Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31

Thread: It Was May, 1984...And Something Wonderful Happened...

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    The South
    Posts
    3,885
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by SteyrAUG View Post
    There were no pre68 examples so all factory MP5s were "pre 86 dealer samples" until the Hughes / Rodino ban and after that they were post 86 dealer samples which require a demo letter and must sell, surrender or destroy if you retire your license. If you are a FFL/SOT you don't need a "permission letter" to buy pre 86 samples and you can retain them if you retire your license, however they remain restricted and can only be transferred to a current FFL / SOT. They cannot be passed on via Form 5 to a lawful heir and cannot be transferred to anyone who is not a FFL / SOT.

    There are rumored to be a group of pre-68 mp5s that went to an agency in TX. But said agency will not sell/trade them. These guns are reported to have exceptionally high round counts.
    SLG Defense 07/02 FFL/SOT

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    The South
    Posts
    3,885
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Shannon View Post
    I had mixed feelings for the FNC. I think the upper receiver was the best implementation of a twin lug long stroke gas system Iíve seen (Garland -> AK -> FNC lineage). The lower was unfortunately lacking. It had no bevel for the magazine, no fence around the magazine release, and no last round bolt hold open.
    Being an engineer I wanted it to be perfect.

    I have a SCAR 16 that makes up for those lower receiver shortcomings, but I still prefer the two lug long stroke upper of the FNC.

    I would like to have a para style stock from my old FNC carbine on the SCAR 16 also. It was the best folding stock Iíve ever had. Rigid when extended and easy to use.

    I love my FNC. Itís a fullauto conversion with S&H sear. The FNC is a nice product improved AK. But I totally agree re lacking in areas. Itís odd that FN dropped the bolt catch on the FNC given that itís predecessor the CAL has a bolt catch. The Swedes added it to the AK5 series. Eventually my FNC is getting a full Swedish AK5C makeover, and will have a bolt catch added.
    SLG Defense 07/02 FFL/SOT

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    24,671
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by JoshNC View Post
    There are rumored to be a group of pre-68 mp5s that went to an agency in TX. But said agency will not sell/trade them. These guns are reported to have exceptionally high round counts.
    I'm not buying it. I don't think any MP5s were imported prior to the 68 ban. I've seen transferable, factory G3s but even those are few and far between and HK started importing the semi's in 62. But the world was so flooded with WWII vintage subguns, nobody was going to pay market price for a 9mm anything, even pre68 Uzi's are damn rare and Uzi's were top of the line grail guns of mythical properties at the time.

    PD armories were still full of Thompsons and Grease Guns in 1968. They were also flooded with surplus and cheap M2's (both the SMG and carbine). If they were gonna pay full ticket for something new, it would have been a M-16. Also Reed Knight doesn't have one and if they actually existed, Reed Knight would have one, or at least Dan Shea and neither does. I know HKPro likes to discuss the possibility that some might have come in between 1966 and 1968 but it's like discussing how we might have been visited by aliens and they could have built the pyramids.

    Until I see the evidence, all the evidence I've seen suggests otherwise.
    It's hard to be a ACLU hating, philosophically Libertarian, socially liberal, fiscally conservative, scientifically grounded, agnostic, porn admiring gun owner who believes in self determination.

    Chuck, we miss ya man.

    كافر

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    24,671
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by JoshNC View Post
    I love my FNC. It’s a fullauto conversion with S&H sear. The FNC is a nice product improved AK. But I totally agree re lacking in areas. It’s odd that FN dropped the bolt catch on the FNC given that it’s predecessor the CAL has a bolt catch. The Swedes added it to the AK5 series. Eventually my FNC is getting a full Swedish AK5C makeover, and will have a bolt catch added.

    Sweden simply needs to get on the ball and ship us some semi AK5s. If we can get SIGs, anything is possible. I never thought I'd see the day when we'd get SIGs...again.
    It's hard to be a ACLU hating, philosophically Libertarian, socially liberal, fiscally conservative, scientifically grounded, agnostic, porn admiring gun owner who believes in self determination.

    Chuck, we miss ya man.

    كافر

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    2,145
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by SteyrAUG View Post
    I've probably watched "6 Days" a dozen times. Nice to see they still haven't fixed those windows.
    I think the movie "6 Days" may have been my tipping point in deciding to buy this gun. I had been interested in an MP5/HK94 for a while. I wound up buying an HK94 and SBRing it in 2016. I had a paddle mag release fitted to it along with the 3-lug muzzle device. I really like the gun, as does everyone who shoots it.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    24,671
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed L. View Post
    I think the movie "6 Days" may have been my tipping point in deciding to buy this gun. I had been interested in an MP5/HK94 for a while. I wound up buying an HK94 and SBRing it in 2016. I had a paddle mag release fitted to it along with the 3-lug muzzle device. I really like the gun, as does everyone who shoots it.
    I saw Die Hard (1988), which ironically was the greatest advertisement for the MP5 than anything HK had ever produced - even though there wasn't a genuine HK MP5 in the entire film (all conversions) and that was it. In 1990 I moved back to Florida and a small part of the reason was I knew I couldn't lawfully own any machine gun in the state of Iowa at the time and no matter what, there was going to be a MP5 in my life...and eventually every other firearm depicted in the film.

    Only the film Heat would have a greater impact on my bank balance. I sometimes think I should get together with my friends and do a frame by frame "tribute film" to Die Hard. I think I've lost enough hair for the Bruce Willis role.
    It's hard to be a ACLU hating, philosophically Libertarian, socially liberal, fiscally conservative, scientifically grounded, agnostic, porn admiring gun owner who believes in self determination.

    Chuck, we miss ya man.

    كافر

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,219
    Feedback Score
    12 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by SteyrAUG View Post
    In 1990 I moved back to Florida and a small part of the reason was I knew I couldn't lawfully own any machine gun in the state of Iowa at the time and no matter what, there was going to be a MP5 in my life...and eventually every other firearm depicted in the film.
    That changed, right? Iowa is now Class III? Looking for alternatives to my shithole state, but, damn, Iowa income taxes and vehicle registrations are high.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    24,671
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by sundance435 View Post
    That changed, right? Iowa is now Class III? Looking for alternatives to my shithole state, but, damn, Iowa income taxes and vehicle registrations are high.
    Sorta. They did everything EXCEPT machine guns. So suppressors, SBRs, SBSs and AOWs are good to go but you have to be a FFL / SOT to have machine guns. I'm hoping they will eventually become a FULL NFA state but I might have to be a SOT for the rest of my life.

    Vehicle registration is slightly higher than it was in FL, but that was dramatically offset by how much more affordable car insurance is. Mine was half of what I was paying in FL and I even added an extra vehicle. Taken together cars are 30% cheaper in Iowa give or take.

    State taxes are high and aggressive, but I consider it the cost of living in a state with mostly normal people. Cost of living probably completely offsets income tax demands.
    It's hard to be a ACLU hating, philosophically Libertarian, socially liberal, fiscally conservative, scientifically grounded, agnostic, porn admiring gun owner who believes in self determination.

    Chuck, we miss ya man.

    كافر

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    CONUS
    Posts
    3,963
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by SteyrAUG View Post
    I've probably watched "6 Days" a dozen times. Nice to see they still haven't fixed those windows.
    How many times have you watched 'Who Dares Wins' (released as 'The Final Option' in the US?). When I first saw that movie as a teenager hungry for good gun movies, I thought it was awesome. It was also the first time I had seen SAS in counter-terror gear featured in a movie.

    For those who haven't seen it, it's a 1982 movie which starred Lewis Collins (who was one of my favourite actors from the late 70's/early 80's who coincidentally also played an ex-SAS guy in the TV show 'The Professionals').

    Here's a clip of the final raid: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUDe6saJFmM
    While it's definitely 'Hollywood' for dramatic effect, it's still one of the coolest sequences I've seen in a 'gun film', especially one from the early 80's. Gotta love black-clad guys rappelling off helicopters onto a roof, flash-bangs and long bursts from MP5s!

    'Who Dares Wins' had lots of MP5s with the straight mags, and was one of the films that made me fascinated with the MP5.

    From the wikipedia link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Dares_Wins_(film)

    "Filming began in September 1981. The film had a number of advisers who had worked in the SAS which led to some concerns from the Ministry of Defence that the film could breach the Official Secrets Act.[1] However Lloyd says the ministry eventually gave its "tacit approval" to the film after two small changes to the story were made; "after that they opened the door quite widely and even provided three military helicopters", the producer said.[7]

    According to the DVD commentary, the film was made with the help of the 22 SAS Regiment at Hereford, although their commanding officer Peter de la BilliŤre had initially refused to help in a pre-production meeting with Euan Lloyd. Director Ian Sharp, who was hired due to Lloyd's liking of his direction in the TV series The Professionals, was invited to SAS headquarters at Stirling Lines where he met some of the troops who assaulted the Iranian embassy. With the co-operation of the SAS achieved, production moved ahead swiftly.

    During one of his visits to Stirling Lines, Sharp had met a Fijian trooper who had a mishap during the Iranian embassy assault. The trooper told how he got caught up in his descent and his uniform caught fire due to the explosives used for their forced entry. Inspired by this, Sharp had a similar scene inserted.

    The first scenes were shot in Portobello Road market in January 1982. The concert, speech and subsequent fight were staged at the Union Chapel in Islington, London. Skellen's house and the hostage taking was shot in Kynance Mews in South Kensington.[12]

    When it came time to shoot the SAS assault on the US embassy, the crew had prepared the helicopters and stuntmen but the SAS offered to do the scene instead. Sharp accepted as he thought the look they gave could not be replicated by the crew. "

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    24,671
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by militarymoron View Post
    How many times have you watched 'Who Dares Wins' (released as 'The Final Option' in the US?). When I first saw that movie as a teenager hungry for good gun movies, I thought it was awesome. It was also the first time I had seen SAS in counter-terror gear featured in a movie.

    For those who haven't seen it, it's a 1982 movie which starred Lewis Collins (who was one of my favourite actors from the late 70's/early 80's who coincidentally also played an ex-SAS guy in the TV show 'The Professionals').

    Here's a clip of the final raid: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUDe6saJFmM
    While it's definitely 'Hollywood' for dramatic effect, it's still one of the coolest sequences I've seen in a 'gun film', especially one from the early 80's. Gotta love black-clad guys rappelling off helicopters onto a roof, flash-bangs and long bursts from MP5s!

    'Who Dares Wins' had lots of MP5s with the straight mags, and was one of the films that made me fascinated with the MP5.

    From the wikipedia link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Dares_Wins_(film)

    "Filming began in September 1981. The film had a number of advisers who had worked in the SAS which led to some concerns from the Ministry of Defence that the film could breach the Official Secrets Act.[1] However Lloyd says the ministry eventually gave its "tacit approval" to the film after two small changes to the story were made; "after that they opened the door quite widely and even provided three military helicopters", the producer said.[7]

    According to the DVD commentary, the film was made with the help of the 22 SAS Regiment at Hereford, although their commanding officer Peter de la BilliŤre had initially refused to help in a pre-production meeting with Euan Lloyd. Director Ian Sharp, who was hired due to Lloyd's liking of his direction in the TV series The Professionals, was invited to SAS headquarters at Stirling Lines where he met some of the troops who assaulted the Iranian embassy. With the co-operation of the SAS achieved, production moved ahead swiftly.

    During one of his visits to Stirling Lines, Sharp had met a Fijian trooper who had a mishap during the Iranian embassy assault. The trooper told how he got caught up in his descent and his uniform caught fire due to the explosives used for their forced entry. Inspired by this, Sharp had a similar scene inserted.

    The first scenes were shot in Portobello Road market in January 1982. The concert, speech and subsequent fight were staged at the Union Chapel in Islington, London. Skellen's house and the hostage taking was shot in Kynance Mews in South Kensington.[12]

    When it came time to shoot the SAS assault on the US embassy, the crew had prepared the helicopters and stuntmen but the SAS offered to do the scene instead. Sharp accepted as he thought the look they gave could not be replicated by the crew. "
    Probably a half dozen times. It can be a hard movie to find in the US. Read about it in SOF and eventually found a VHS copy sometime in the late 80s. When WinMX was still a thing I was able to get myself a copy and make a DVD burn. Looks like there has still never been a Region 1 DVD release.
    It's hard to be a ACLU hating, philosophically Libertarian, socially liberal, fiscally conservative, scientifically grounded, agnostic, porn admiring gun owner who believes in self determination.

    Chuck, we miss ya man.

    كافر

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •