and that helpws with the fine motor skills of a reload in the case it would ever actually be needed. What I despise is that i have to download my mags to 10 rounds. If IDPA is trying to simulate potential real world situations, then let me load my mag to capacity. If it is to support “rules” for states that are limited, then on a state level they should allow what is allowed.
    Thanks for reading.

    I do not want to turn this into a discussion about competition issues, or the like, I will just say the following on the matter and you can figure out your own personal take on the subject.

    Gaming/competition is not training, it never was, it is not, and it should never be considered training. It is a game, with no consequences. Training for reality requires there be "skin in the game" because of the nature of the deadly force confrontations which we know exist and occur. If you like to play games, then do your thing, but do not for a split second be of the mind that gaming is in any way training for reality.

    Training for reality is training for reality. Discrimination of targets, no mag limits, unknown circumstances, force on force, etc. Those are all things training for reality should cover. Actual accurate and precise shooting skills can be obtained outside of gaming, it takes time and dedication.

    Gaming a a way and not the way.

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    Speaking as an instructor, that picture shows a guy with no muzzle discipline. Makes his T shirt into a punchline, he's lacking the single most important safety skill.
    Last edited by Jammer Six; 12-17-18 at 01:53. Reason: I can't spill.
    "When I have your wounded." -- Major Charles L. Kelly, callsign "Dustoff", refusing to acknowledge that an L.Z. was too hot, moments before being killed by a single shot, July 1st, 1964.

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    Interesting perspective, thank you for sharing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Voodoo_Man View Post

    Thanks for reading.

    I do not want to turn this into a discussion about competition issues, or the like, I will just say the following on the matter and you can figure out your own personal take on the subject.

    Gaming/competition is not training, it never was, it is not, and it should never be considered training. It is a game, with no consequences. Training for reality requires there be "skin in the game" because of the nature of the deadly force confrontations which we know exist and occur. If you like to play games, then do your thing, but do not for a split second be of the mind that gaming is in any way training for reality.

    Training for reality is training for reality. Discrimination of targets, no mag limits, unknown circumstances, force on force, etc. Those are all things training for reality should cover. Actual accurate and precise shooting skills can be obtained outside of gaming, it takes time and dedication.

    Gaming a a way and not the way.
    ETC (SW/AW), USN (1998-2008)
    CVN-65, USS Enterprise

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jammer Six View Post


    Speaking as an instructor, that picture shows a guy with no muzzle discipline. Makes his T shirt into a punchline, he's lacking the single most important safety skill.
    There is a very specific reason to reload like that, in that particular arm setup. IF you think that's improper in any way, I HIGHLY recommend you do some professional development.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Voodoo_Man View Post

    I do not want to turn this into a discussion about competition issues, or the like, I will just say the following on the matter and you can figure out your own personal take on the subject.

    Gaming/competition is not training, it never was, it is not, and it should never be considered training. It is a game, with no consequences. Training for reality requires there be "skin in the game" because of the nature of the deadly force confrontations which we know exist and occur. If you like to play games, then do your thing, but do not for a split second be of the mind that gaming is in any way training for reality.

    Training for reality is training for reality. Discrimination of targets, no mag limits, unknown circumstances, force on force, etc. Those are all things training for reality should cover. Actual accurate and precise shooting skills can be obtained outside of gaming, it takes time and dedication.

    Gaming a a way and not the way.
    I see your point.

    The way I see it, “warrior games” have been around for millennia. Im not really a big student of history, but we all know the Greeks and Romans used games to build warrior skills, as did most tribes throughout the world. Competition has always been the “safe” way to judge/gauge skills, be they endurance, strength, hand to hand combat, agility, weapon craft, problem solving, etc. The Romans used the Gladiator games. Greeks created the Olympics.

    I’m not insinuating the current firearms competitions are reality scenario based, nor am I judging training quality in relation to real world situations. But there is definately skill building going on, good or bad. Assuming you are properly and correctly applying good techniques, dry fire is better than not dry firing...live fire square range is better than dry fire....moving/shooting is better than square range....force on force simunitions is better than moving/shooting....surviving a gunfight is best experience....

    We’ve all heard the saying “practice makes perfect” and then the closer to reality version “practice makes permanent”. All firearms training is simply preparing for a chaotic event none of us really want to happen and all wish to survive from...

    Just my perspective from a guy whose never BTDT...but read lots of accounts about those that have...
    Last edited by BuzzinSATX; 12-17-18 at 06:13.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Voodoo_Man View Post
    There is a very specific reason to reload like that, in that particular arm setup. IF you think that's improper in any way, I HIGHLY recommend you do some professional development.
    Another option would be for him to learn basic skills, including reloading while keeping his muzzle pointed in a direction such that in the event of a negligent discharge the bullet won't clear the berm.

    You can rationalize it all you want; an unsafe act remains unsafe.

    There's no question about whether it's improper. The picture provides all the data needed to DQ him on the spot.

    Quote Originally Posted by BuzzinSATX View Post
    We’ve all heard the saying “practice makes perfect” and then the closer to reality version “practice makes permanent”.
    I liked hearing that people came back from Iraq and Afghanistan and said the NTC was harder. That's the way to train.

    You'll follow your training. (Which is yet another point against the picture.)
    "When I have your wounded." -- Major Charles L. Kelly, callsign "Dustoff", refusing to acknowledge that an L.Z. was too hot, moments before being killed by a single shot, July 1st, 1964.

    Black Lives Matter. All confederate symbols and monuments need to go.
    Proud to live in a sanctuary city.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jammer Six View Post
    Another option would be for him to learn basic skills, including reloading while keeping his muzzle pointed in a direction such that in the event of a negligent discharge the bullet won't clear the berm.

    You can rationalize it all you want; an unsafe act remains unsafe.

    There's no question about whether it's improper. The picture provides all the data needed to DQ him on the spot.
    Are you serious? At no time ever have I ever been instructed to reload in relation to a berm, in competition or otherwise. You sir are making Vmans point for him. Seriously take sometime and see bill rapier, Jared reston, kd4, buck doyle or numerous other well vetted instructors.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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