Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 45

Thread: Weightlifting?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    1,798
    Feedback Score
    49 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by aFella View Post
    Anyone workout in a home gym? What are your main quad lifts? Getting a bit bored of switching between squats (some variation there too. ssb squats / hatfield squats) and BSS. Wish I had room for more equipment.
    Look up the Military Athlete "Quadzilla". That, and I lunge walk to failure between sets of squats.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    northern CA
    Posts
    916
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by aFella View Post
    Anyone workout in a home gym? What are your main quad lifts? Getting a bit bored of switching between squats (some variation there too. ssb squats / hatfield squats) and BSS. Wish I had room for more equipment.
    It may get boring, just embrace it. In order to have a home gym with lots of options is expensive. Squats, front squats, goblet squats, and zercher squats you can rotate those exercises. You can add in things like step ups, and box jumps. As others have mentioned lunges as well. Lifting is a marathon and not a sprint embrace the grind.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2021
    Posts
    34
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by jstone View Post
    Weight gainers are garbage. Use your normal protein and add peanut butter, oats, and some other better ingredients to increase calories. The carbs in these Gainer are nothing but maltodextrin or something similar. Over 200 grams of maltodextrin is stupid. It's a waste of money maltodextrin is cheap, why pay a huge markup for something you can get for pennies a serving. Dextrin, maltodextrin, branched chain cyclic dextrin and similar carb source have there place like when using insulin even then your never going to need 200 grams of it in a serving.
    100%. Very good advice here!

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,888
    Feedback Score
    27 (100%)
    KISS.

    Eat quality balanced meals. Stop eating junk. Stay away from supplements, and if you do, stick with Creapure Creatine Monohydrate and a high quality whey protein (MyProtein is cheap ranks in top ten for purity). Sleep a minimum of 7.5 hours a night (average sleep cycle is 1.5hrs or something like that). Follow a good training regimen.

    Some good sources:

    Athlean-X
    Shredded Sports Science
    Will Brink

    There are a handful of others but like with firearm parts and accessories, do your research; the internet is filled with straight up bad bullshit information, especially the in the fitness realm.

    There is no secret or shortcut (unless you start cycling that caprisun). It is a marathon, not a sprint.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Maine, U.S.A.
    Posts
    337
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by P2Vaircrewman View Post
    Here is a question, how do you know when you have reached your peak strength for a particular muscle or muscle group. Obviously age has to play a part. A person at 20 can be stronger than he can at 60 but to what degree. Incremental resistance builds strength but you can't keep building strength indefinitely, sooner or later it will get as strong as it will ever get no matter how hard it is worked. How do you know when you have reached that point.
    Honestly you can always get stronger at any age. At a certain point our body will stop producing the acids that our DNA needs to rebuild our cells. This happens as we age. If you get sleep, nutrition, hydrate, and expose your body to resistance, you will increase your ability to produce these acids. Its far more complicated but I am simplifying the process.

    As far as strength: training involves micro tears and repair. It takes a long time to build muscle. If you start lifting you will gain a good deal of blood volume initially. This is not muscle it does however support your muscle. You lift consistently, and get the nutrients you need and allow for recover: you will slowly gain. If you reach a point where a disease (like age) impacts your ability to train you need to address the cause or adapt your training. Simply by increasing your training in a safe manner you are increasing your body's production of these acids and you will reproduce healthier cells. Fasting can also increase these acids. But everyone has different systems with different needs.

    Your muscle size equals your load carrying ability. With strength comes size. So if you push your limits consistently and take care of your body, you will grow in strength and size. You may need protein isolate, aminos, and other supplements, vitamins, and minerals. If you figure out what your body is lacking, you can see gains.

    I press 205 overhead 12 reps, slow negatives. I curl 75+ dumbbells. And I can leg press well over 1000. I'm 6ft 2. The heavy athletes can lift more because of their size: I'm tiny compared to them. You will build faster with lots of nutrition and lean protein. Good luck and get out there and lift!

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Louisiana, On I-10 west of NOLA, east of BR
    Posts
    401
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Core781 View Post
    Honestly you can always get stronger at any age. At a certain point our body will stop producing the acids that our DNA needs to rebuild our cells. This happens as we age. If you get sleep, nutrition, hydrate, and expose your body to resistance, you will increase your ability to produce these acids. Its far more complicated but I am simplifying the process.

    As far as strength: training involves micro tears and repair. It takes a long time to build muscle. If you start lifting you will gain a good deal of blood volume initially. This is not muscle it does however support your muscle. You lift consistently, and get the nutrients you need and allow for recover: you will slowly gain. If you reach a point where a disease (like age) impacts your ability to train you need to address the cause or adapt your training. Simply by increasing your training in a safe manner you are increasing your body's production of these acids and you will reproduce healthier cells. Fasting can also increase these acids. But everyone has different systems with different needs.

