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Thread: Covid 19: adjuvant approaches etc,

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Bell View Post
    What causes these Vitamin D deficiencies? Just lack of sun? Skin tone?
    All the above. We humans were outside and working under the sun all day up until quite recently in our history. One hypothesis as to why white people exist is as they went into colder climates with less sun, skin got lighter to allow more D production. For all intel on that, D, etc best article on the net:

    https://brinkzone.com/vitamin-d-what...to-achieve-it/
    - Will

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    www.BrinkZone.com


    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillBrink View Post
    All the above. We humans were outside and working under the sun all day up until quite recently in our history. One hypothesis as to why white people exist is as they went into colder climates with less sun, skin got lighter to allow more D production. For all intel on that, D, etc best article on the net:

    https://brinkzone.com/vitamin-d-what...to-achieve-it/
    Did white people eat less fish than Inuit and other tribes located in colder climates?

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by FriendlyStranger View Post
    Did white people eat less fish than Inuit and other tribes located in colder climates?
    Depended on where they lived but sunshine required to activate D. Note also Inuit at high risk of D deficiencies:

    Vitamin D deficiency and disease risk among aboriginal Arctic populations - Aug 2011

    Sangita Sharma 1, gita.sharma@ualberta.ca; Alison B Barr 2; Helen M Macdonald 3, Tony Sheehy 4, Rachel Novotny 5, Andre Corriveau 6
    1 Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    2 Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, North Carolina, USA
    3 Bone and Musculoskeletal Research Programme, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, Scotland
    4 School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Republic of Ireland
    5 Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA
    6 Alberta Health and Wellness, Government of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Nutrition Reviews, Volume 69, Issue 8, pages 468–478, August 2011

    Aboriginal populations living above the Arctic Circle are at particularly high risk of vitamin D deficiency due to

    limited ultraviolet B exposure (related to geographic latitude) and
    inadequate dietary intake (recently related to decreased traditional food consumption).

    Major changes in diet and lifestyle over the past 50 years in these populations have coincided with increased prevalence rates of

    rickets,
    cancer,
    diabetes, and
    obesity,

    each of which may be associated with vitamin D inadequacy.
    This review examines the risk factors for vitamin D inadequacy, the associations between vitamin D and disease risk at high geographic latitudes, and the recommendations for improving vitamin D status particularly among aboriginal Arctic populations. Traditional foods, such as fatty fish and marine mammals, are rich sources of vitamin D and should continue to be promoted to improve dietary vitamin D intake. Supplementation protocols may also be necessary to ensure adequate vitamin D status in the Arctic.
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com


    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillBrink View Post
    Depended on where they lived but sunshine required to activate D. Note also Inuit at high risk of D deficiencies:

    Vitamin D deficiency and disease risk among aboriginal Arctic populations - Aug 2011

    Sangita Sharma 1, gita.sharma@ualberta.ca; Alison B Barr 2; Helen M Macdonald 3, Tony Sheehy 4, Rachel Novotny 5, Andre Corriveau 6
    1 Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    2 Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, North Carolina, USA
    3 Bone and Musculoskeletal Research Programme, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, Scotland
    4 School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Republic of Ireland
    5 Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA
    6 Alberta Health and Wellness, Government of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Nutrition Reviews, Volume 69, Issue 8, pages 468–478, August 2011

    Aboriginal populations living above the Arctic Circle are at particularly high risk of vitamin D deficiency due to

    limited ultraviolet B exposure (related to geographic latitude) and
    inadequate dietary intake (recently related to decreased traditional food consumption).

    Major changes in diet and lifestyle over the past 50 years in these populations have coincided with increased prevalence rates of

    rickets,
    cancer,
    diabetes, and
    obesity,

    each of which may be associated with vitamin D inadequacy.
    This review examines the risk factors for vitamin D inadequacy, the associations between vitamin D and disease risk at high geographic latitudes, and the recommendations for improving vitamin D status particularly among aboriginal Arctic populations. Traditional foods, such as fatty fish and marine mammals, are rich sources of vitamin D and should continue to be promoted to improve dietary vitamin D intake. Supplementation protocols may also be necessary to ensure adequate vitamin D status in the Arctic.
    That explains one tribe but what about the others located a bit further south in North America?

