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Thread: What should my blood pressure be after running?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinzgauer View Post
    I'm told it's pretty typical, but my Distolic number is normally slightly lower after a workout. Your capillaries dialate, etc.

    Systolic usually varies with exertion, largely tracking heartrate. And is raised by caffeine, anxiety, etc. Distolic not so much... more determined by your physiology.

    Not a doctor, refer to one if you have questions. Just how it was explained to me by cardiac docs and nurses.

    The other thing is I see numbers 10 to 15 higher with even pro grade electronic measurement versus that done by a nurse manually. The hospital/office ones seemed to do a bit better, but you're normally sitting down and have been for a while.

    To be accurate the electronic cuff mfgs say you need to be sitting down and have not moved (walked) for 20 minutes prior.
    That's what is concerning to me, because everything I've read says the diastolic number should be either unchanged or lower after exercise, and anything more than 10 points above normal indicates that something is not right. My last after exercise diastolic numbers were about 25 points above what they should have been.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by the AR-15 Junkie View Post
    So please enlighten all of us who want to monitor our blood pressure on a daily basis at home, how are we suppose to do it lol?
    If you choose to monitor it with commercial devices at home, that's excellent, just understand that if it gives a crazy reading that it may very well be a device malfunction and not a true collection of a BP. I'm just stating that it is not as accurate as other methods and am relaying my experiences with having monitored the vitals of literally thousands of patients and being able to compare their readings at the hospital to what I collected manually.

    As chuckman stated, there is a lot of variance between devices and properly calibrated and maintained machines will work well. A $20 Walgreens special is not the same as a Phillips in a busy ER.

    Quote Originally Posted by the AR-15 Junkie View Post
    You cite one example of a geriatric living alone who cant use a blood pressure cuff, REALLY? That makes them inaccurate, oh man.
    I was trying to explain that device malfunction is a common complaint and then proceeded to supply one specific example from a recent call. As for how frequently I have someone with an inaccurate BP from a home device, it probably averages out to at least once a week depending on where I am in the city. I run that scenario more in the affluent areas. Regardless, ask any Paramedic and I'm sure their experiences will be similar...either a patient or one of their home health aides/Nurses will collect a BP using a wrist monitor and call 911 when they have an abnormal reading.

    For what it's worth, attacking the validity of my belief because I only provided one specific example is as fruitless as justifying your position because your one device is reliable and working well for you.

    I am genuinely glad you are staying on top of your health and I wish more people did, but please try to understand I'm not attacking you- I'm trying to state that these devices aren't the End All Be All that people try to make them out to be.

    I have absolutely no way of counting every time someone complains their BP is high/low and used a home device. I also have absolutely no way to count how many times a BP at the hospital that's collected with a machine is different than what I collected through auscultation. It's all a blur except for a handful of calls that stand out. In this case, I'm only remembering that specific call because the Pt was insuring that I knew how wrong I was with an onslaught of racial slurs to accompany their belief.

    And such is life. You will never respect my opinion, and that's okay, too.
    Last edited by GTF425; 09-26-19 at 17:29.

  3. #23
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    My experience is similar to GTF425’s. Automated cuffs around the bicep are reasonably trustworthy, if used correctly. They are also easy to make lie.

    Wrist cuffs are pure garbage, in my opinion. There’s a reason the one at Walgreens doesn’t have “Welch Allyn” written on it. The only “professionals” I’ve seen use them are the crooked LHI contractors that screen Reservists on their annual physicals. Wrist BP cuffs are the PSA and Bear Creek Arsenal of the medical equipment world. Just as good as.

