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Thread: What is the most important training you've received?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by CAMagnussen View Post
    If I had to point to a single training class I would say it was Larry Vicker's basic handgun class. Why? Larry is a superb instructor. He has his syllabus down to a science. And...he helped me overcome my deficiency with the Glock's trigger and instilled in me lifetime/lifelong skills I can continue to practice. I've since taken at least half-a dozen classes with Vickers and they have all been superb. The first one was the real eye-opener/light bulb moments for me. The trigger issues and his discussion of "trust the wobble" on sight picture were key for me and you can not recreate these things "virtually" via YouTube videos.
    Good stuff. I haven't had the opportunity to take one of his classes, but I'd like to someday. I have a few instructors on my "bucket list." I'm not even gonna go near YouTube commandos.

    Quote Originally Posted by SeriousStudent View Post
    My Advanced Electrocardiography class back in 1982, when I was studying to become a Flight Paramedic.

    I probably saved more lives with what I learned, then any other training I have received before or since.

    The gun stuff is nice. But learning how to deal with hydraulic fluid problems - that is a handy thing to know.
    Interesting. What was it about that particular course that helped so much? I'm pretty illiterate with that type of medical device, so I'm genuinely curious.
    "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing." -Edmund Burke

    "It is better to be thought a fool and to remain silent, than to speak and remove all doubt." -Abraham Lincoln

  2. #12
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    They teach you where to put wires on people's chests. Then you see all those cool squiggly lines on an itty bitty monitor screen, just like on TV. Loved that stuff when I was a kid.

    After that, you decide if you should pump them full of drugs or administer some "Edison Medicine". Very spiffy.

    They also teach you to avoid saying things like "Arise, Lazurus!" and stuff like that.

  3. #13
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    Iíd say the two stand outs for me were Rogers Shooting School and High Risk Warrant.

    Both were brutal and both really slowed my roll.

    The Rogers course cut zero slack. You either hit steel or you didnít. It was totally skill and speed based.

    It made me rethink caliber, sights, holster, and my own coordination.

    Lights will always be more useful than nightsights. I think to an extent and for the truly switched on that night sights are kinda pointless in lieu of a good WML that simultaneously blinds, disorients, gives positive ID, and acts as a reference point for flash shooting. Your rounds are gonna go where the light goes. Especially close in.

    I say High Risk service because it showed a LOT of dirty tricks when going into a structure that most people donít consider and how fast things can go. If you can master a good entry and have a good rhythm then half the battle is won right there. ďViolence of ActionĒ gets overused as a term but itís true and it works.

    Thatís what helped me.

    As I age, thereís more Iíd like to do on Trauma side if not matriculate that way

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeriousStudent View Post
    They teach you where to put wires on people's chests. Then you see all those cool squiggly lines on an itty bitty monitor screen, just like on TV. Loved that stuff when I was a kid.

    After that, you decide if you should pump them full of drugs or administer some "Edison Medicine". Very spiffy.

    They also teach you to avoid saying things like "Arise, Lazurus!" and stuff like that.


    Quote Originally Posted by Firefly View Post
    I’d say the two stand outs for me were Rogers Shooting School and High Risk Warrant.

    Both were brutal and both really slowed my roll.

    The Rogers course cut zero slack. You either hit steel or you didn’t. It was totally skill and speed based.

    It made me rethink caliber, sights, holster, and my own coordination.

    Lights will always be more useful than nightsights. I think to an extent and for the truly switched on that night sights are kinda pointless in lieu of a good WML that simultaneously blinds, disorients, gives positive ID, and acts as a reference point for flash shooting. Your rounds are gonna go where the light goes. Especially close in.

    I say High Risk service because it showed a LOT of dirty tricks when going into a structure that most people don’t consider and how fast things can go. If you can master a good entry and have a good rhythm then half the battle is won right there. “Violence of Action” gets overused as a term but it’s true and it works.

    That’s what helped me.

