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Thread: M4A1 buffer spring?

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    M4A1 buffer spring?

    I gather that the H2 buffer is now standard in military carbines. Was there also an update to the buffer spring?

    Either way, whatís the current spring made of ó stainless?

    And if someone wanted a stainless spring with a little extra power, what options are available? If you want chrome-silicon, obviously Sprinco has it covered. Only thing Iíve found in stainless is Tubbís flat-wire. JP maybe? (Their website seems to have no info as to material or strength).

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    As far as I know the current M4A1s are delivered with the H2 buffer because of bolt bounce potentially being exacerbated by the heavier barrel. I don't believe there was a change in spring. Factory Colt springs are 17-7PH Stainless. I personally see no reason to stick with a stainless spring in lieu of other materials when proven alternatives are available (Sprinco).
    Quote Originally Posted by Jaykayyy
    And to the guys whining about spending more on training, and relying less on the hardware, you just sound like your [sic] trying to make yourself feel superior.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sry0fcr View Post
    I personally see no reason to stick with a stainless spring in lieu of other materials when proven alternatives are available (Sprinco).
    Because as Magpul found through extensive testing... the CS springs fail corrosion tests miserably. The military would never accept something so fragile for a combat weapon.

    In my opinion, there's nothing at all wrong with a mil spec spring, and I would never run CS springs in my guns.
    Last edited by markm; 01-23-20 at 18:25.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

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    I've only run chrome-silicon springs (recoil) in 1911s. Not impressed. categorize them as snake-oil.

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    Quote Originally Posted by markm View Post
    Because as Magpul found through extensive testing... the CS springs fail corrosion tests miserably. The military would never accept something so fragile for a combat weapon.

    In my opinion, there's nothing at all wrong with a mil spec spring, and I would never run CS springs in my guns.

    All of this.

    I use Colt or LMT normal springs and change every 3K rounds.

    NEVER had a spring problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by markm View Post
    The military would never accept something so fragile for a combat weapon.
    You obviously do not know the military. At least have no clue about reserve/national guard weapons my friend. Garbage is common.

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    Quote Originally Posted by markm View Post
    Because as Magpul found through extensive testing... the CS springs fail corrosion tests miserably. The military would never accept something so fragile for a combat weapon.

    In my opinion, there's nothing at all wrong with a mil spec spring, and I would never run CS springs in my guns.
    While markm might be right regarding a stainless spring being more corrosion resistant than a CS, that does't mean people should not use it. Sprinco springs have a special coating which makes them more corrosion resistant than a regular CS spring. Not always the case, but for people who shoot a lot longevity of a CS spring outweighs other factors. If you clean your gun every 1-2k rounds and apply lubricant to a spring you'll never have a problem.

    On the other hand if you live in a very humid climate or drag your gun through water (especially a salt water) you might need a stainless spring.

    Nothing wrong with stainless, but I and other people have seen them take set in as little as 4-5k rounds and cause issues.

    markm is a big proponent of BCM and BCM runs CS springs in their extractors which are subjected to a much harsher conditions vs a buffer spring. High pressure, temperature, burnt and unburnt powder, constant shock, humidity & debris contamination, and etc. CS does not seen to have a problem handing those conditions for thousands of rounds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by markm View Post
    Because as Magpul found through extensive testing... the CS springs fail corrosion tests miserably. The military would never accept something so fragile for a combat weapon.

    In my opinion, there's nothing at all wrong with a mil spec spring, and I would never run CS springs in my guns.
    Fair enough. Corrosion issues aren't much of a concern for me in the civilian context.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
    Quote Originally Posted by Jaykayyy
    And to the guys whining about spending more on training, and relying less on the hardware, you just sound like your [sic] trying to make yourself feel superior.

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    I use and like the sprinco blue if your rifle has the drive to run it well.

    Not concerned with corrosion since i lube and grease it. If it gets wet, Ill clean it.
    Also, as said, its covered with some kind of paint or plastic.

    Honsestly, Im not picky, iíve used bcm, colt, sprinco, and wolff. All performed fine with standard maintenance. Ive only had issue with 2 cheaper springs.
    Last edited by MegademiC; 01-23-20 at 20:17.

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    Thanks guys for the discussion; it was helpful.

    As I understand it, chrome-silicon springs really shine in applications with high temperatures and high cycle counts. So itís probably a good choice for extractor and ejector springs, since the bolt is the hottest area of the rifle with moving parts, and it cycles with every round fired. And mine at least is usually wet with oil, so Iím not too worried about rust there.

    Magazine springs by contrast donít get hot, donít see the same cycle count (once for every thirty rounds fired ó- and thatís if you only have a single mag). And I donít really like to oil them. So here I think stainless likely makes more sense.

    The buffer spring is an intermediate case: cycle count is high, temps are low, and oiling is reasonable. I was kinda surprised to hear that the service life of the milspec stainless spring is apparently only a few 1000 rounds.

    I do like the way the Sprinco blue + H2 feels (on a carbine-gassed 14Ē barrel). And I like the idea that thereís a little extra oomph available to strip the first ornery rounds off a full mag. I think maybe Iíll try one of the Tubb flat-wires and compare. (The new stainless version; they used to be chrome-silicon I believe.)

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