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Thread: Proper Buffer for 20" Rifle Gas Upper on Carbine Lower?

  1. #11
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    I shot a bunch of steel cased with a 20" BCM using H and carbine buffers without issue.

  2. #12
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    You can run any properly gassed upper on a lower with an H, H2, A5H2 or rifle buffer (used with the correct RE & spring).
    INSIDE PLAN OF BOX
    1. ROAD-RUNNER LIFTS GLASS OF WATER- PULLING UP MATCH
    2. MATCH SCRATCHES ON MATCH-BOX
    3. MATCH LIGHTS FUSE TO TNT
    4. BOOM!
    5. HA-HA!!

    -WILE E. COYOTE, AUTHOR OF "EVERYTHING I NEEDED TO KNOW IN LIFE, I LEARNED FROM GOLDBERG & MURPHY"

    http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n289/SgtSongDog/AR%20Carbine/DSC_0114.jpg
    I am American

  3. #13
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    Bumpin' this as I've changed my mind....I'd been running an 18" with a carbine buffer.

    Reliability was perfect...but in experimenting with an H2, I have to admit the gun is less jumpy, and runs more smoothly. This became very apparent when running drills like the MNQ.

    Still 100% reliable, and runs smoother this way. Will be running it with H2 going forward.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ViniVidivici View Post
    Bumpin' this as I've changed my mind....I'd been running an 18" with a carbine buffer.

    Reliability was perfect...but in experimenting with an H2, I have to admit the gun is less jumpy, and runs more smoothly. This became very apparent when running drills like the MNQ.

    Still 100% reliable, and runs smoother this way. Will be running it with H2 going forward.
    I'm slowly coming to believe that H2 is the perfect carbine buffer for everything.

  5. #15
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    I've used the standard buffer, and the H3. 20" rifle-gas 5.56. They both seem to run just fine.

    The H3 buffer is almost the same weight as the rifle buffer, around 5 oz. I believe the standard carbine spring feels a bit stiffer than the rifle spring, but that would make sense with less travel.

    Well, maybe buffer travel isn't so different when you consider the longer length of the rifle buffer.
    Last edited by MontanaMarine; 12-03-19 at 13:24.

  6. #16
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    The Army conversion kit to put a collapsible stock on a 20 inch barrel rifle, uses a standard carbine spring and an "H6" buffer.

    An H6 buffer is nothing but an H3 buffer with the weights cut to half the original length and twice as many of them. The weight for the H6 and H3 is the same, the only reason the Army uses the H6 is it works better in full auto.

  7. #17
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    H2 IIRC is what the Canadians used.
    Chief Armorer for Elite Shooting Sports in Manassas VA
    Chief Armorer for Corp Arms (FFL 07-08/SOT 02)

  8. #18
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    Yeah, I've also upgraded an 11.5" to sn H2. Have run it with an H for the last several hundred rounds, and it's also been 100% reliable, but it too is smoother with the H2.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaMarine View Post
    I've used the standard buffer, and the H3. 20" rifle-gas 5.56. They both seem to run just fine.

    The H3 buffer is almost the same weight as the rifle buffer, around 5 oz. I believe the standard carbine spring feels a bit stiffer than the rifle spring, but that would make sense with less travel.

    Well, maybe buffer travel isn't so different when you consider the longer length of the rifle buffer.
    Same travel as the bolt stroke is the same.
    The difference is the compression % of the spring. The rifle is more uniform/flat, the carbine increases resistance with travel more.

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