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Thread: Leather conditioner

  1. #11
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    This is an "old school" solution but works: unsalted butter.
    The old time, hand-made saddle makers recommended this. I have a 30+ year old saddle that's never had anything but unsalted butter used on it and it looks new.

  2. #12
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    One I forgot is neatsfoot oil. I know a lot of people that swear by it for saddles and tack.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDM View Post
    This is an "old school" solution but works: unsalted butter.
    The old time, hand-made saddle makers recommended this. I have a 30+ year old saddle that's never had anything but unsalted butter used on it and it looks new.
    No smell or greasiness? I would think an animal fat might go rancid over the years, but no?

    Thanks everyone for you replies.

  4. #14
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    The leather should be warm, but not hot.
    You rub the butter in and it is absorbed. Moisturizes the leather.
    This really only works on a leather that has not had a varnish or finish applied like most pistol holsters.
    Messy? yes. Smelly? not really, the leather which absorbs it.

  5. #15
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    +1 For Obenauf’s Heavy Duty LP and their their water shield as well. Used both extensively in a boots soaked in salt water environment and can attest to how well it helped my boots hold up. I’ve also used it on some Saddleback Leather products I own, even over the owner’s penchant to “chamberlains leather milk”. I found that product to make the leather look chalky as it’s a water based. Personally, I stay away from mink and neatsfoot, though.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by just a scout View Post
    I’ve been told Ballistol is really good for leather.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    The classics, like mink oil & saddlesoap...but yes, Ballistol is GREAT on leather.
    " Be NOT ye afraid of them..
    Remember the Lord, for He is GREAT & TERRIBLE!
    FIGHT for your bretheren..for your sons & for your daughters,
    for your wives & for your households"!

  7. #17
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    I've been using some this Bee Balm, which works pretty well: https://beyondclothing.com/products/beyond-bee-balm. I've used in on my Beyond gloves, other leather work gloves, and some other leather products. Handy container, low viscosity and no leaks. Eucalyptus smells pleasant. No ill effects on anything yet.
    2012 National Zumba Endurance Champion
    الدهون القاع الفتيات لك جعل العالم هزاز جولة الذهاب

  8. #18
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    Bickmore Apache Oil for most of my boots and leather rifle slings. Best stuff!!!

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