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by FriendlyStranger View Post
    That explains one tribe but what about the others located a bit further south in North America?
    Again, will depend on various factors, location, time of year, diet, etc. Genetic variations likely exist too.
    - Will

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    www.BrinkZone.com


    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillBrink View Post
    Again, will depend on various factors, location, time of year, diet, etc. Genetic variations likely exist too.
    That makes sense.

  7. #57
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    Another stupid question.

    Why is covid worse/more prevalent in the winter? My understanding is that the combination of hot weather and stronger UV kills more of the virus. I understand that may be an oversimplified view. If that's the case then why is southern Cali such a hot zone?

    Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arik View Post
    Another stupid question.

    Why is covid worse/more prevalent in the winter? My understanding is that the combination of hot weather and stronger UV kills more of the virus. I understand that may be an oversimplified view. If that's the case then why is southern Cali such a hot zone?

    Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk
    As Covid has not been around long, has it really been established it's worse/more prevalent in the winter? I have not actually looked myself. But, if it applies to covid as it does the flu, some reasons may be:

    1) During the winter, people spend more time indoors with the windows sealed, so they are more likely to breathe the same air as someone who has the flu and thus contract the virus (3).

    2) Days are shorter during the winter, and lack of sunlight leads to low levels of vitamin D and melatonin, both of which require sunlight for their generation. This compromises our immune systems, which in turn decreases ability to fight the virus (3).

    3) The influenza virus may survive better in colder, drier climates, and therefore be able to infect more people (3).

    Source:

    http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/20...kes-in-winter/
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com


    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillBrink View Post
    As Covid has not been around long, has it really been established it's worse/more prevalent in the winter? I have not actually looked myself. But, if it applies to covid as it does the flu, some reasons may be:

    1) During the winter, people spend more time indoors with the windows sealed, so they are more likely to breathe the same air as someone who has the flu and thus contract the virus (3).

    2) Days are shorter during the winter, and lack of sunlight leads to low levels of vitamin D and melatonin, both of which require sunlight for their generation. This compromises our immune systems, which in turn decreases ability to fight the virus (3).

    3) The influenza virus may survive better in colder, drier climates, and therefore be able to infect more people (3).

    Source:

    http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/20...kes-in-winter/
    It seems like there are more infections and deaths this fall/winter then there was during summer. After everything was open.

    1) yes maybe however, summer time people just exchange the heater for the AC. Windows are still closed.

    2) people still don't spend that much time outside. Going to the beach on Saturday or a weekend vacation doesn't count to the overall increase in vD. Exception to those who work outdoors. Otherwise you're in an office, a store or home. All indoors, all AC.

    3) Then why is southern Cali a hot zone. Also.... If people open windows and spend time outside more thus getting more vD then why is southern Cali a hot zone?

    Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arik View Post
    It seems like there are more infections and deaths this fall/winter then there was during summer. After everything was open.

    1) yes maybe however, summer time people just exchange the heater for the AC. Windows are still closed.

    2) people still don't spend that much time outside. Going to the beach on Saturday or a weekend vacation doesn't count to the overall increase in vD. Exception to those who work outdoors. Otherwise you're in an office, a store or home. All indoors, all AC.

    3) Then why is southern Cali a hot zone. Also.... If people open windows and spend time outside more thus getting more vD then why is southern Cali a hot zone?

    Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk
    I's expect it's multifactorial but specific the bolded, it's not easy to get opitmal D levels via sun as some think. Per article linked above on my site:

    "Even though sun exposure theoretically is an effective vitamin D source, it cannot safely be relied on. A recent study showed that vitamin D supplementation is actually more effective than advised sunlight exposure for treating vitamin D deficiency [64]. The inferiority of sunlight exposure to improve and keep optimal vitamin D status is supported by findings of prevalent vitamin D insufficiency even in sunny Florida [65]. This was also underlined in a study of tanned prototypic “surfer dudes” (mean age 24 years) who overall reported an average of 22.4 hours per week of unprotected sun exposure [66]. Despite this abundant sunshine exposure, the mean blood vitamin D level was only 31 ng/mL (79 nmol/L), and 51% had a level below the recommended ideal 30 ng/mL (75 nmol/L) cutoff for sufficiency [66]."

    Citations found:

    https://brinkzone.com/vitamin-d-what...to-achieve-it/
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com


    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

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