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Thread: Front Squat Question

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by sndt1319 View Post
    I went back to lifting to start prepping for the ACFT after recovering from a surgery (out and back into the theater). We don't have any trap bars here so I figured the squat and deadlift combo would be the way to go. I started with low weight and promptly threw my back out doing squats. I'm in a very low-density MOS so I'm the only person from my unit here. I don't have a battle for my workouts.
    See this excellent video from Dr. Jordon Feigenbaum's (Barbell Medicine) recent presentation on low back pain injury and preparing for the ACFT:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9poXGU11ms

    The short answer to the question of how best to prepare for the trap bar portion would be to do the same movements over a linear progression (increasing weight over time), with the same/similar equipment to prepare for the test. I realize that may not be possible in your situation. If it were me and I had to prepare without a trap bar I would low-bar squat and deadlift using the same form taught in the Starting Strength method. The main thing you want would want to learn is how to properly set your low back. Lots of videos on that. The cues a coach would use is "chest up" and "drop your belly between your thighs". You also want to make sure you're looking out about 4 to 6 feet in front of you.

    Good luck on your test!
    Last edited by n517rv; 12-24-19 at 20:45.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by n517rv View Post
    See this excellent video from Dr. Jordon Feigenbaum's (Barbell Medicine) recent presentation on low back pain injury and preparing for the ACFT:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9poXGU11ms

    The short answer to the question of how best to prepare for the trap bar portion would be to do the same movements over a linear progression (increasing weight over time), with the same/similar equipment to prepare for the test. I realize that may not be possible in your situation. If it were me and I had to prepare without a trap bar I would low-bar squat and deadlift using the same form taught in the Starting Strength method. The main thing you want would want to learn is how to properly set your back. Lots of videos on that. The cues a coach would use is "chest up" and "drop your belly between your thighs". You also want to make sure you're looking out about 10-15 feet in front of you.

    Good luck on your test!
    I would add the importance of keeping your low back set when you set the weight down. A lot of people tend to relax the upper back essentially rounding the back to begin to lower the weight. It is very important to keep the back tight. A cue for this would be to think of sticking your butt out when you begin to lower the weight.

  3. #23
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    Your source never defines what squat variation they are using. All the paper sought to do is see if doing full or half squats had a different effect. Spoiler, the test group that did full squats got stronger.

    A high bar squat is not the same as a low bar squat. The low bar back squat position allows for more back angle and more recruitment of the posterior chain.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28570490

    "Practitioners seeking to develop the posterior-chain hip musculature (i.e., gluteal, hamstring, and erector muscle groups) may seek to use the LBBS" (Low Bar Back Squat).

    This is the squat as taught in the Starting Strength book and videos.
    Last edited by bp7178; 12-24-19 at 18:11.

  4. #24
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    I edited my note above to specify setting your LOW back. I also updated the distance you should look ahead after thinking about it. In the low bar squat you look forward and down about 4 to 6 feet out. In the deadlift you look about 10 to 15 feet out. The trap bar "deadlift" is closer to a squat than a true deadlift, so you wouldn't want to be looking too far forward.

    The other thing to think about when doing this during testing would be to take the slack out of the bar and "push" the floor. I would imagine there will be many people hurting themselves by trying to suddenly jerk the bar off the floor. This in combination with NOT setting your low back would be a very quick and highly effective way to injure yourself.

    Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
    Last edited by n517rv; 01-03-20 at 00:07.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bp7178 View Post
    Your source never defines what squat variation they are using. All the paper sought to do is see if doing full or half squats had a different effect. Spoiler, the test group that did full squats got stronger.

    A high bar squat is not the same as a low bar squat. The low bar back squat position allows for more back angle and more recruitment of the posterior chain.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28570490

    "Practitioners seeking to develop the posterior-chain hip musculature (i.e., gluteal, hamstring, and erector muscle groups) may seek to use the LBBS" (Low Bar Back Squat).

    This is the squat as taught in the Starting Strength book and videos.
    Correct, Iím a natural low bar squatter, this has built up my Glutes and hamstrings. I never could get used to the front squat, but I do own a safety squat bar, this variation of the squat allows me to focus more on quads.

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