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Thread: Small vs Large Rear Sight Aperture

  1. #1
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    Small vs Large Rear Sight Aperture

    The sole carbine class I attended addressed this topic clearly by stating that for most engagements (writhing 200yd), the larger aperture should be used.

    It makes sense to me, and though perhaps a little less finely accurate, it does seem to permit quicker shots at closer distances.

    What do you all do, and why?
    “God doesn’t need your good works, but your neighbor does.” - Luther

  2. #2
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    I've always used the small aperture based on how I was trained. The large was used for night/low light engagements.

    I've toyed with using the large aperture in normal shooting from time to time and I do see accuracy suffer...not terrible but it's there. However, I do see the benefit of having a larger overall sight picture using it for up close shots.

  3. #3
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    Big one---in woods with 100 yards visibility or less
    Small one---in more open, parkland environment where longer shots are possible.

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    Interestingly enough the base of the large aperture on the M16A2 was marked 0-2. I was told that meant 0-2 yards. However, I also taught to use the small aperture for zeroing and qualifying. Then, when I finally got an M4 the BUIS only had 1 aperture and that ended any debate.

  5. #5
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    The M-16 A2 and M4 carry handle 0-200 large aperture is not on the same plane as the smaller, and I "think" the same holds true for the DD fixed rear sight. I believe the Troy rears are same plane.

    In my experience, the larger aperture is much faster at short range and much easier to use in low light.

    I definitely prefer a larger aperture on BUIS than the Matech offers and I drilled out the one I am using on my "M4". The Troy flip up sight is made to fold with the large aperture selected.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyLate View Post
    The M-16 A2 and M4 carry handle 0-200 large aperture is not on the same plane as the smaller, and I "think" the same holds true for the DD fixed rear sight. I believe the Troy rears are same plane.
    That’s the way I understand it. Any idea about Magpuls?



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    I'm surprised this isn't more widely known. And it should be obvious to anyone who's looked thru both.

    The Large Aperture (often called "Skirmish Sights) are for up close & quick shooting. The Small Aperture is for more precise shooting. Obtaining a good sight picture with the small aperture requires more precision and often more time.

  8. #8
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    My rifle is set up only with Troy irons. I shoot both apertures equally as well out to 200yrds but find the larger aperture much faster to bring to bear so I pretty much just leave it there. The Troy's are same plane so there is no range change with aperture. Some of this may be due to the HK front more or less naturally centering up with the rear sight, not sure but that is my hunch.

  9. #9
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    I have Troy front & rear BUIS on my 16". I zeroed them @ 50 yards with the large aperture. Where would I hit @ 50 yards if I used the small aperture?

  10. #10
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    ^^ " there is no range change with aperture"- this.

    Dial in with small aperture, use small for distance/precision.
    Large for low light/flash sight picture/speed of engagement.
    A true "Gun Guy" (or gal) should have familiarity and a modicum of proficiency with most all firearms platforms, as well as the major Food Groups.

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