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Thread: IFAK setup advice & what is the best compact gauze and compression bandages?

  1. #1
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    IFAK setup advice & what is the best compact gauze and compression bandages?

    First off I have TECC training, I took an 8 hour course with a local instructor who is a SWAT medic (I know I am not officially TECC certified). So please no "get training" comments.
    We were taught in the course to be able to treat or at least stabilize most GSW's with rolled Kerlix gauze, ACE bandages, TQs and Chest seals (and how to improvise them).

    We practiced with just regular rolled gauze and ACE bandages. I've found these often don't fit the best in any of my IFAKs, but the surplus compression bandages are also extremely bulky.
    I guess what I'm asking is, what are some good options for regular gauze (maybe compressed) and ACE/ compression bandage that isn't as space consuming.

    I have multiple IFAK's i'm working on setting up, a few small blowout IFAKs (just essentials) and some larger IFAKs.

    So far for my small blowout IFAKs I plan on having the following:
    -1x CAT TQ
    -2x Chest Seal
    -1x Combat Gauze
    -1x ACE/ Compression bandage


    For my larger IFAK's they will vary, but generally something along the following:
    -1 to 2x CAT TQ or SOFTW (some may be mounted externally)
    -2x Chest Seal
    -1x Combat Gauze
    -1x ACE Bandage
    -1x regular gauze (compressed perhaps) (tbd)
    -Emergency heat blanket
    -Decompression needle
    -Nasal Airway

    Anything you guys think I'm missing in my IFAKs?

    Thank you
    A Student once said to his master: "You teach me fighting, but you talk about peace. How do you reconcile the two?"
    The master replied: "It is better to be a warrior in a garden than to be a gardener in a war."

    Gear, or rifles are only as good as the user. Even if a rifle is true to an inch at a mile, even if gear is as light as a feather, yet as durable as leather, it is limited by its user. Invest in training.

  2. #2
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    In what context are you planning to use these?

    Duty (LE), vehicle storage, range kit?

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    A brief IFAK packing pictorial I made. Follow link, look at the pictures and come back with questions. Remember that IFAK is an individual first aid kit, and TECC is more aid bag oriented, so some of that stuff may not fit in a belt or IBA mounted IFAK. If your CAT is still in its wrapper, you are wrong. You can attach extra CATs to MOLLE or belts with a rubber band or put it in a flashbang pouch. The guaze in my kit is Quick Clot Combat Gauze, z-folded and vacuum packed. The compression bandage/pressure dressing is a .mil issued ETD/Israeli 4” Emergency Trauma Dressing, with the outermost wrapper removed.

    https://imgur.com/gallery/fnQSjjg
    RLTW

    “That is why there isn't an AK chart.” -SteyrAUG

  4. #4
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    Range use
    A Student once said to his master: "You teach me fighting, but you talk about peace. How do you reconcile the two?"
    The master replied: "It is better to be a warrior in a garden than to be a gardener in a war."

    Gear, or rifles are only as good as the user. Even if a rifle is true to an inch at a mile, even if gear is as light as a feather, yet as durable as leather, it is limited by its user. Invest in training.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1168 View Post
    A brief IFAK packing pictorial I made. Follow link, look at the pictures and come back with questions. Remember that IFAK is an individual first aid kit, and TECC is more aid bag oriented, so some of that stuff may not fit in a belt or IBA mounted IFAK. If your CAT is still in its wrapper, you are wrong. You can attach extra CATs to MOLLE or belts with a rubber band or put it in a flashbang pouch. The guaze in my kit is Quick Clot Combat Gauze, z-folded and vacuum packed. The compression bandage/pressure dressing is a .mil issued ETD/Israeli 4” Emergency Trauma Dressing, with the outermost wrapper removed.

    https://imgur.com/gallery/fnQSjjg
    Thanks! Ill check that out, I appreciate it. Our course focused on personal aid (using basic bandages on yourself and one handed TQ application) and we also of course practiced wound packing and TQs on others.
    All my CATs are out of their packaging and have been refolded for one handed application.
    A Student once said to his master: "You teach me fighting, but you talk about peace. How do you reconcile the two?"
    The master replied: "It is better to be a warrior in a garden than to be a gardener in a war."

    Gear, or rifles are only as good as the user. Even if a rifle is true to an inch at a mile, even if gear is as light as a feather, yet as durable as leather, it is limited by its user. Invest in training.

  6. #6
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    When space-limited...
    There are smaller options for trauma dressings such as the thin packed H bandages, mini-Israelis, flat packed OLAES.
    Hemo gauze is packed small, and almost everyone makes non-hemo gauze that's vacuum packed to the size of a deck of cards or smaller. Or thinner like the Z-Pak.
    For compression, carrying small rolls of esmark, thera-band, or SWAT-Ts is much smaller than trauma dressings or control wrap/ACE.

    Nothing wrong with a bunch of wraps and gauze in lieu of packaged trauma dressings. And it's much more flexible.
    2012 National Zumba Endurance Champion
    الدهون القاع الفتيات لك جعل العالم هزاز جولة الذهاب

  7. #7
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    I ended up buying 2x NAR ETD 4" bandages, 2x Hyfin vented chest seals (dual packs), 3x Combat gauze, 2x NAR decomp needle (14GA), 2 Nasal airways and some NAR S folded compressed gauze.
    I already have some med supplies myself, like nasal airways, israeli bandages, compressed gauze, etc.
    This should fill up 2 full sized IFAKs and two small IFAKs.
    A Student once said to his master: "You teach me fighting, but you talk about peace. How do you reconcile the two?"
    The master replied: "It is better to be a warrior in a garden than to be a gardener in a war."

    Gear, or rifles are only as good as the user. Even if a rifle is true to an inch at a mile, even if gear is as light as a feather, yet as durable as leather, it is limited by its user. Invest in training.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ST911 View Post

    Nothing wrong with a bunch of wraps and gauze in lieu of packaged trauma dressings. And it's much more flexible.
    Absolutely.

    There is more than one way to acheive desired effects, and much of what is in my IFAK was chosen because it was issued for the purpose of going in a IFAK. So it is roughly standardized to what a grunt is carrying.

    In a first aid kit, CLS bag, or aid bag, it is best to consider products and devices that are versatile and adaptable to do more than one thing. For example, an ACE wrap and a couple 5x9’s can make a pretty decent pressure dressing, but also do other things better than a pre-packed pressure dressing. Such as wrap an ankle.
    RLTW

    “That is why there isn't an AK chart.” -SteyrAUG

  9. #9
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    If you're planning on using nasopharyngeal airways, a little packet of gel lubricant is a good idea. It costs almost nothing, eases the insertion of the airway, and decreases the likelihood of bleeding. If you have access to lidocaine jelly, gel, or ointment, that's even better.

  10. #10
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    Good info here already. Regular gauze can be a bit bulky and space is at a premium in most of my kits, so compressed gauze makes sense. I've had good luck with H&H Flat Compressed Gauze and recently picked up some of their Tacgauze, which looks promising. It's impressive how much gauze material can be compressed into the vacuum packed envelope.

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