Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Medical Kit

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    70
    Feedback Score
    0

    Medical Kit

    In addition to a well stocked Trauma Kit I've assembled the following Medical kit to cover booboos and medical issues that can be addressed with OTC meds.

    This isn't a Trauma kit; that is separate and covers everything beyond Bandaids. It's built in the same bag as my Trauma kit but is a different color and is obviously tagged differently. Comments? Suggestions? What have I overlooked?

    I'm having my wife write up a Pediatric kit with meds appropriate for the Grandkids as they can't take adult doses.

    Here's what's currently contained in this kit but in no particular order:

    Bandaids of various sizes
    Q Tips
    Hand wipes
    Butt wipes
    Cough Drops
    Benadryl tablets
    Primatene mist inhaler (epinephrine)
    Decongestant tablets
    Allergy antihistamine tablets
    Tylenol
    Ibuprofen
    Anti-diarrheal tablets
    Anti-nausea/motion sickness tablets
    Tums
    Pedialyte powder
    Cortisone anti-itch cream
    Triple Antibiotic ointment
    Dental cream
    Eye drops
    After Bite pen
    Alcohol wipes
    Magnifying glass
    magnifying mirror compact
    tweezers
    Tic remover
    Tissues

    141.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    400
    Feedback Score
    0
    I have a sick call kit next to my trauma kit that I keep similarly loaded out. Besides meds, some stuff I also pack (I'm also in healthcare, so some of the items may not necessarily be of any use for you):
    - Wound care/closure (Betadine/Hibiclens, 4x4s, sutures, etc.)
    - HEENT (Oto/opthalmoscope, saline solution, eye shields, etc.)
    - Dental (orajel, floss)
    - Assessment (BP cuff/steth/pulse ox)
    - Ortho (splints)
    - Burns (burn dressing)
    If plan A didnít work, the alphabet has 25 more letters.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    475
    Feedback Score
    0
    I don't know what your medical background is, so if you're not in the field I suggest a BLS/ACLS/ATLS course. Perhaps some Tac Med training as well. An EMT basic course? Wilderness medicine course ? A myriad of training /educational options exist.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    70
    Feedback Score
    0
    Firefighter EMT for the past 20 years. Also worked search and rescue and provided medical for my team in the USAF.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    70
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thanks for the feedback. I appreciate it.

    I have all of that in my large Trauma kit except for the OTO scope, but I think I'm ordering a one for my Squad kit. The "dental cream" is Orajel type; added that after a comment on another forum.

    I have four levels of kits: a large bin with resupply and for "home" use, a large Squad kit that contains larger stuff and greater quantities, small trauma kits (same bag as these but larger than IFAKs), and now these OTC med kits.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    E. Tennessee
    Posts
    2,360
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)
    For this type of kit (based on current contents) I would add burn creams and some packs of electrolytes.
    Quote Originally Posted by fyrediver View Post
    In addition to a well stocked Trauma Kit I've assembled the following Medical kit to cover booboos and medical issues that can be addressed with OTC meds.

    This isn't a Trauma kit; that is separate and covers everything beyond Bandaids. It's built in the same bag as my Trauma kit but is a different color and is obviously tagged differently. Comments? Suggestions? What have I overlooked?

    I'm having my wife write up a Pediatric kit with meds appropriate for the Grandkids as they can't take adult doses.

    Here's what's currently contained in this kit but in no particular order:

    Bandaids of various sizes
    Q Tips
    Hand wipes
    Butt wipes
    Cough Drops
    Benadryl tablets
    Primatene mist inhaler (epinephrine)
    Decongestant tablets
    Allergy antihistamine tablets
    Tylenol
    Ibuprofen
    Anti-diarrheal tablets
    Anti-nausea/motion sickness tablets
    Tums
    Pedialyte powder
    Cortisone anti-itch cream
    Triple Antibiotic ointment
    Dental cream
    Eye drops
    After Bite pen
    Alcohol wipes
    Magnifying glass
    magnifying mirror compact
    tweezers
    Tic remover
    Tissues

    141.jpg
    ETC (SW/AW), USN (1998-2008)
    CVN-65, USS Enterprise

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    6,694
    Feedback Score
    23 (100%)
    Oral electrolytes are a good idea.

    Burn cream is a waste of space and money. Simple burns really don't need anything, and severe partial-thickness/full-thickness, it doesn't help. Burn dressing, sure. Burn gel, OK, up to you.

    If you carry meds make sure you rotate stock and check expiry dates.

    Sutures in austere environment is close to useless for most people for most reasons.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    6,694
    Feedback Score
    23 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by drsal View Post
    I don't know what your medical background is, so if you're not in the field I suggest a BLS/ACLS/ATLS course. Perhaps some Tac Med training as well. An EMT basic course? Wilderness medicine course ? A myriad of training /educational options exist.
    ACLS is overkill unless you are a paramedic or work in a hospital. ATLS is a physician/mid-level-only course (non-providers can audit it), and essentially little value to out-of-hospital medical care. First responder or even basic first aid with Stop The Bleed is the sweet spot, good for everyone. Unless one is on a tac team, tac med does not offer any advantages that Stop The Bleed won't cover.

    I am all for training, training, and more training, but just like gear and guns, mission drives the training and the gear: what is the purpose, and what can I (legally) do? (relative to the cert/license/training)
    Last edited by chuckman; 04-28-21 at 12:20. Reason: spellin'

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    70
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thanks for the feedback; Pedialyte powder are electrolytes so thatís covered. One of the antibiotic ointments is also pain reduction component and can be used for mild burns.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    475
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by fyrediver View Post
    Firefighter EMT for the past 20 years. Also worked search and rescue and provided medical for my team in the USAF.
    Outstanding ! You are more than well versed in providing medical aid to those under your care !

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •