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Thread: Moving in Camouflage

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    Moving in Camouflage

    I subscribe to some European "Woodcraft" channels on youtube. This is sort of like camping, backpacking, wilderness survival rolled into one. A subset of this woodcraft is stealth camping. This means camping near other campers but remaining undetected by them. This is a thing in Germany and Austria, maybe all over Europe and there are videos on it.

    In discussing stealth camping, the subject of camouflage came up. Of course they have great camo available to them in Germany but this person told me words like---Camouflage is great if you remain stationary but if you are moving, solid colors are less detectable.

    At first, I dismissed this but then thought about it. If you got an average of the green of your particular forest, for example, that might "flash" less than the multi-color camo if you were moving. And when would you move? Going from cover to cover or just trying to get to cover in the first place---the most vulnerable of all situations.

    The Marines in Vietnam used a solid green color. Was this the reason? What do you think of the idea that camo is more detectable moving than solid colors? Is this person right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Bullseye View Post
    I subscribe to some European "Woodcraft" channels on youtube. This is sort of like camping, backpacking, wilderness survival rolled into one. A subset of this woodcraft is stealth camping. This means camping near other campers but remaining undetected by them. This is a thing in Germany and Austria, maybe all over Europe and there are videos on it.

    In discussing stealth camping, the subject of camouflage came up. Of course they have great camo available to them in Germany but this person told me words like---Camouflage is great if you remain stationary but if you are moving, solid colors are less detectable.

    At first, I dismissed this but then thought about it. If you got an average of the green of your particular forest, for example, that might "flash" less than the multi-color camo if you were moving. And when would you move? Going from cover to cover or just trying to get to cover in the first place---the most vulnerable of all situations.

    The Marines in Vietnam used a solid green color. Was this the reason? What do you think of the idea that camo is more detectable moving than solid colors? Is this person right?
    Having bowhunted deer for 25+ years these are my observations:

    Learn to move when your prey is not looking or their view of you is blocked by a tree, bush, etc... Learning to draw a bow when there are 6 skittish whitetails standing around will teach this. Move slowly and avoid fast, jerky movements. Movement will get you busted quickly.

    I've found that camo with neutral colors that break up my outline has been most effective in getting close to game. Natural Gear has been my favorite for general use.

    I can see how solids can be effective - watch a deer walk slowly through the woods and they can be difficult to see. One stands still and they are even more difficult to see. If you aren't looking for them it is easy to miss them altogether- their khaki/brown blends in that well.
    Last edited by flenna; 09-26-19 at 18:34.
    Psalm 34:19

    To argue with a person who renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead. ~ Thomas Paine

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Bullseye View Post
    I subscribe to some European "Woodcraft" channels on youtube. This is sort of like camping, backpacking, wilderness survival rolled into one. A subset of this woodcraft is stealth camping. This means camping near other campers but remaining undetected by them. This is a thing in Germany and Austria, maybe all over Europe and there are videos on it.
    Ok that sounds like a really creepy fetish. Not going to lie.

    Value in the skill set but damn that’s a lil weird no?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    “Answer The Bell...” J.W.

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    In Europe and Scandinavia the laws often are a little different. People are allowed to camp on land without obtaining permission as long as it's 50 or 100 m from buildings or similar.

    There are typically restrictions on noise, fire size and such.

    Their laws about public transit on land are a bit different.

    Some countries it's just culturally accepted as reasonable. In others they are not happy about it but the law allows it.

    I could see stealth or low key camping as being a thing there.

    I just took down a tent someone left on my back property, probably kids but someone was camping. If they had asked I would have given them permission with some conditions.

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    Whether it is creepy or what the laws are in Europe is not the point. Deer are not the point. The questions is if you think this person's observation is valid and, again, that observation is that it is easier FOR A HUMAN to spot someone moving in camo than in solid colors which match the environment.

    Is this true or not?

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    Going to go with doubting it.


    Trying to think of animals and where they live, but seems like a fairly even mix of solid vs. Patterned colors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Bullseye View Post
    Whether it is creepy or what the laws are in Europe is not the point. Deer are not the point. The questions is if you think this person's observation is valid and, again, that observation is that it is easier FOR A HUMAN to spot someone moving in camo than in solid colors which match the environment.

    Is this true or not?
    I understand deer are not the point, just giving my observations from spending a lot of time in the woods. Short answer- moving while being in a person's field of view will get you busted no matter what you are wearing. A good camouflage that breaks up your outline will make it more difficult for a person to determine what they are actually seeing move.
    Psalm 34:19

    To argue with a person who renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead. ~ Thomas Paine

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    Quote Originally Posted by flenna View Post
    Having bowhunted deer for 25+ years these are my observations:

    Learn to move when your prey is not looking or their view of you is blocked by a tree, bush, etc... Learning to draw a bow when there are 6 skittish whitetails standing around will teach this. Move slowly and avoid fast, jerky movements. Movement will get you busted quickly.

    I've found that camo with neutral colors that break up my outline has been most effective in getting close to game. Natural Gear has been my favorite for general use.

    I can see how solids can be effective - watch a deer walk slowly through the woods and they can be difficult to see. One stands still and they are even more difficult to see. If you aren't looking for them it is easy to miss them altogether- their khaki/brown blends in that well.
    Do the deer down there usually start turning grey as the weather gets colder?

    An oddity, saw one Wednesday evening while setting stands that was very dark grey...much darker than any I recall seeing before.

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    Deer in Georgia go from a very particular light brown with a hint of red to almost completely gray in the winter.

    It's a very distinct color change, they must shed their guard hairs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pinzgauer View Post
    Deer in Georgia go from a very particular light brown with a hint of red to almost completely gray in the winter.

    It's a very distinct color change, they must shed their guard hairs.
    Same here. They go to a dark grey in the winter.
    Psalm 34:19

    To argue with a person who renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead. ~ Thomas Paine

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