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Thread: .300WM or 6.5CM? Going beyond .308/7.62

  1. #1
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    .300WM or 6.5CM? Going beyond .308/7.62

    Planning a REM700 build and not sure which caliber I should go with.

    6.5CM seems to be the bees knees now but I always liked the .300WM.
    Nullus amicus melior - Nullus inimicus perior

  2. #2
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    These are apples and oranges.

    Whatís the purpose/use?

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    If this is mainly a heavy range rifle, get what you like shooting. But I'd consider: roughly same ballistics with same projectiles, but extremely reduced recoil with the 6.5--like roughly half the recoil energy. Due to its great SD, the 6.5 is effective at deep penetration (more so than .308) and this plus the great ballistics and reduced recoil is why some service snipers are switching. You vastly increase your hit probability, like 50% at 1000 yards and that's vs .308. The .300WM would do better at 1K than .308 due to improved ballistics, but the heavy recoil takes a toll on your accuracy too.

    For all those reasons, I see no reason to take the extra ammo cost, and recoil cost, of the .300WM for a civilian rifle. If you were shooting at *really* ELR type distances, you wouldn't be using 6.5CM or .300WM, you'd be looking at other calibers anyway. I don't see much role for the .300WM in a civilian rifle now, unless you just enjoy shooting it, or doing LR hunting of larger game.
    Last edited by maximus83; 08-18-19 at 17:07.

  4. #4
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    I’ll have both set up for long range- one for steel and one for hunting. If you’re only shooting targets, 6.5 Creed. The additional cost and wear are unnecessary and the excess recoil is detrimental.
    Last edited by gunnerblue; 08-18-19 at 22:43.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by fledge View Post
    These are apples and oranges.

    What’s the purpose/use?
    ^^^ This.

  6. #6
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    Agreed...

    And what are your distances? 6.5cm doesn't come close to 300wm for delivering the goods. We're running them both, and 6.5cm just isn't as good as the hype in the last 6 months or so that we've shot it. But you're talking about a long action that's much more expensive to shoot... so it's a trade off.

    That said... if you're not going past 1000 yards, and don't want to handload, 6.5 is the easier path. You can buy that American gunner or whatever, and shoot all day long. You can't buy the type of 300 WM ammo we like. So it depends on what you're overall wants are.
    Last edited by markm; 08-19-19 at 15:41.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  7. #7
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    I have both, and do a lot of long range precision shooting/competitions, as well as long range hunting, and the two calibers you mentioned really are very different animals, for different applications.

    If all you want to do is shoot paper/steel out to 1,000 yards, and occasionally take deer or medium game within 700 yards, then the 6.5 Creed would be your better option. Cheaper to shoot, less recoil, much longer barrel life, great options for factory ammo with high BC, etc.

    If you want to hunt longer range or take larger game, like Elk and above, the 300 WM is a much better option.

    There are also other caliber options that may be even better for both of those scenarios (6mm variants for long range steel, .338 or other options for ELR or long range hunting etc), but you will usually want to be hand loading for those.

    Give use a few more details on your intended use for the rifle, and you will get the best info.

  8. #8
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    6.5 for targets and games.

    .300 for killing.


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  9. #9
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    My .02, look hard at polishing a turd and maybe into other calibers that may be easier to reload(.300wm) if going with the heavier choice. Then ask yourself what you are shooting at and how far are you shooting it.
    Your money, but I could give 2 craps of how much and who one paid it to for labor to correct a manufacturers screw up.
    GET IN YOUR BUBBLE!

  10. #10
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    ^Agree with the point about looking to another action besides R700. I just sold my last one. My R700's were all ok over the years I owned them and never had to return a single one to the factory for an issue. But....the R700 factory action is just inherently mediocre. Accuracy usually isn't great, neither is the Xmark trigger. The welded-on bolt handle is ridiculous. The extractor is weak and that's why every R700 clone replaces the extractor with a better design such as Sako-style or M16-style extractors.

    There are so many good factory rifles today that solve these problems and shoot accurately right out of the box: Tikka, Bergara, Ruger RPR, etc. I went with Tikka after finally ditching my last factory Remmy. Whatever caliber you go with, if not getting a spendy custom rifle, I'd consider checking around before getting the Remmy.

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