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Thread: School me on F1 cans.

  1. #1
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    School me on F1 cans.

    I'm thinking about filing and slapping together one of these kits. Just for grins mostly.

    I'd love to hear some input and recommendations.
    Not high speed, low drag. More like ten under, blinker on.

  2. #2
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    Most, if not all, of the more reputable kit makers (e.g. Superior Precision and Ecco) aren’t selling them anymore since the recent ATF crackdown on Quietbore. That said, those two were who I was going to go with.

  3. #3
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    I believe some are still, but you have to have an approved Form1 first.

  4. #4
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    I have a couple f1 cans, but I made them from scratch, not a kit.
    So, just remember to file your paperwork first, and don't start your build until it comes back approved, and follow pretty closely what you filed.
    NRA Life, SASS#40701, Glock Advanced Armorer
    Gunsmith for Unique Armament Creations LLC, 07/SOT

    VIGILIA PRETIUM LIBERTATIS

  5. #5
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    We did one. A titanium kit from Superprecisonconcepts. As a Non-machinist with only a drill press and regular hand tools, it was A LOT of work. It's fun project and interesting. But in the end, it's really much easier to buy a manufacturer's can.

    If you factor in your time & labor, the savings isn't really there. It's more of a fun/hard challenge in my opinion.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by markm View Post
    We did one. A titanium kit from Superprecisonconcepts. As a Non-machinist with only a drill press and regular hand tools, it was A LOT of work. It's fun project and interesting. But in the end, it's really much easier to buy a manufacturer's can.

    If you factor in your time & labor, the savings isn't really there. It's more of a fun/hard challenge in my opinion.
    Also given the slim markups on factory suppressors I can't see any advantage to home builds.
    It's hard to be a ACLU hating, philosophically Libertarian, socially liberal, fiscally conservative, scientifically grounded, agnostic, porn admiring gun owner who believes in self determination.

    Chuck, we miss ya man.

    كافر

  7. #7
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    I never figured to save money, and I assumed I would end up with a lesser product than a factory can. I just thought it might be an interesting and educational project. I had also thought I might end up with a can I could experiment and take more risks with if I could easily get replacement "almost baffles". Sounds like that may have been true in the past, but no more. Bummer, ATF F'ed it up for everybody again. I wonder how long it will be before simply owning a few tools becomes a violation of NFA/GCA68?

    I guess if I want to learn more about can construction and theory I'll have to make some kind of deal with Pappas.
    Not high speed, low drag. More like ten under, blinker on.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by utahjeepr View Post
    I never figured to save money, and I assumed I would end up with a lesser product than a factory can. I just thought it might be an interesting and educational project. I had also thought I might end up with a can I could experiment and take more risks with if I could easily get replacement "almost baffles". Sounds like that may have been true in the past, but no more. Bummer, ATF F'ed it up for everybody again. I wonder how long it will be before simply owning a few tools becomes a violation of NFA/GCA68?

    I guess if I want to learn more about can construction and theory I'll have to make some kind of deal with Pappas.
    Be glad we are beyond "wipes" technology. I remember when those rubber donuts constituted unregistered suppressor components.
    It's hard to be a ACLU hating, philosophically Libertarian, socially liberal, fiscally conservative, scientifically grounded, agnostic, porn admiring gun owner who believes in self determination.

    Chuck, we miss ya man.

    كافر

  9. #9
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    I cannot argue the materials/time vs just buying cost, and I have a lathe and a mill, as well as a commercial grade tig welder.
    But, I had more time than cash. I built an entirely titanium 308 suitable can for $250 in materials, and my time, spent occasionally over several weeks.
    Plus, it let me spread out the expenses.
    A good exercise in how a suppressor works.

    But, not really a big cost savings.
    NRA Life, SASS#40701, Glock Advanced Armorer
    Gunsmith for Unique Armament Creations LLC, 07/SOT

    VIGILIA PRETIUM LIBERTATIS

  10. #10
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    It's totally worth doing once, even at a negative cost over buying. It's cool to have a one of a kind can, and nice when it's just as good in performance as a factory.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

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