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Thread: How Important Is Exercise For Weight Loss?

  1. #61
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    I came across a eating plan for natural body builders which allocated calories based upon the individuals weight, which was to be taken once a week upon waking up. The idea being that you'd constantly be lowering the total calorie intake to match your weight loss or gain goals. The starting allocation was 11 calories per pound. This Macros would be 1.25-1.5g of protein per lb of body weight, carbs being 40-60% of the total allocation of calories less the amount for protein and the remaining balance went to fat. If after a week if weight loss goals weren't being met, you would decrease to 9 or 10 calories per pound for example.

    I don't recall coming across a plan that had this constant adjustment based on weight and found it interesting. Its interesting considering the information in the article, about how people become more metabolically efficient as their weight decreased.
    Last edited by bp7178; 04-15-19 at 15:32.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hmac View Post
    The metabolic effect of weight loss surgery resets the set point. There aren't any non-surgical treatments available yet.
    So your two choices are some sort of weight loss surgery or a lifetime of extreme discipline, diligence and dedication of controlling how much you eat?

    I'm still trying to wrap my head around this. Is the article saying that some people have a set point that's way into the obese category?

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    So your two choices are some sort of weight loss surgery or a lifetime of extreme discipline, diligence and dedication of controlling how much you eat?

    I'm still trying to wrap my head around this. Is the article saying that some people have a set point that's way into the obese category?
    Yes. But there are multiple factors that make up what the set point actually is. They include genetics, environment, and behavior. You canít do anything about the genetics. You can repudiate the behavior, which most of learned growing up in a less nutritionally aware culture...the way of eating that our parents taught us, but thatís not easy to turn your back on, just like any other set of lifetime habits. Environment? Thatís complicated. It includes things like..how much television you watch, how far you live from a Dennyís (for example)...even the size of your dinner plates at home.

    Itís hard enough to wake up one day and just decide to change your lifestyle...eat healthy, exercise more etc, but itís REALLY hard when your set point has your body pumping out massive amounts of ghrelin even if you miss just one meal. The success rate for significant weight loss (defined as losing 50% of your body mass and keeping it off for two years) using diet and exercise alone is repeatedly demonstrated as being about 2%. 98% of people fail at long term weight loss, even with pharmacologic support (google the Fen-phen trial).

    Physiology is a bitch.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hmac View Post
    Yes. But there are multiple factors that make up what the set point actually is. They include genetics, environment, and behavior. You can’t do anything about the genetics. You can repudiate the behavior, which most of learned growing up in a less nutritionally aware culture...the way of eating that our parents taught us, but that’s not easy to turn your back on, just like any other set of lifetime habits. Environment? That’s complicated. It includes things like..how much television you watch, how far you live from a Denny’s (for example)...even the size of your dinner plates at home.

    It’s hard enough to wake up one day and just decide to change your lifestyle...eat healthy, exercise more etc, but it’s REALLY hard when your set point has your body pumping out massive amounts of ghrelin even if you miss just one meal. The success rate for significant weight loss (defined as losing 50% of your body mass and keeping it off for two years) using diet and exercise alone is repeatedly demonstrated as being about 2%. 98% of people fail at long term weight loss, even with pharmacologic support (google the Fen-phen trial).

    Physiology is a bitch.
    I guess I'll strive to be that 2% then, not much else I can do. Insurance isn't going to cover any type of surgery for a 255# guy that wants to get down to 190 or so. I haven't had any real issues with being hungry while doing this for a couple months. I guess one way to stay on task is to educate myself about all the reasons you can fail, and try not to do them. I haven't spent a dime on supplements, diet pills, or diet programs, so I won't have the disappointment of spending a bunch of money and failing.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Basically the same thing I am doing. I'm in the middle of a huge re-model roofing project on a house we bought. Three months ago I couldn't have dreamed of being up there, but 35lbs lighter today made it possible. I'm on day 7 without a break and I'm still going up and down the ladder with no issues. Still have 65lbs to go.
    LOL! It was easier keeping my 300 yd long mountainside driveway cleared of snow this winter but Iím still not climbing up on my two story roof because I hate heights! Good on you brother!
    If I can lose another 10# Iíll be a happy camper, if I can keep it off Iíll hopefully live to be an ancient happy camper. My parents are both 89 and still kicking in spite of their diet. Biscuits, gravy and pizza are food groups to them, no wonder I managed to pack on excess ballast over my 60 years. Being on the LEO diet plan for over 30 years didnít help either.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnar da Wolf View Post
    LOL! It was easier keeping my 300 yd long mountainside driveway cleared of snow this winter but I’m still not climbing up on my two story roof because I hate heights! Good on you brother!
    If I can lose another 10# I’ll be a happy camper, if I can keep it off I’ll hopefully live to be an ancient happy camper. My parents are both 89 and still kicking in spite of their diet. Biscuits, gravy and pizza are food groups to them, no wonder I managed to pack on excess ballast over my 60 years. Being on the LEO diet plan for over 30 years didn’t help either.
    LOL... I don't shovel snow. My snow shovels are yellow and have CAT written on their sides. I even designed my house so I can plow within an inch of the door threshold. Hmmm.. maybe that's why I'm fat.

  7. #67
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    Nice ideas..thanks for sharing





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  8. #68
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    Hmac is the SME in this area. Will, thanks for the information, Hmac, thanks for your input. Between expertise of both of y'all it paints a very clear picture.

    I know that at age 50, I have to work twice as hard to lose a quarter as much. And I have to be very disciplined with what and how I eat. Because of multiple issues, I don't work out as much or as long as I used to, and realize that as long as I keep moving in some aspect and eat decently, I have a shot of losing that last 15 pounds that I really need to lose.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckman View Post
    Hmac is the SME in this area. Will, thanks for the information, Hmac, thanks for your input. Between expertise of both of y'all it paints a very clear picture.

    I know that at age 50, I have to work twice as hard to lose a quarter as much. And I have to be very disciplined with what and how I eat. Because of multiple issues, I don't work out as much or as long as I used to, and realize that as long as I keep moving in some aspect and eat decently, I have a shot of losing that last 15 pounds that I really need to lose.
    If there's anyone thing you you et al can take away from what I and he tend to say, where you will find us in 100% agreement: getting the wight off is not the difficult part per se, it's keeping it off that is. The absolute take home is, finding an approach you can and will maintain forever, with usual ups and downs we all face, that improves general health. Taking the long view is the only view that ultimately works.
    - Will

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  10. #70
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    This is something that I’ve always struggled with. As a teenager one summer of running and weights and i went from being the fatkid to pretty lean and muscular. I rode that for a while and after grad school i quit working out, ate like crap, and one morning I looked in the mirror and i was 6’3” and 350lb. I joined the gym, cleaned up my diet, cut back in booze, started running as a way to meet people in a new city, and next think I knew i was a lean looking 225 at the end if my first marathon. Being single and living alone it was easy to control my diet. A couple years later, I crossed the finish line of my first Ironman at 245... suddenly i wasn’t living alone, I had to eat around someone else schedule, and with training 28 hr a week and working full time. I ate garbage to keep moving and ate formal sit down meals at home... now, 7 years later. With a family, I’m not in control of my meal schedule, or workout schedule. And I’m 295... even though I did my 14th half Ironman last weekend. The lessons I’ve learned are.

    1 it’s time to get serious about diet. And I need to get my wife on board.
    2 running is good for me. Long triathlons are not. Running mentally helps me to control my diet. I comeback from a long run tired and nauseous. My body tells me to eat light and sleep. Swimming, I feel great but am voraciously hungry. Amd grab anything I can find. My wife is a snacker, and buys things I never trusted myself to have in the house. Cycling is neutral. I’m not starving. But not burning the same calories.
    3 all day activity is great for weight loss. Example, surfing. It’s not a huge caloric burn. But I’m not eating on a surf board. And it’s fun so keeps me going. Hiking is bad, because my wife packs snacks.

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