    Your muscle size equals your load carrying ability. With strength comes size. So if you push your limits consistently and take care of your body, you will grow in strength and size. You may need protein isolate, aminos, and other supplements, vitamins, and minerals. If you figure out what your body is lacking, you can see gains.

    I press 205 overhead 12 reps, slow negatives. I curl 75+ dumbbells. And I can leg press well over 1000. I'm 6ft 2. The heavy athletes can lift more because of their size: I'm tiny compared to them. You will build faster with lots of nutrition and lean protein. Good luck and get out there and lift!
    Stronger yes, but how do you determine when you are as strong as you will ever get. Seems every time I try to push beyond some weight, be it the bench press, dead lift, curl, etc I end up hurt. Maybe that is my body telling me "hey old man stop right here, just maintain".

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    261
    Feedback Score
    35 (100%)
    Several things come to mind. Make sure you're warming up. Seems to get more important to me every year that goes by.

    When I warm up for barbells in a cold garage I normally row for 5 to 10 mins. Then start with an empty bar and work up to my work sets.

    Good rest at night and between workout days is important as well. If you're getting older and lifting 4 or 5 times a week maybe try switching to 2 or 3 times a week.

    Also, don't forget to deload every once in a while. It may be you're just overtraining. I fell into that trap earlier this year.

    With regard to genetic potential I'm not sure when any of us will really know for sure. Here's a great video from Dr Mike Israetel that might help answer that question:

    https://youtu.be/r8zcF6Ut7lo


    Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    82
    Feedback Score
    0
    If you're new to this.... I'd go with the starting strength linear progression.

    https://startingstrength.com/

    If you get past that there's lots more out there... but this is a good start.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Maine, U.S.A.
    Posts
    337
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by P2Vaircrewman View Post
    Stronger yes, but how do you determine when you are as strong as you will ever get. Seems every time I try to push beyond some weight, be it the bench press, dead lift, curl, etc I end up hurt. Maybe that is my body telling me "hey old man stop right here, just maintain".
    You have likely reached a peak load for your existing system. Change variables in your system to counter deficiencies. It may require some research and testing but you should be able to find ways to improve upon your system. Find your protein requirements, calorie requirements. Do an analysis based on age, weight, and activity levels for your nutrition. You may need more than protein. Creatine is good but you do not need it to build, it is effective, but not needed. It requires more hydration and puts more stress on your system. If you are healthy enough to take it, consult a doc and go for it, I use it. Aminos and arginine is more important at supporting your system. I make a custom mix of high end aminos, because no one sells them in the quantities I need. I also use cordyceps militaris. I mix my creatine blend in.


    Don't think of your max as a ceiling, change your max. Example: if you max at xlbs @ 12 reps. Consider finding your 1•xlbs max, or 6•xlbs if you are prone to injury. Do a compound set. 1 rep 12 times. Do not do the same routine for over three weeks and expect consistent gains. You need to alter your reps and sets and change up the way you are lifting every month. You'll also avoid repetitive injury.

    And cardio is critical for gains. If you increase your cardio you will see gains.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    northern CA
    Posts
    916
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Core781 View Post
    You have likely reached a peak load for your existing system. Change variables in your system to counter deficiencies. It may require some research and testing but you should be able to find ways to improve upon your system. Find your protein requirements, calorie requirements. Do an analysis based on age, weight, and activity levels for your nutrition. You may need more than protein. Creatine is good but you do not need it to build, it is effective, but not needed. It requires more hydration and puts more stress on your system. If you are healthy enough to take it, consult a doc and go for it, I use it. Aminos and arginine is more important at supporting your system. I make a custom mix of high end aminos, because no one sells them in the quantities I need. I also use cordyceps militaris. I mix my creatine blend in.


    Don't think of your max as a ceiling, change your max. Example: if you max at xlbs @ 12 reps. Consider finding your 1•xlbs max, or 6•xlbs if you are prone to injury. Do a compound set. 1 rep 12 times. Do not do the same routine for over three weeks and expect consistent gains. You need to alter your reps and sets and change up the way you are lifting every month. You'll also avoid repetitive injury.

    And cardio is critical for gains. If you increase your cardio you will see gains.
    This is bro science, hypertrophy is truly not understood how to achieve it like strength. Changing you program every 3 weeks is stupid. Step loading, wave loading, and variable overload are a few methods for gaining strength that are proven. There is a reason every guru like Hany Rambod, Neil Hill, and Chris Aceto have different methods to achieve hypertrophy. We know what I takes to get stronger, if we knew the same about hypertrophy everyone would be following just a couple methods.

    If you look at the best trainers out there with the biggest athletes not a single one will have you change your training ever three weeks. To say cardio enhances gains is also not true, blanket statements like that are more bro science BS.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •