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Thread: What 1911's have a slide that is easy to pull back?

  1. #11
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    If you do the overhand push method make sure the person isn't muzzling their own elbow. I've seen people do that.

  2. #12
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    Again, 9mm. Do not buy a Springfield, they are crazy tight. Colts are loose. And high end guns like Nighthawk..are smooth and easier to rack.

    PB
    "Air Force / Policeman / Fireman / Man of God / Friend of mine / R.I.P. Steve Lamy"

  3. #13
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    Unless your dead set on a 9mm 1911 (they are great!) You might take a look at the S&W M&P 9mm EZ. Granted it's not a 1911 but capacity is about the same & your not going to find an easier handgun to rack the slide on.

  4. #14
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    Is a .38 Super easy to rack like a 9x19?

  5. #15
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    I can't tell the difference between the two.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron3 View Post
    Is a .38 Super easy to rack like a 9x19?
    It all depends on the rating of the recoil and mainsprings.
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by glocktogo View Post
    It all depends on the rating of the recoil and mainsprings.
    Yea. I read that .38's often have about a 16 lb and 9mm's about a 12. Or so. (Recoil)

    I guess .45's run about a 16-18?

    Talking about 5 inch barrels.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron3 View Post
    Yea. I read that .38's often have about a 16 lb and 9mm's about a 12. Or so. (Recoil)

    I guess .45's run about a 16-18?

    Talking about 5 inch barrels.
    Correct. I think 16# is pretty standard for 5" .45's and some will run stiffer if they're using hot ammo. On my competition 9mm I run 12# for 147 subs. I've gone as light as 10# but don't like the recoil impulse. IIRC, Matt Mink was running an 11# spring in the same DW PM-9 when he was shooting for CZ-DW. I wasn't sure on the std. .38 Super recoil spring weight, but figured it was heavier than 9mm.

    Of course as stated, firing pin stop profiles and mainspring weights (19# is considered "lightweight" and 23# is std.) have a more direct impact than recoil spring weight. The difference is felt on opposite ends of the slide travel though.

    A 5" 9mm set up with a 12# recoil, 19# mainspring and flat bottomed or lightly radiused firing pin stop will be hard to rack right at the very beginning and as soon as you overcome the resistance of the flat bottomed fps, it will pull all the way back easily. That's why the gun runs so flat, because you've significantly increased the dwell time of the slide cycle. That happens when the hammer is down on an empty chamber or misfire, as well as during the firing cycle. With the hammer back you can run a 12# sprung slide back and forth with ease.

    On the opposite end, a 5" 1911 with a 16-18# recoil spring, 23# mainspring and stock radius fps will be easier to cycle at the very beginning, but get much stiffer near the end. You're a lot more likely to short stroke that setup if you don't apply sufficient force to racking the slide. Obviously you can play with the numbers but for a carry/defense gun it's best to not get too crazy. When I ran a 5" .45 in competition, I ran a 16# stock recoil, 19# main and EGW flat bottom fps. I used a lot of Ti parts in the fire control group to gain back the lost lock time dropping from 23# to 19# on the mainspring and the flat bottom fps helped keep the gun flatter in recoil.

    I was also carrying a S&W 1911PD off the range to maintain training commonality, but ran fully stock parts and springs, coupled with a GI plug instead of a full length guide rod. In the event I needed to rack it one handed in an emergency, I didn't want to have to overcome a flat bottom FPS or extra heavy recoil spring.
    Last edited by glocktogo; 02-27-20 at 14:05.
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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arik View Post
    Cock the hammer. If you want even easier pull the slide back while pushing the grip forward
    That'll work.

  10. #20
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    I think I agree with everything here. I guess the issue is, you want to have it with a mag in it but the chamber unloaded? Having it cocked with the safety on makes you nervous-- I don't hold that against anyone. So if this is the case, DO have it cocked and locked, but on an empty chamber. Then when it's needed you don't have to cock the hammer, which can be awkward-- just take off the safety and cycle the slide.

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