    As I age, there’s more I’d like to do on Trauma side if not matriculate that way
    The Rogers course sounds like one of those that would make me a little humbler. HRW sounds like it would be fun.
    Last edited by echo5whiskey; 11-27-19 at 17:09.
    "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing." -Edmund Burke

    "It is better to be thought a fool and to remain silent, than to speak and remove all doubt." -Abraham Lincoln

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    The course to get certified as a tactical paramedic. It was quite a lot of force on force and team movement in close quarters. We were all seasoned paramedics and had a pretty decent skill base for weapons handling and employment. The idea is to have us qualified to be the team "doc" if needed, either on scene or in the stack with them.

    In addition to structure clearing, weapon employment and using medical skills, we had the opportunity to play the bad guy. Granted, we knew a bunch of armed guys were about to boot our door but we could easily be an average Joe sitting at home watching TV and armed robbers break in. You realize the pros/cons to your home setup should a crime like that happen.

    What got me was they fully admit they play paintball and airsoft in street clothes as part of staying fresh with team skills. It started as just something fun to do. They quickly discovered kids communicate and coordinate far better than a bunch of trained, type A adults with egos. If they aren't careful they get their asses kicked by a bunch of children. They now do it on the regular to not only have fun but train. Hearing that made me realize no matter how "above it" you think you are, the basics matter or they get forgotten.

    The entire process gave me a whole new of skills that do translate elsewhere. The importance of having a medical kit that's easy to access and contains the right tools led to make some changes in what I carry around on a regular basis.

  6. #16
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    For me, probably the CCW course when I first got into handguns. The instructor emphasized NOT shooting people which is how it should be. Not exactly what I expected and explaining when and how you can shoot someone and not go to jail. Which is tuff to do.

    PB
    "Air Force / Policeman / Fireman / Man of God / Friend of mine / R.I.P. Steve Lamy"

  7. #17
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    The school of hard knocks growing up on the streets of NYC. Learn fast, or perish.

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    Trauma/first aid. Learning how to use all the neat stuff in the IFAK.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by StovePipe_Jammer View Post
    The course to get certified as a tactical paramedic. It was quite a lot of force on force and team movement in close quarters. We were all seasoned paramedics and had a pretty decent skill base for weapons handling and employment. The idea is to have us qualified to be the team "doc" if needed, either on scene or in the stack with them.

    In addition to structure clearing, weapon employment and using medical skills, we had the opportunity to play the bad guy. Granted, we knew a bunch of armed guys were about to boot our door but we could easily be an average Joe sitting at home watching TV and armed robbers break in. You realize the pros/cons to your home setup should a crime like that happen.

    What got me was they fully admit they play paintball and airsoft in street clothes as part of staying fresh with team skills. It started as just something fun to do. They quickly discovered kids communicate and coordinate far better than a bunch of trained, type A adults with egos. If they aren't careful they get their asses kicked by a bunch of children. They now do it on the regular to not only have fun but train. Hearing that made me realize no matter how "above it" you think you are, the basics matter or they get forgotten.

    The entire process gave me a whole new of skills that do translate elsewhere. The importance of having a medical kit that's easy to access and contains the right tools led to make some changes in what I carry around on a regular basis.
    Sounds like some good training. At some point I'd like to attend another first aid course. Back when I went through CLS, there were a bunch of myths and legends tossed into the training. Brilliance in the basics is a concept everyone (myself included) most likely needs to remember more.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pappabear View Post
    For me, probably the CCW course when I first got into handguns. The instructor emphasized NOT shooting people which is how it should be. Not exactly what I expected and explaining when and how you can shoot someone and not go to jail. Which is tuff to do.

    PB
    I try emphasize that same part of the curriculum I teach. I've had a lot of students with that same reaction. I have remind them that a concealed carry license is not 007's license to kill.

    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    The school of hard knocks growing up on the streets of NYC. Learn fast, or perish.
    Now THAT'S some great training. I'm working on a project right now. Mind if I PM you in the coming days?

    Quote Originally Posted by deanq View Post
    Trauma/first aid. Learning how to use all the neat stuff in the IFAK.
    I enjoyed that too, when I was active duty. I probably need to take a refresher.
    "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing." -Edmund Burke

    "It is better to be thought a fool and to remain silent, than to speak and remove all doubt." -Abraham Lincoln

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by echo5whiskey View Post
    Now THAT'S some great training. I'm working on a project right now. Mind if I PM you in the coming days?
    Anytime. There is no substitute for the real world.

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