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Thread: Great post about revolver reliability - Part 2 added

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jh9 View Post
    If the audience is a bunch of Glock guys racking up instructor hours who probably won't shoot more than a few rounds through a J-frame now and again, then that's fair.

    If the prereq to even be in the class is a ton of Instructor Development hours then I would have thought the analogue to the 1911 would have come up. In that, they're really "enthusiast's pistols" and that comes with learning, to some degree, to be your own gunsmith. Which for the newer S&Ws, is easier than it used to be.

    Just out of curiosity do you know if the guns having light strikes had "factory equivalent" spring kits in them? And if they had the firing pin on the hammer or frame?
    I would say that most of the people in that class had over a 1000 hours of instruction/training with pistols. I am north of that, myself. Most of them I know personally and have trained with multiple times. I know at least five of them have over 3000 hours.

    I know that two of the guns that had light strikes were using the same batch of European ammo (S&B) that is known for harder primers.

    And I follow you on how a firing pin nose makes a real difference compared to a fixed firing pin. One of the "issues" was with a GP-100 with the framed-mounted pin and a transfer bar. I looked at the other, and made sure that the strain screw was not backed out, I think we have all seen snake-oil gunsmiths who back out the strain screw, and call that a "trigger job". Both of those shooters are very highly skilled, and good friends. Frankly, it was just a batch of ammo with hard primers.

    We were running pretty fast and furious in class. So when a shooter had an issue, they simply pitched the gun in a bag and grabbed a different one. If they still had an issue, the ammo was suspect. If they did not, then it was likely that revolver. I bought over a dozen revolvers to the class, as did another person. There were lots to go around, believe me.

    My intention with this participating in this thread is not to cast blame, or sling poo. I just want to point out that I was one of the people on the range, passed the class, and am what I would consider a dedicated and skilled revolver shooter. I have insight into what makes them run well, and what makes them not run at all.

    As a fer instance, I spent a year dragging a factory S&W 686 to pistol classes. I was always the only wheelgun in a class full of Glocks and M&P's. And I'd usually finish in the upper half of the class. I got REALLY good with Safariland speedloaders.

    I did it not to be an asshole, but to really learn how to improve my double-action trigger work. It also made me much more skilled with a Glock (striker-fired) or a Beretta (DA/SA). That's why I did it.

    Revolvers have a place. They make an excellent teaching gun to help people overcome a flinch. They make a great complimentary weapon to a primary large-capacity semi-auto. They make a useful pistol for people with an unusual hand structure, since the stocks are so varied. They make a great weapon for shooting with a compromised grip.

    Tools are tools. Know the limitations of the tool and yourself, and you have an edge. Ignore both, and you are a fool.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeriousStudent View Post
    I would say that most of the people in that class had over a 1000 hours of instruction/training with pistols. I am north of that, myself. Most of them I know personally and have trained with multiple times. I know at least five of them have over 3000 hours.

    I know that two of the guns that had light strikes were using the same batch of European ammo (S&B) that is known for harder primers.

    And I follow you on how a firing pin nose makes a real difference compared to a fixed firing pin. One of the "issues" was with a GP-100 with the framed-mounted pin and a transfer bar. I looked at the other, and made sure that the strain screw was not backed out, I think we have all seen snake-oil gunsmiths who back out the strain screw, and call that a "trigger job". Both of those shooters are very highly skilled, and good friends. Frankly, it was just a batch of ammo with hard primers.

    We were running pretty fast and furious in class. So when a shooter had an issue, they simply pitched the gun in a bag and grabbed a different one. If they still had an issue, the ammo was suspect. If they did not, then it was likely that revolver. I bought over a dozen revolvers to the class, as did another person. There were lots to go around, believe me.

    My intention with this participating in this thread is not to cast blame, or sling poo. I just want to point out that I was one of the people on the range, passed the class, and am what I would consider a dedicated and skilled revolver shooter. I have insight into what makes them run well, and what makes them not run at all.

    As a fer instance, I spent a year dragging a factory S&W 686 to pistol classes. I was always the only wheelgun in a class full of Glocks and M&P's. And I'd usually finish in the upper half of the class. I got REALLY good with Safariland speedloaders.

    I did it not to be an asshole, but to really learn how to improve my double-action trigger work. It also made me much more skilled with a Glock (striker-fired) or a Beretta (DA/SA). That's why I did it.

    Revolvers have a place. They make an excellent teaching gun to help people overcome a flinch. They make a great complimentary weapon to a primary large-capacity semi-auto. They make a useful pistol for people with an unusual hand structure, since the stocks are so varied. They make a great weapon for shooting with a compromised grip.

    Tools are tools. Know the limitations of the tool and yourself, and you have an edge. Ignore both, and you are a fool.
    That’s another great point. When competing with an auto, I’d bring a few spare parts. When I competed with revos, I and everyone I knew who were serious brought spare guns.
    What if this whole crusade's a charade?
    And behind it all there's a price to be paid
    For the blood which we dine
    Justified in the name of the holy and the divine…

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by glocktogo View Post
    That’s another great point. When competing with an auto, I’d bring a few spare parts. When I competed with revos, I and everyone I knew who were serious brought spare guns.
    I bring spare auto's, too.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by glocktogo View Post
    That’s another great point. When competing with an auto, I’d bring a few spare parts. When I competed with revos, I and everyone I knew who were serious brought spare guns.
    Lawmen who had to use revolvers brought extra guns to high-stress work, i.e. door-kicking. This was the New York Reload. They don't do that with autos. If you carry a revolver, you will get killed when you run out of ammo in 5 or 6 shots. The guy next to you with a Glock or M&P will still be firing.

  5. #15
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    Wearing a J-frame BUG now.
    I've broken parts on a few Js, one during a class. Good thing I had a spare.
    Great article by DB.
    2012 National Zumba Endurance Champion
    الدهون القاع الفتيات لك جعل العالم هزاز جولة الذهاب

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uni-Vibe View Post
    If you carry a revolver, you will get killed when you run out of ammo in 5 or 6 shots.
    Ah. There it is. Revolvers will get you kilt in the streetz.

    I was hoping we'd get there.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jh9 View Post
    Ah. There it is. Revolvers will get you kilt in the streetz.

    I was hoping we'd get there.
    Sure. How many people who have been in gunfights said afterwards, "I should have brought only a revolver. I had extra ammo left over in this semi." None.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uni-Vibe View Post
    Lawmen who had to use revolvers brought extra guns to high-stress work, i.e. door-kicking. This was the New York Reload. They don't do that with autos. If you carry a revolver, you will get killed when you run out of ammo in 5 or 6 shots. The guy next to you with a Glock or M&P will still be firing.
    What if the guy next to you with the M&P or Glock happened to get hit first? I mean autos aren't bullet proof vests.

    Lawmen today who do door kicking still bring extra guns. Rifle in hand, handgun in holster!

    And why are gun fights always against a numerically superior adversary? Can't be like one guy? Mad Max isn't reality!

    Bout 10 years ago we had a shooting here. Guy defended himself with a 5 shot 38 against a group of thugs. He shot one thug several times as all the rest ran away!
    Last edited by Arik; 11-22-19 at 21:49.

  9. #19
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    Yankee refugee living in the free state of West Virginia.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce in WV View Post
    From the article:

    "Buy your ticket and ride the choice and consequences train."

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