Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 45

Thread: Weightlifting?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    31
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    This sheet has been a great guide, keep it simple:


  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,197
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by MR_JOSHUA View Post
    This sheet has been a great guide, keep it simple:

    That actually isnt a bad chart to follow. I think many people (including mysef at times) overthink things. Just getting in the gym and doing a workout is what counts. My time is limited these days and i go to the gym 2 days a week, but also get some form of exercise in everyday.

    I do chest/bi's Monday (i like to do push/pull so do bi's instead of tri's), back, shoulders, tris Wednesday, and do legs and abs at home Friday or Saturday depending on schedule as i have a rack at home.

    Has been working for me. Start off with heavy compound movements and move to isolation. I generally stay in the 8-15 rep range for everything except abs. I also get daily cardio in at work on teh treadmill, bike, or elliptical, during lunch and my breaks

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    4,898
    Feedback Score
    22 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by MR_JOSHUA View Post
    This is a good read. Not a waste of time...

    I think that is spot-on. I also think a lot of people--men and women--need to ask what, exactly, they want out of their body. Do they want to be a showman (showlady? showperson?) and have 2% BF? Do they want to be a powerlifter? Or do they want to be fit? And by 'fit,' do they want functional fitness, 'combat' fitness, or mere maintenance? There are some commonalities, there are intrinsic/extrinsic differences in approaches to all of these.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    31
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckman View Post
    I think that is spot-on. I also think a lot of people--men and women--need to ask what, exactly, they want out of their body. Do they want to be a showman (showlady? showperson?) and have 2% BF? Do they want to be a powerlifter? Or do they want to be fit? And by 'fit,' do they want functional fitness, 'combat' fitness, or mere maintenance? There are some commonalities, there are intrinsic/extrinsic differences in approaches to all of these.
    Great summary there.
    Example -
    The guy in the top pic is a 3% showman or "gymshark" (100% aesthetics)
    The guy in the lower pic is a professional fighter (combat fitness, full athlete)


  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Louisiana, On I-10 west of NOLA, east of BR
    Posts
    400
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by MR_JOSHUA View Post
    This sheet has been a great guide, keep it simple:

    Could you expand a little on the pic as far as the actual exercises you do such as when working bi's and tri's and chest. This is my present program.

    1st DAY
    BENCH PRESS-BAR+______________________________
    SEATED ROW machine___________________________________
    DELTOIDS machine______________________________________
    BICEP CURL machine_____________________________________
    SQUAT-BAR+____________________________________
    PULLUPS________________________________________

    2nd DAY
    SITTING SQUAT________________________________
    CABLE FLY_____________________________________
    SRUG-BAR+____________________________________
    PULLUPS______________________________________
    SHOULDER PRESS-machine__________________________
    TRICEPT PUSHDOWN cable____________________________

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    North West Indiana
    Posts
    1,969
    Feedback Score
    0
    I went to basic training in 1981, a 136 pound pencil necked geek. Started pumping iron at my first duty station in Germany. (West Germany back then) Within a few years I was around 190, and pretty damn strong. By Desert Storm, I was an Infantry Drill at Benning and benched a personal best of 480 for 3 reps. By Y2K I had my first shoulder surgery. In Iraq, in 2005 an IED made things worse. I retired in '09, got fat (gained 50 pounds) and I doubt I could throw up much over 200 pounds today... if that. I have to use "perfect pushup" stands to do push ups because of wrist problems. Overall, I'd say go for it, with one caveat... Stay healthy, and don't quit, or you'll lose all your gains very quickly.
    Last edited by daddyusmaximus; 05-13-21 at 12:06.
    You know what I like best about most people?

    Their dogs.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Posts
    2
    Feedback Score
    0
    A benefit of weightlifting is that is helps increase bone density. As you get older this definitely a benefit.

    If you are just starting out a upper body routine and a lower body routine may see more strength gains than splitting up muscle groups. Upper body day 1, lower body day 2. Rest day. Repeat.

    Dont forget to stretch. Especially for us older people. Warm up is important to avoid injuries and get the blood flowing.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    northern CA
    Posts
    916
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by MR_JOSHUA View Post
    Great summary there.
    Example -
    The guy in the top pic is a 3% showman or "gymshark" (100% aesthetics)
    The guy in the lower pic is a professional fighter (combat fitness, full athlete)

    The guy in the top picture is not even close to 3% body fat, he is sub 10%, but not even close to 3%.

    This is what being in the 5% range looks like.
    maxresdefault.jpg
    images (1).jpeg

    That gymshark athlete would get blown off any stage he stepped even at an NPC show.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Eastern Colorado
    Posts
    143
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by P2Vaircrewman View Post
    Here is a question, how do you know when you have reached your peak strength for a particular muscle or muscle group. Obviously age has to play a part. A person at 20 can be stronger than he can at 60 but to what degree. Incremental resistance builds strength but you can't keep building strength indefinitely, sooner or later it will get as strong as it will ever get no matter how hard it is worked. How do you know when you have reached that point.
    Short of injury, there’s no need to ever stop progressing.

    If you start with a basic program like Stronglifts 5x5, a two day split, and you fail a set you de-load by 10% for that lift and work your way back up again.

    When de-loading alone doesn’t work, decrease your progression... add half the normal weight, or weight only every other workout, or every third.

    When you’ve done that a while and eventually reach a point where you’re stalled again you change the pattern... go to 5x3 for that lift instead.

    When you’re doing 5x3 for half your lifts, maybe you change programs entirely... go to a three day split instead of two days.

    Eventually you reach the point where you’re working each major group once per eeek.

    Keep in mind there are 3 components to fitness: strength, endurance, flexibility. You have to get the other 2 in with your strength training.
    Last edited by tanksoldier; 05-24-21 at 16:35.
    "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Louisiana, On I-10 west of NOLA, east of BR
    Posts
    400
    Feedback Score
    0
    A human can't keep progressing forever, sooner or later you reach a strength point you can't go beyond no matter what you do or how much you do. That point is determined by age, body composition and physical size.

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •