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Thread: BOB testing/knife testing

  1. #1
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    BOB testing/knife testing

    I decided to go camping to see if my BOB had what it should to supply what I needed for 48 hours (although could be stretched to 72 easily) and try some bush craft with a new Hardcore Hardware fixed blade MFK-02 GEN II.

    I used it for all the usual uses for a camp site prep and making a fire. Fire wise, I used a
    Sportsman Pocket Chainsaw from my BOB to cut a 4' piece of wood that was maybe 6" diameter from a downed tree and dragged out of the brush. I used the Sportsman Pocket Chainsaw to cut into 4 pieces. While the "manual chainsaw" works, it's work to use one, that's for sure. Hard to beat in terms of weight and space it takes up however. I then did the baton thing on the 4 pieces to split in two and and 4 parts for my main firewood supply. I think it was spruce.

    Kindling was easy to find where i was, and I used a fire rod and and cotton balls impregnated with Vaseline (great cheap fire starters BTW) to start the fire.

    I found the knife was just right size wise for the jobs it did, and it didn't even scuff the coating on the blade much less do any damage to the knife. The ergonomics fit my (smallish) hands perfectly. So far, this knife is exactly what I have been looking in hard use utility/survival type knife.

    Other camp chores were all good. I didn't do any slicing of food with it as I was eating the dehydrated stuff from the BOB (surprisingly good BTW) and an MRE.

    Only "cheat" was I did use a tent and did bring a gallon of water as i didn't want to use a Life Straw or water supplies in the BOB. I did sleep in the Woobie blanket I had in the BOB, and that was not very comfortable (I'm getting to old for sleeping on the ground frankly) but warm enough. In a true emergency where a BOB would get used, I have a mil issue poncho in the BOB I would use to make a shelter, but I'm just not hard core enough to wanna do it unless it's an legit emergency. What can I say, I'm a big wuss puss.

    I now have to resupply what I used from the BOB, including the "emergency" Jack Daniels in the flask...

    PS, I'm out of room to attach pics on M4C, so if anyone wants to see knife, etc, I posted on Blade Forums:

    https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/...sting.1633771/
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

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    ďThose who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.Ē

  2. #2
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    When I saw BOB, I thought it was the same Band of Brother Tops fieldcraft knife I own. Itís a sweet knife as well. Good post except the Jack Daniels ....JK I am from Ky so if itís not bourbon Its blasphemy ��

    PB
    "Air Force / Policeman / Fireman / Man of God / Friend of mine / R.I.P. Steve Lamy"

  3. #3
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    Everyone who em0loys a "BOB" should camp with it, for at least a day and a night. It's the quickest way to identify deficiencies; things you will need but don't have, and things you thought you'd need but can do without.

    Long ago I called by bag an E-bag (emergency). After all the camping and hiking with it, and the evolutions it's gone through, I call it an A-bag (always-bag).

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ViniVidivici View Post
    Everyone who em0loys a "BOB" should camp with it, for at least a day and a night. It's the quickest way to identify deficiencies; things you will need but don't have, and things you thought you'd need but can do without.

    Long ago I called by bag an E-bag (emergency). After all the camping and hiking with it, and the evolutions it's gone through, I call it an A-bag (always-bag).
    Indeed, which was my main motivator. I expected more responses this thread honestly. Main thing I did learn was, more water! I was sweating my ass off as I prepped the wood for a fire, and did not want to resort to the Life Straw or water tablets if I could help it. I broke the water rule to save some weight, and had I not brought that extra "cheat" gallon, would have had to use the Life Straw. Oh, and it confirmed for me that sleeping on the ground at 53, is not the same as when I was 25. I was sore for 2 days. Next time, I will cheat with a decent blow up mattress.
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Performance/Fitness Advice For the Tactical Community

    www.OptimalSWAT.com


    ďThose who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.Ē

  5. #5
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    When my boys were in scouts a favorite yearly camping trip was the "#10 can survival" trip.

    You could take a #10 can (or 1 gallon paint can ) of stuff in addition to your normal EDC (no pocket stuffing, just pocket knife, belt survival kits, etc.).

    Drinkable water was available for sanitary reasons, but there were streams there that could have been used if needed.

    It was suprisingly comfortable, but I made a bed from leaves. Biggest gripe was the bright full moon, clear plastic I used as a rain fly made it hard to sleep.

    Depending on weather I could have been comfortable with less.

    I've been planning similar with a nalgene bottle sized kit with nesting cup, but have not done it.

    Then again, I'm 10 years older, so may not be as comfortable!
    Last edited by pinzgauer; 01-05-19 at 17:45.

  6. #6
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    It's always fun to try to survive with as little as possible!

    I run a 2qt. Hydrator in my bag, and have a Sawyer Mini as backup. The Mini is awesome.

    I hear ya about sleepin' on the ground. For 3 out of 4 seasons, two ponchos is great: one for a roof, and one as a poncho hammock. Very comfortable, and easy in wooded environments, of course. With a woobie or fleece sleeping bag.

  7. #7
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    I am glad to see you didnít pull on your woobie.
    This is a family forum after all. ;-)

  8. #8
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    I use an insulated air mattress. It is light enough and packs small. Also serves to keep the ground cold at bay.
    Water, water, water. Easily the heaviest part of kit. I use the sawyer mini as well. I have life straws and others. The sawyer is just hard to beat.

  9. #9
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    Everyone should test their BOB at some point, don't take the chance in testing your gear when things hit the fan. It is a hard pill to swallow when your gear fails. You can start by setting up camp during adverse weather conditions in your own back yard, from there head out to other areas as confidence and skills improve. Water is always a problem in desert areas, in my area I know the locations for most of the springs, however, I will need to come fully equipped to filter the water. When I am moving fast my water consumption dramatically increases, so I take that into consideration when I am out training. In cold and wet conditions a quality insulated mattress is critical and it should not be ignored. There is no need to die or get hurt testing your gear, test all your gear in all conditions to include day and night settings.

  10. #10
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    My problem is I forget the stuff I have in my deployment bag. So I'd go out and end up doing things the hard way, and then realize I had a solution in the bag.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

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