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Thread: University of Texas Dell Medical Center Study on Tourniquet use by Civilians

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    University of Texas Dell Medical Center Study on Tourniquet use by Civilians

    https://www.trauma-news.com/2018/04/...-in-mortality/


    Not NEW information but to the extent that you still have people who question the use of tourniquets, I can't think of a more authoritative source nor relevant study.
    The truth can only offend those who live a lie.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Esq. View Post
    https://www.trauma-news.com/2018/04/...-in-mortality/


    Not NEW information but to the extent that you still have people who question the use of tourniquets, I can't think of a more authoritative source nor relevant study.
    Conventional trauma management is still behind the times, by about 5 years. The gold standard courses--ATLS for physicians, TNCC for nurses, and PHTLS for everyone else--still cling to the old ways. I am trying to change this in my institution, but it's largely jousting at windmills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckman View Post
    Conventional trauma management is still behind the times, by about 5 years. The gold standard courses--ATLS for physicians, TNCC for nurses, and PHTLS for everyone else--still cling to the old ways. I am trying to change this in my institution, but it's largely jousting at windmills.
    In what aspects it is behind times? just interested.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EvanDuffy View Post
    In what aspects it is behind times? just interested.
    It is still largely driven by ABCDE instead of MARCH, still 2 large-bore IVs, it treats permissive hypotension as something to consider rather than the current doctrine. It's the nature of institutional medicine plus textbooks/curricula that hasn't caught up to research and current practice. It will in the next iteration, but it takes forever.

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    It seems some still cling to the belief that once you put a tourniquet on, the patient will loose the limb.

    I still thought that until I got some training (Dark Angel) and got a new, updated perspective.

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    Any change in any industry is always time-consuming.


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    The research papers are sometimes very important. You can always refer to https://edubirdie.com/research-paper-help for advice. If you are a student writing research, this will be helpful to you.
    Last edited by SpencerDixon; 08-21-20 at 11:33.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckman View Post
    Conventional trauma management is still behind the times, by about 5 years. The gold standard courses--ATLS for physicians, TNCC for nurses, and PHTLS for everyone else--still cling to the old ways. I am trying to change this in my institution, but it's largely jousting at windmills.
    Here's what's funny to me about that- in Major surgeries, physicians regularly clamp off blood flow etc...and think nothing of it....How is a tourniquet any different?
    The truth can only offend those who live a lie.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Esq. View Post
    Here's what's funny to me about that- in Major surgeries, physicians regularly clamp off blood flow etc...and think nothing of it....How is a tourniquet any different?
    It's really not; in fact, it (TQ) is actually safer. It's a whole paradigm shift in a way of thinking that is over 75 years old. As the current generation of providers age and move out, and the curriculum catches up, it will be good.

    How's this to blow your mind: in my institution, only physicians--not nurses, not paramedics who work in the ED, not mid-level providers--can put on a tourniquet.

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    Thanks for sharing this research! I am a newbie about the gun. My father wants to buy it, but I am really worried about it.

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    Last edited by DeannaUnger; 08-30-20 at 12:31.

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    Nice. I just started putting together a small IFAK, and this makes me feel slightly less silly in doing so. I've narrowed it down to tourniquet, combat gauze, chest seals, trauma shears, nasopharyngeal, and pneumothorax. If there's room left, I'll add an Israeli bandage and maybe a space blanket.

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