Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 47

Thread: Theoretical advantage of A5 buffer system?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    179
    Feedback Score
    0

    Theoretical advantage of A5 buffer system?

    What is the theoretical advantage of the A5 buffer system over a carbine buffer system with a flat-wire spring?

    Use of flat-wire allows for a longer spring with a lower spring constant which should be able to match the A5 force curve unless the latter used an even longer flat-wire spring.

    The A5 buffer itself is longer, uses four weights instead of three, and includes a bias spring. Perhaps having more pieces provides an improved dead-blow effect even when the mass is similar, e.g. H2 and A5H1. I suppose the bias spring makes the system more consistent, e.g. between muzzle up and down, but does it do more? Does the longer body itself contribute to smoother cycling, such as by being less prone to pitch or yaw?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    26,886
    Feedback Score
    14 (100%)
    The flat wire spring variable throws me for a loop. I've no idea what that is/does.

    The A5 notion is that you get the Rifle buffer weight/spring with it's longer compression position in an RE almost as short as the carbine.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    179
    Feedback Score
    0
    A flat wire spring can provide the "longer compression position" (lower spring constant, flatter force curve) of a standard rifle spring in less space, i.e. a carbine extension. I think there's more to the A5 than that however. If it were merely mass and spring constant it should be possible to duplicate that (the common A5 setup) with an H3 and the right strength of flat-wire spring.
    Last edited by Disciple; 08-01-20 at 12:03.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    2,972
    Feedback Score
    21 (100%)
    You've got the right idea.

    There are however at least two mega threads covering the A5 system here and a quick search should reveal a goldmine of information on it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Disciple View Post
    The A5 buffer itself is longer, uses four weights instead of three, and includes a bias spring. Perhaps having more pieces provides an improved dead-blow effect even when the mass is similar, e.g. H2 and A5H1. I suppose the bias spring makes the system more consistent, e.g. between muzzle up and down, but does it do more? Does the longer body itself contribute to smoother cycling, such as by being less prone to pitch or yaw?
    Black River Tactical
    BRT OPTIMUM Barrels - 16" MPR, 14.5" MPC, 12.5" MRC, 11.5" CQB, 9" PDW
    BRT EZTUNE Preset Gas Tubes - CAR and MID
    BRT Covert Comps 7.62, 5.56, 6X, 9mm
    BRT MarkBlue Gas Tubes - BRT EXT, EXC and PDW Lengths
    BRT MicroPin Gas Blocks - .750" & .625"
    BRT MicroTUNE Adjustable Gas Blocks
    BRT CustomTUNE Gas Ports

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    69
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    I run a5h2 and tubbs flatwire springs in my 10.3,y 12.5 and my 16. I really like the setup. It's also one of those things that you need to try for yourself.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    26,886
    Feedback Score
    14 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Disciple View Post
    A flat wire spring can provide the "longer compression position" (lower spring constant, flatter force curve) of a standard rifle spring in less space, i.e. a carbine extension. I think there's more to the A5 than that however. If it were merely mass and spring constant it should be possible to duplicate that (the common A5 setup) with an H3 and the right strength of flat-wire spring.
    Rsilvers best duplicated the A5 or Rifle system with the carbine standard spring and H2 buffer. I forget his measurements, but the flat spring wasn't part of his testing. I forget exactly how close it matched the A5/rifle.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    179
    Feedback Score
    0
    Clint, I shall read more.

    corey4, do you use the standard length Tubb spring?

    markm, is that on this forum?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    26,886
    Feedback Score
    14 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Disciple View Post
    markm, is that on this forum?
    Yes, sir. It's a few years back. "rsilvers" was the guy (formerly of Advanced Armament)
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    179
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thanks, I'll search for it.

    I found this from Clint, supporting my conjecture.

    Quote Originally Posted by Clint View Post
    One big advantage of the A5 is the 4 weights it contains vs the 3 in the carbine. For reference, the rifle buffer contains 5+ weights and disks.

    The internal moving weights are what make a buffer a BUFFER instead of just a spring guide and bump stop.

    A stainless steel body is heavier than aluminum, but it can't have more moving weights inside than 3 tungsten, and therefore can't be a better buffer.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    1,574
    Feedback Score
    37 (100%)
    markm, did rsilvers throw the H6 into the mix? I know itís an odd option, but it was the choice of the Army.

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •