Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: Is a Ruger GP-100 a solid .357 investment?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,345
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by pinzgauer View Post
    Having owned and shot K frames in 357 extensively, they will shoot themselves loose with a steady diet of hot 357. As do 29s in 44 mag. If you plan to shoot it a bunch I'd go with the ruger.

    I'd shoot full house 125s very sparingly in any revolver. In my 686, I won't fire a one. Stick with 158s, which is what the gun was designed for.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    273
    Feedback Score
    0
    Mine is about 20 years old and has well over 10,000 rounds through it.
    Played gun games with it for a while.

    The Ruger doesn't peen the cylinder notches the way a Smith does when used for racing.

    The cylinder latch is not a handicap vs a standard Smith but the Smith can be enhanced, the Ruger no so much.

    Go shoot the heck out of it. Your wrist (or your wallet) should wear out before the GP-100 does.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    3,091
    Feedback Score
    0
    I have abused a .357 Blackhawk, the first pistol I bought, since the 1980s.

    I have had the GP’s beefier cousin, the Redhawk, for a much shorter time. Shooting 45ACP in moon lips or speedloader fed 45 Colt.

    They are solid and durable.
    “Where weapons may not be carried, it is well to carry weapons.”

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    3
    Feedback Score
    0
    I have a 3” GP-100 in .357 and have really been satisfied with this ultra reliable revolver. I have changed preferences from
    semi automatic pistols to revolvers. For me, they are more fun. I even like single actions since for me they help my concentration, and I believe my accuracy. OP, congratulations on your GP 100. You can load anything from hot .357 magnums to good old .38 special lead bullets!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    ROCKET CITY, USA
    Posts
    2,885
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    [QUOTE=Uni-Vibe;2786816]I'd shoot full house 125s very sparingly in any revolver. In my 686, I won't fire a one. Stick with 158s, which is what the gun was designed for.[/QUOTE

    What? You wont shoot 125's thru a 686? Thats the stupidest thing I ever heard. That revolver was DESIGNED to shoot tons of loads like that. Bought my first one out of boot camp in Feb of 84. Had a few since. That is literally complete horseshit to say "158's are what the gun was designed for"...whether talking about the 686 or the Ruger. Had several Rugers. Shot Lord knows how many 125's & everything else out of them.
    Anyone that does even a cursory search knows that 125gr. 357 is one of the top "one shot stoppers" of handgun loads. Its what most depts. issued, and what most people use for SD.
    Much info on this on this forum from past highly regarded individuals, as well as many other places.
    This is yet ANOTHER post of yours with BULLSHIT information. You need to stop.
    " Be NOT ye afraid of them..
    Remember the Lord, for He is GREAT & TERRIBLE!
    FIGHT for your bretheren..for your sons & for your daughters,
    for your wives & for your households"!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,345
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)
    All firearms are originally designed with a certain bullet weight and pressure in mind. This translates into the familiar default loading.

    For example, the .38 spl was designed for a 158 grain lead round nose at 750 fps. The .45 ACP was designed for 230 grain jacketed at about 830 fps. The M4 was designed for 62 grains at about 3100 fps. This is true of all cartridges. Nontrivial deviations can cause reliability problems or premature wear.

    The .357 mag was designed for a 158 grain LSWC. It's a question of timing. By the time the 158 gets going, a certain amount of powder has burned. With the hot 125s, they get going quicker. Too much of the powder is still burning. This can cause damage to weaker guns such as the Smith model 19, which was designed to be light enough for policemen to carry. It's more or less a .38 that will shoot some .357. Forcing cone damage and flame cutting are known side effects.

    Now, it may be, and I believe it is, true that my 686 and the GP100 are stronger guns that will handle more hot 125s.

    Still, I try to stick close to the original loadings in guns, unless I have a reason to deviate.
    Last edited by Uni-Vibe; 12-24-19 at 16:01.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    The Sticks, TN
    Posts
    2,238
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Uni-Vibe View Post
    I'd shoot full house 125s very sparingly in any revolver. In my 686, I won't fire a one. Stick with 158s, which is what the gun was designed for.
    Huh?? Like Straight Shooter said, the L-frame was designed specifically to shoot full power magnums. All day long. The 125 grain SJHP is THE definitive self defense load in .357 magnum.
    Psalm 34:19

    To argue with a person who renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead. ~ Thomas Paine

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Lowcountry, SC.
    Posts
    2,251
    Feedback Score
    9 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Uni-Vibe View Post
    All firearms are originally designed with a certain bullet weight and pressure in mind. This translates into the familiar default loading.

