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Thread: Oil for revolvers ?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by shadowrider View Post
    it's going to perform to the designed service life.
    Yeah, that's exactly the problem though. 99% of the people you tell to apply grease to the innards of a J-frame will not degrease and reapply until the gun stops working. The grease will exceed its service life and then become a problem. So recommending it for the 1% of users who will do PM correctly is a problem because the benefit is a marginally better trigger and the harm is a gun that doesn't work for the lion's share of your users.

  2. #22
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    I use Froglube on everything. I suspect the dry air in Phx makes it perfect. So many people have had issue, we have never had any issue. But I dont drown my guns with oil either. I do like the paste as well.

    PB
    "Air Force / Policeman / Fireman / Man of God / Friend of mine / R.I.P. Steve Lamy"

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron3 View Post
    Oil collects some junk, runs out. Your weapon is now dry and dirty.

    Grease collects more junk than oil, and stays on parts better. Your weapon is dirty, but lubricated much longer.

    When you wipe off the old grease, it will Instantly remove much of the junk, too. Then regrease.

    I used to use oil only. Gave grease a try and regretted not using it years sooner.

    Gun stays lubed longer and are easier to clean. Doesn't run out on clothes like oil. Is cheap, less messy to apply, no downside that I've ever encountered.

    Of course someone could apply too much. A thin layer is all it takes.

    As mentioned oil is better for things that are hard to get to because it flows in. But it also flows out and has to be reapplied more often.

    I keep and use both.
    But when you squirt some more CLP in there, it refreshes the lubrication. Powder soot flows out and oil flows in.

    Grease does indeed collect junk and stay on the parts, and that's the problem.

    Google "Filthy 14." It's an AR that ran for tens of thousands of rounds w/o cleaning. Oil was added as needed. It kept running.

    Do we think the same would happen with grease? No, it would turn to sludge and stop the gun, with increased wear to the aluminum receiver and the steel bolt carrier group parts along the way.

    Grease is for wheel bearings. Oil is for gunz.

  4. #24
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    Oil for revolvers ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Uni-Vibe View Post
    But when you squirt some more CLP in there, it refreshes the lubrication. Powder soot flows out and oil flows in.

    Grease does indeed collect junk and stay on the parts, and that's the problem.

    Google "Filthy 14." It's an AR that ran for tens of thousands of rounds w/o cleaning. Oil was added as needed. It kept running.

    Do we think the same would happen with grease? No, it would turn to sludge and stop the gun, with increased wear to the aluminum receiver and the steel bolt carrier group parts along the way.

    Grease is for wheel bearings. Oil is for gunz.
    Filthy 14 was also lubricated damn near every day it was used, with a big spray bottle of slip.

    No parts are fit so precisely on an AR that molecules of carbon in any quantity are going to wear it down suspended in grease, nor is anything else going to be suspended in the grease in sufficient quantity to matter that is harder than the 7000 series aluminum or steel.

    Can grease oxidize and become sludge? Sure. Will it with even a pretty relaxed cleaning schedule? Hardly. Iíd also say that choosing the correct formulation will render that argument completely null. There are a lot of dirty applications that use grease and are a grease once for the lifetime of the part or grease once annually type deals.

    Grease can also suspend water, which means that you should definitely consider your conditions for PM, but is less likely to flat disappear from that same contact with water.



    Do you know why grease is used in certain industrial applications over oil or why wheel bearings use grease instead of oil? This is because grease is significantly better at lubricating things that stop and start that arenít designed to be lubricated via an oil bath or splash etc.... My rifles and handguns donít have a sump from which oil is pumped or through which circulating parts cycle.

    Any energy loss through churning is negligible and we donít need oil to dissipate heat as is the case in many oil centric applications.

    Oil is fine, and sometimes preferable for its ability to migrate. Particularly on the firing line or when you canít strip the firearm to reapply and other situations. But for the person lubricating his carry firearm be it an armed citizen, LEO, or soldier? Grease makes a lot of sense, and that person can still easily apply oil should they get bogged down in a firefight that lasts days.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uni-Vibe View Post
    I use CLP on semi auto rifles and pistols. That's what it's made for. Do y'all think I should use a lighter oil on revolvers?
    I use CLP or RemOil on everything gun related. I have never had any issues.
    Good night Chesty...wherever you are.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by artoter View Post
    I use CLP or RemOil on everything gun related. I have never had any issues.
    So I've decided to use Rem Oil with a needle oiler for my revolvers. It's a very light oil and I apply it sparingly and infrequently.

    I've been using Breakfree CLP forever on semi auto pistols and rifles, and my pump shotguns. Applied generously to the rifles and pistols, and lighter on the pump guns.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uni-Vibe View Post
    So I've decided to use Rem Oil with a needle oiler for my revolvers. It's a very light oil and I apply it sparingly and infrequently.

    I've been using Breakfree CLP forever on semi auto pistols and rifles, and my pump shotguns. Applied generously to the rifles and pistols, and lighter on the pump guns.
    I've never applied oil to revolvers. All work fine and some are from the 30s

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Quijote View Post
    Per Grant Cunningham, oil for parts that spin on a shaft or pivot and grease for parts that slide

    Check his blog for his well reasoned recommendations
    Quote Originally Posted by Uni-Vibe View Post
    I reject this.

    Grease has no place on a firearm.
    Grant Cunningham is a highly respected and regarded revolver gunsmith and seems to have done his homework consulting with lubrication experts.

    What's your subject matter expertise on this?

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pappabear View Post
    I use Froglube on everything. I suspect the dry air in Phx makes it perfect. So many people have had issue, we have never had any issue. But I dont drown my guns with oil either. I do like the paste as well.

    PB
    I used to use FrogLube as my primary lubricant [guns that is] and during a 2000 round test it turned to a sticky sludge that retarded slide action. I only got 800 rounds into the test. Regular grease worked fine. Just my experience, I still use it for surface protection which it excels at. But FL and AZ are very different....
    Last edited by 1986s4; 02-07-19 at 08:26.

  10. #30
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    Tore down a buddy's J-gun today to change out the rebound spring. He'd had the Model 37 for 20 years, and claimed to have lubed it with CLP.
    It was almost certainly carried a little and fired virtually never.
    I never saw such gunk, and it took Hoppes, denatured alcohol, and finally GooGone to get it off. All gone to varnish and dirt.
    I use 5w-40 that we used for my wife's old Audi. It does have to be relubed from time to time, and a needle oiler saves you from too much.
    Moon

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