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Thread: Shipping an 80% lower

  1. #1
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    Shipping an 80% lower

    Can it be done legally, without a s/n? Probably the dumbest question you've heard all day, I know.

  2. #2
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    If it's completely unmachined, yes. Once it's been so much as kissed by a drill-bit the Rubicon is crossed; until then it's just a hunk of metal or plastic.
    You really have to ask why Conservatives have guns? Because Liberals block freeways, burn cities, throw Molotov cocktails, loot, turn over cop cars, and think this behavior is Socially Acceptable.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondback View Post
    If it's completely unmachined, yes. Once it's been so much as kissed by a drill-bit the Rubicon is crossed; until then it's just a hunk of metal or plastic.
    This.

  4. #4
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    I am going to disagree as 80% lowers are not considered the firearm, so why would it matter if you did anything to that 80% lower? If you owned a 80% lower that you finished, you are also able to sell it as well. As long as you are not buying 80% lowers to finish so you can resell them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondback View Post
    If it's completely unmachined, yes. Once it's been so much as kissed by a drill-bit the Rubicon is crossed; until then it's just a hunk of metal or plastic.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by munchie3409 View Post
    I am going to disagree as 80% lowers are not considered the firearm, so why would it matter if you did anything to that 80% lower? If you owned a 80% lower that you finished, you are also able to sell it as well. As long as you are not buying 80% lowers to finish so you can resell them.
    I think the point is that once it is above 80%, it becomes a firearm in the eyes of the law, and has to be dealt with as a firearm.

    Just because a gun isn’t serialized doesn’t mean you can ship it.


    Sent from 80ms in the future

  6. #6
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    If it is "80 percent" it is legally a lump of aluminum (or polymer). If any steps to complete beyond that have been performed you start sailing uncharted waters. I am not aware of any clearly defined boundary line in terms of law or regulation. Logically any degree short of completed would be incomplete and therefore not a firearm. But logic has very little to do with it.
    Not high speed, low drag. More like ten under, blinker on.

  7. #7
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    I know Pennsylvania made 80% lowers a “firearm,” a couple years ago, but an injunction stopped it, temporarily. While federal law currently doesn’t consider them firearms, state laws may be different.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MSW View Post
    I know Pennsylvania made 80% lowers a “firearm,” a couple years ago, but an injunction stopped it, temporarily. While federal law currently doesn’t consider them firearms, state laws may be different.
    The problem with making an 80% receiver a "firearm" is define, legally, what a 80% of a receiver is. Then I just do 79% and voilà., I'm all legal again with a hunk of steel or aluminum.

    And, if you engrave a serial number, your company's name on a random gun-shaped piece of aluminum, it doesn't make it a firearm, but engraving the outlines of pin holes apparently is.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by lysander View Post
    The problem with making an 80% receiver a "firearm" is define, legally, what a 80% of a receiver is. Then I just do 79% and voilà., I'm all legal again with a hunk of steel or aluminum.

    And, if you engrave a serial number, your company's name on a random gun-shaped piece of aluminum, it doesn't make it a firearm, but engraving the outlines of pin holes apparently is.
    Unfortunately, no. There is no legal definition of “80%,” it’s just a made up marketing term. ATF deemed 80% lowers a “non-firearm,” is all, no “80% percent.” Percent completion doesn’t legally exist. The push from the Antis is to make any “readily converted” easily machined with CNC tech a firearm. Spare parts, too. So, kits & “80%” marketing goes away.

    Idiotic? Absolutely. Capricious? Correct. A 3/4” nipple can be made into a 12 gauge zip gun & a .25” nipple is a .22LR, so where does the lunacy end? With CNC CAD/CAM, a block of aluminum is a potential receiver. When the laws were made, CNC didn’t exist, so running a vertical mill was beyond the average gun owner to machine lowers.

    It’s akin to the retarded plan of “armor piercing bullets” being redefined as “any projectile that can defeat soft body armor,” which includes all FMJ going over 2,000 fps, like most high power rifle FMJ.

    I don’t agree with any of it—it’s just what the ATF claims & the antis have gun kits & spare parts in their sights; Biden will deliver. Don’t be surprised if proof of legal ownership is required for spare parts in the future.....

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