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Thread: Spike's "Retro"

  1. #11
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    With all that weight forward, looks like the rifle might be a bit unbalanced. But, evidently Spike's sells enough of these to keep them in their catalog.

    With regard to the HBAR configuration itself, most folks I've talked to say that it really isn't any more accurate than other profiles. The heavier contour reduces or eliminates barrel "whip". I don't ever hear that term mentioned any more, so I'm guessing that it mainly applies to competition shooting?
    Last edited by Slater; 06-03-19 at 09:45.

  2. #12
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    And don't forget - with this you have a lot sturdier barrel for bayonet practice

  3. #13
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    Go back and review why the USMC mandated the barrel change(s) to the A2 and you’ll see the benefits of that design. You’ll also see the drawbacks. I have a Colt AR15A4 rifle but I prefer pencil barrels. Pencil barrels heat faster but also cool faster.
    Last edited by GRA556; 06-04-19 at 08:59.
    Never forget every word you spoke when you took your oath of office.

  4. #14
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    This has been discussed before, but the Army didn't agree with the A2 barrel profile. From their 1986 study:

    "The M16A2 "heavy barrel" is heavy in the wrong place. The problem with the M16A1 is a temporary bending of the barrel which occurs from the stress of various firing positions causing bullet strike to vary, e.g., the difference between a bipod firing position, and a position using a hasty sling will change the strike of the bullet at 300 meters by three to four feet or more. The "bending" takes place between the receiver and the sling swivel/ bayonet stud. The M16A2 barrel is "heavy" only from the sling swivel to the muzzle--where it can have no effect on the bending problem."

    In fact, the Army apparently found very little to like about the M16A2. Maybe they didn't care for the fact that it was a USMC initiative:

    https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a168577.pdf
    Last edited by Slater; 06-04-19 at 08:56.

  5. #15
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    My old Bushmaster A2 is .Gov profile. I have also shot the same gun with HBAR. Unless you're bench resting in some kind of competition, HBAR should be avoided.

  6. #16
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    Bushmaster used to (and maybe still does?) market their HBAR's as competition guns.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uni-Vibe View Post
    My old Bushmaster A2 is .Gov profile. I have also shot the same gun with HBAR. Unless you're bench resting in some kind of competition, HBAR should be avoided.
    Too much unnecessary weight?

    Over the years I've known a few guys that owned HBAR's (Bushies and other brands). They weren't competition guys - just weekend target shooters/plinkers. The ones I talked to seemed satisfied with the gun's accuracy, but noted that they wouldn't want to lug the thing around all day.
    Last edited by Slater; 06-04-19 at 10:51.

  8. #18
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    I think so. My A2 with govt profile weighs 7.7 pounds unloaded. Not at all unmanageable. Not quite as handy as a M4, but you could move and shoot. But the HBAR version weighs close to 9 pounds. And all that weight is out front. Fine for bench resting, but a bit much for offhand shooting. And a long way from the original M16A1.

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