    If you really want to know your BP and don’t want to buy expensive equipment, do it manually. Or start dating nursing students. Or, keep doing regular high quality cardio, don’t smoke, keep the caffeine reasonable, eat reasonably, and don’t worry about it unless your primary care says to.
    Last edited by 1168; 09-26-19 at 19:35. Reason: Spelling

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by the AR-15 Junkie View Post
    So please enlighten all of us who want to monitor our blood pressure on a daily basis at home, how are we suppose to do it lol?
    Do you have someone living with you? Spouse? parent? Child? Significant other of dubious and made-up gender? Spend $30, buy a manual cuff and stethoscope and learn how to use it. It's easy. If I can learn, anyone can. If you want an electronic cuff do some research. Just like ARs, they are not all 'the same' and have vast differences in reputation and quality.

    https://myaccesshealth.com/best-bloo...sure-monitors/

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 556Cliff View Post
    I have the arm cuff versions, and I try to be pretty consistent about how I use them. Though I've gone nuts with them at times, sometimes taking up to 10 readings a day. Now I usually only take 1 reading in the morning and 1 or 2 after I run.
    Maybe you should talk to a therapist.

    Yes I’m being serious.


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  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpmuscle View Post
    Maybe you should talk to a therapist.

    Yes I’m being serious.


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    Hahaha! That's not the first time that I've heard that, not just in regard to how often I take my blood pressure either.

    Anyways, I've been using a Microlife arm cuff BP monitor for awhile now and got a reading of 113/64 with a 54 pulse this morning which is not unusual, but my systolic number is usually in the low to mid 120s. After a run my systolic number can be up into the mid to high 130s and sometimes low 140s. I was using an Omron arm cuff BP monitor and it would usually read my BP just a little bit lower. So I've been using the Micro life mostly because it gives me ever so slightly higher readings.

    I still haven't felt that great since that last run I did though, and now I'm kind of afraid to go on my next run. I'm not the fastest runner either, lately it takes me about 46/47 minutes to run 5 miles and I'm usually feeling dead on the return half.
    Last edited by 556Cliff; 09-27-19 at 10:48.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by 556Cliff View Post
    Hahaha! That's not the first time that I've heard that, not just in regard to how often I take my blood pressure either.

    Anyways, I've been using a Microlife arm cuff BP monitor for awhile now and got a reading of 113/64 with a 54 pulse this morning which is not unusual, but my systolic number is usually in the low to mid 120s. After a run my systolic number can be up into the mid to high 130s and sometimes low 140s. I was using an Omron arm cuff BP monitor and it would usually read my BP just a little bit lower. So I've been using the Micro life mostly because it gives me ever so slightly higher readings.

    I still haven't felt that great since that last run I did though, and now I'm kind of afraid to go on my next run. I'm not the fastest runner either, lately it takes me about 46/47 minutes to run 5 miles and I'm usually feeling dead on the return half.
    OK. Dude, relax. R. E. L. A. X. You are 9-minutes and change for 5 miles. How about this: get good sleep, don't eat a lot of shit (some shit is fine), don't drink too much, don't do drugs, and see your doc once a year for a physical and labs.

    BPs are only good looking at trends. When you get up. Before you eat. After you eat. Before and after dropping a deuce. Before and after getting it on. Before and after a run. When it rains. When it's hot. When the apocalypse is nigh upon us. Take the numbers, mash them up, divide. Look at the American Heart Association tables for normal.

    I am telling you this: your anxiety and OCD about it WILL make it, and you, worse.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckman View Post
    OK. Dude, relax. R. E. L. A. X. You are 9-minutes and change for 5 miles. How about this: get good sleep, don't eat a lot of shit (some shit is fine), don't drink too much, don't do drugs, and see your doc once a year for a physical and labs.

    BPs are only good looking at trends. When you get up. Before you eat. After you eat. Before and after dropping a deuce. Before and after getting it on. Before and after a run. When it rains. When it's hot. When the apocalypse is nigh upon us. Take the numbers, mash them up, divide. Look at the American Heart Association tables for normal.

    I am telling you this: your anxiety and OCD about it WILL make it, and you, worse.
    Okay, I'll try to cool it with my OCD about all this since that is turning out to be the general consensus... It won't be easy though.

    I've never smoked, I've never been on drugs and I've never really been into alcohol except for the last few years, I wouldn't consider myself an alcoholic but I'm trying to cut back on that anyway. My eating habits have definitely improved since about 2015/16 too.

  9. #29
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    If your going to be OCD about anything I’d vote for nutrition


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  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpmuscle View Post
    If your going to be OCD about anything I’d vote for nutrition


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    I agree, that's probably the hardest thing to keep on top of unfortunately.

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