    For example, the .38 spl was designed for a 158 grain lead round nose at 750 fps. The .45 ACP was designed for 230 grain jacketed at about 830 fps. The M4 was designed for 62 grains at about 3100 fps. This is true of all cartridges. Nontrivial deviations can cause reliability problems or premature wear.

    The .357 mag was designed for a 158 grain LSWC. It's a question of timing. By the time the 158 gets going, a certain amount of powder has burned. With the hot 125s, they get going quicker. Too much of the powder is still burning. This can cause damage to weaker guns such as the Smith model 19, which was designed to be light enough for policemen to carry. It's more or less a .38 that will shoot some .357. Forcing cone damage and flame cutting are known side effects.

    Now, it may be, and I believe it is, true that my 686 and the GP100 are stronger guns that will handle more hot 125s.

    Still, I try to stick close to the original loadings in guns, unless I have a reason to deviate.
    Merry Christmas, UniVibe, and to all on M4C.
    RLTW

    “Guys with LPVOs, lasers, and night vision have been killing the dogs**t out of dudes with just iron sights at night with great regularity for about 25 years now.”
    -Jack Leuba /Failure2Stop

    “I mean, I get it, you're mad, send me your address, and I'll send you a red cape so then you can be Super Mad.” -Five_Point_Five_Six

    “Yep, it's definite. I simply don't care enough what you think.” -SteyrAug

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,217
    Feedback Score
    12 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Uni-Vibe View Post
    I'd shoot full house 125s very sparingly in any revolver. In my 686, I won't fire a one. Stick with 158s, which is what the gun was designed for.
    Not to be pedantic, but the only companies making "full house" 125s anymore are those like Buffalo Bore. Most of the 125gr stuff you can get today is lower pressure and lower velocity. 125gr was meant to be higher velocity than it is today and most ballistic tests I've seen would support that as they're usually pretty "meh" performance-wise - on par with 115 +p+ 9mm loads. Even if you were shooting older 125 loads, it's much less of a concern from an L frame than a K. 19s and 66s were prolific when the hotter 125gr was de rigueur for a duty round, which is probably why the "shoot itself loose" thing came about.

    To the OP: I don't think there's much "investment" potential, at least like there is with older Smiths and Colts. They're a workhorse revolver. I used to borrow a 6" GP100 when shotgun hunting and that thing was a tank. Handled .357 loads really well and the lockup was bank-vault tight, but the trigger wasn't as nice a 686. I have no doubt you could put 10,000 rounds of .357 through it without it being much worse for wear.
    Last edited by sundance435; 12-27-19 at 13:16.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    273
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by sundance435 View Post
    Not to be pedantic, but the only companies making "full house" 125s anymore are those like Buffalo Bore. Most of the 125gr stuff you can get today is lower pressure and lower velocity. 125gr was meant to be higher velocity than it is today and most ballistic tests I've seen would support that as they're usually pretty "meh" performance-wise - on par with 115 +p+ 9mm loads. Even if you were shooting older 125 loads, it's much less of a concern from an L frame than a K. 19s and 66s were prolific when the hotter 125gr was de rigueur for a duty round, which is probably why the "shoot itself loose" thing came about.
    If you have a vintage K-frame to compare to an L or N-frame, you can see the end of the K-frame barrel (where protrudes into the cylinder window) has a flat cut on it at about the 6 o'clock position. This is to make room for the yoke when it is locked into the frame. Where the flat spot comes closest to the forcing cone is noticeably thinner. This thin spot has been known to split and is attributed to magnum loads with light bullets. This led to to the general advice about using 125s sparingly.
    When Smith designed the L-frame, they made sure that the frame size would accommodate room for the barrel and yoke without having to compromise on one or the other. The L-frame can handle anything that meets 357 magnum specifications.

    Also note that Smith has re-designed the K-frame. Newer ones are not constructed the same (2-piece barrel and different yoke construction/ball detent lockup) and do not have the flat at 6 o'clock.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •