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Thread: Novice Build .308 Sub 3 MOA

  1. #11
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    Define novice.

    If you haven't assembled an AR15 from scratch, I wouldn't cut your teeth on an AR10.

  2. #12
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    What is your budget for the complete weapon to include scope, scope mount, bi-pod, etc?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dewshe View Post
    Define novice.

    If you haven't assembled an AR15 from scratch, I wouldn't cut your teeth on an AR10.
    Do you mean from a technical perspective, or from a parts compatibility one?

  4. #14
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    It is not any more difficult to assemble an AR.308 than it is to slap together an AR15. As long as you stick to one of the two patterns (DPMS or Armalite), then you will be good to go. DPMS is by far the more popular pattern.

  5. #15
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    Certain components of DPMS and Armalite patterns can be mixed.
    For example as long as the barrel and BCG are both DPMS pattern they can be used in an Armalite pattern AR-10 receiver set. That I have confirmed personally. As for vice versa (Armalite pattern barrel and BCG inside DPMS pattern receiver set) that I cannot confirm.

    Keep in mind that there are a number of newer patterns that are neither Armalite nor DPMS, such as S&W M&P10, DPMS G2 pattern, Savage MSR-10, POF's new small frame .308 AR pattern, and probably several others that I can't remember right now.

  6. #16
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    I've put together both from scratch, and I will say that the AR10 required more thought when putting together, particularly with regard to the interaction of the barrel length, buffer tube, buffer, gas length, gas block, and spring selection.

    I feel the AR10 demands a more intimate knowledge of how the components of the system work together, and has less room for error when selecting those components for a purpose built rifle.

    Hard to screw up a traditional AR15.
    Last edited by dewshe; 11-26-20 at 11:48.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dewshe View Post
    I've put together both from scratch, and I will say that the AR10 required more thought when putting together, particularly with regard to the interaction of the barrel length, buffer tube, buffer, gas length, gas block, and spring selection.

    I feel the AR10 demands a more intimate knowledge of how the components of the system work together, and has less room for error when selecting those components for a purpose built rifle.

    Hard to screw up a traditional AR15.
    True, but it is amazing to watch how FUBAR a lot of AR15 builds (and even some factory guns) are.

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