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Thread: Quikclot: Civilian vs Combat Gauze?

  1. #1
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    Quikclot: Civilian vs Combat Gauze?

    What is the difference between the “civilian” versions of Quikclot to the military and law enforcement versions aside from the xray strip and packaging? Is the civilian versions just as effective as the others?

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    I think those are the only differences. I’ve used both on the ambulance with equal effectiveness from my perspective.


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    That’s how I understand it as well.
    AQ planned for years and sent their A team to carry out the attacks, and on Flight 93 they were thwarted by a pick-up team made up of United Frequent Fliers. Many people look at 9/11 and wonder how we can stop an enemy like that. I look at FL93 and wonder, "How can we lose?". -- FromMyColdDeadHand

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    Sounds good, thanks for the responses.

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    sorry to bust in on this, do you guys have a link on where I can find this? is it called quick clot? Thanks in advance.

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    https://www.narescue.com/all-product..._store=default

    Remember:

    Tourniquets are for extremities

    Quikclot is to plug holes

    Dressings cover wounds and holes

    Bandaids have a place for minor stuff and are often forgotten these days.

    Go online, do a search for “Stop the Bleed” training. And after that take a first aid or wilderness first aid class from Red Cross, American Heart Assn or ASHI.

    Toys don’t mean shit without training. That especially applies to medical stuff.


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    Quote Originally Posted by jsf343 View Post
    sagame66
    sorry to bust in on this, do you guys have a link on where I can find this? is it called quick clot? Thanks in advance.
    and what is it used for

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sharkins View Post
    and what is it used for
    https://quikclot.com/

    I had a long talk with one of the clinical consultants for Z-medica. She said the current packages are the same gauze, just different colors of plastic on the outside. The official party line is that you should not use a package once it is past its expiration date, but she said that in the product, you have gauze, kaolin clay (as she put it, "good old georgia mud"), and a binder to make the clay stick to the gauze. She stated that she has never seen any separation of the clay from the gauze, has never seen or heard of an expired product failing to perform, and the expiration date only guarantees sterility. She never discards any old packages for her own use.

    Since any incision or puncture wound outside of an OR is not going to be sterile anyway and isn't even going to be aseptic, sterility is not important. That is what thorough cleansing and/or antibiotics are for. She unofficially endorsed my practice of partially using a roll for smaller wounds, even small lacerations, sticking the roll back in the package, and sticking the package in a ziplock for the next time. She says she does the same thing as does everyone she knows.

    I carry Combat Gauze and mini rolls of duct tape in place of bandaids for the most part in my IFAK, as you can use a whole roll of Combat Gauze to treat a femoral artery bleed or trim a small piece of Combat Gauze off and use duct tape to create a small "bandaid" of whatever size you need from 1/4"- 6+" for superficial lacerations, but you can't scale a bandaid of any size up to treat a serious bleeder. Thus Combat Gauze and duct tape serve two purposes whereas bandaids serve only one.

    Read the literature about how Combat Gauze outperforms other brands in not causing clots in pulmonary vessels of animals sacrificed in comparison testing. I believe it was done in Belgium. This brings you to the abstract. You can link to the DOI yourself. I'm not providing that link as it brings you directly to the download page, and I don't figure any of you know me well enough to trust me THAT much. LOL https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27487507/

    Also, there have been some saves of OB/GYN patients using Combat Gauze who otherwise would likely have perished due to inability to stop bleeding when everything went wrong, mass transfusion protocols were introduced, nothing else worked, and they used Quik Clot as a Hail Mary in some hospitals here CONUS. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5554919/

    If you have a .gov or .mil email, you can get a pretty good discount on both the CAT Tourniquet and Quik Clot from North American Rescue. That is the route I go as I get the discount.
    Last edited by CrashAxe; 12-14-20 at 02:10. Reason: I can't type worth a crap. Time to go to bed.

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    One more thing...

    One more important thing, then I'm going to bed.

    According to the clinical consultant Z-medica originally sold a volcanic powder that was exothermic as a clotting agent. Not exothermic as in causing severe burns to the wound tissue, but as in raising temperatures to 110-115* F. They switched to the gauze because when a MEDEVAC or a Pedro came in, the powder would tend to blow into the eyes of those treating and carrying the casualties, causing severe eye irritation.

    When Z-Medica switched to the gauze, they had tons of the volcanic powder left. Rather than throw it away, they started packing the volcanic powder inside of gauze and selling it as the Quick Clot Sponges. https://www.altramedical.com/quikclo...otting-sponge/ It looks like it is largely discontinued, but still available.

    DO NOT mistake it for the gauze.

    You do not want to cut the sponges open, as the powder will escape.

    The principle of Quick Clot is to provide firm pressure against the bleeding location for a MINIMUM of three minutes to initiate the clotting cascade. Longer is better, but less than 24 hours.

    For example, if someone has prolonged epistaxis (nosebleed), IF YOU REALLY, ACTUALLY KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND TRULY UNDERSTAND WHERE AND WHY THE PERSON IS BLEEDING (is it in your skillset? Are they on anticoagulants? etc) you can trim the GAUZE to proper size and pack the nose tightly with the gauze and possibly nasopharanx using the gauze and have them leave it in place for 12 hours and resolve the problem a lot more easily than other older methods. Same thing with minor but persistent bleeding from the ear canal from benign causes such as earwax removal that has scratched the ear canal.

    You can't cut the sponges, since the powder escapes, as if you try to pack a space with a sponge the powder will continue to escape, and you will never achieve the pressure needed to press on the bleeding site to initiate the clotting cascade.

    I'd take the sponges over Kerlix in a pinch, but I haven't and won't buy them for any of my team's kits or guy's IFAK's. You won't find any of them in my supplies.
    Last edited by CrashAxe; 12-14-20 at 02:52.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by just a scout View Post
    https://www.narescue.com/all-product..._store=default

    Remember:

    Tourniquets are for extremities

    Quikclot is to plug holes

    Dressings cover wounds and holes

    Bandaids have a place for minor stuff and are often forgotten these days.

    Go online, do a search for “Stop the Bleed” training. And after that take a first aid or wilderness first aid class from Red Cross, American Heart Assn or ASHI.

    Toys don’t mean shit without training. That especially applies to medical stuff.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    And please, leave tampons out of your FAK.

    This is all good info. And thanks for the tip about the NAR discount. I haven't used the QC outside of training, but then again, I haven't been a field guy since it's been introduced. I really should talk to my supply people about stocking it where I work.

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