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  1. #1
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    Medical Kit

    In addition to a well stocked Trauma Kit I've assembled the following Medical kit to cover booboos and medical issues that can be addressed with OTC meds.

    This isn't a Trauma kit; that is separate and covers everything beyond Bandaids. It's built in the same bag as my Trauma kit but is a different color and is obviously tagged differently. Comments? Suggestions? What have I overlooked?

    I'm having my wife write up a Pediatric kit with meds appropriate for the Grandkids as they can't take adult doses.

    Here's what's currently contained in this kit but in no particular order:

    Bandaids of various sizes
    Q Tips
    Hand wipes
    Butt wipes
    Cough Drops
    Benadryl tablets
    Primatene mist inhaler (epinephrine)
    Decongestant tablets
    Allergy antihistamine tablets
    Tylenol
    Ibuprofen
    Anti-diarrheal tablets
    Anti-nausea/motion sickness tablets
    Tums
    Pedialyte powder
    Cortisone anti-itch cream
    Triple Antibiotic ointment
    Dental cream
    Eye drops
    After Bite pen
    Alcohol wipes
    Magnifying glass
    magnifying mirror compact
    tweezers
    Tic remover
    Tissues

    141.jpg

  2. #2
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    I have a sick call kit next to my trauma kit that I keep similarly loaded out. Besides meds, some stuff I also pack (I'm also in healthcare, so some of the items may not necessarily be of any use for you):
    - Wound care/closure (Betadine/Hibiclens, 4x4s, sutures, etc.)
    - HEENT (Oto/opthalmoscope, saline solution, eye shields, etc.)
    - Dental (orajel, floss)
    - Assessment (BP cuff/steth/pulse ox)
    - Ortho (splints)
    - Burns (burn dressing)
    If plan A didnít work, the alphabet has 25 more letters.

  3. #3
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    I don't know what your medical background is, so if you're not in the field I suggest a BLS/ACLS/ATLS course. Perhaps some Tac Med training as well. An EMT basic course? Wilderness medicine course ? A myriad of training /educational options exist.

  4. #4
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    Firefighter EMT for the past 20 years. Also worked search and rescue and provided medical for my team in the USAF.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by fyrediver View Post
    Firefighter EMT for the past 20 years. Also worked search and rescue and provided medical for my team in the USAF.
    Outstanding ! You are more than well versed in providing medical aid to those under your care !

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by drsal View Post
    I don't know what your medical background is, so if you're not in the field I suggest a BLS/ACLS/ATLS course. Perhaps some Tac Med training as well. An EMT basic course? Wilderness medicine course ? A myriad of training /educational options exist.
    ACLS is overkill unless you are a paramedic or work in a hospital. ATLS is a physician/mid-level-only course (non-providers can audit it), and essentially little value to out-of-hospital medical care. First responder or even basic first aid with Stop The Bleed is the sweet spot, good for everyone. Unless one is on a tac team, tac med does not offer any advantages that Stop The Bleed won't cover.

    I am all for training, training, and more training, but just like gear and guns, mission drives the training and the gear: what is the purpose, and what can I (legally) do? (relative to the cert/license/training)
    Last edited by chuckman; 04-28-21 at 11:20. Reason: spellin'

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckman View Post
    ACLS is overkill unless you are a paramedic or work in a hospital. ATLS is a physician/mid-level-only course (non-providers can audit it), and essentially little value to out-of-hospital medical care. First responder or even basic first aid with Stop The Bleed is the sweet spot, good for everyone. Unless one is on a tac team, tac med does not offer any advantages that Stop The Bleed won't cover.

    I am all for training, training, and more training, but just like gear and guns, mission drives the training and the gear: what is the purpose, and what can I (legally) do? (relative to the cert/license/training)
    As a semi retired physician, who used to work with various allied health providers, and unaware of his background, I merely provided various suggestions :-)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by drsal View Post
    As a semi retired physician, who used to work with various allied health providers, and unaware of his background, I merely provided various suggestions :-)
    Yeah, no worries. As a physician, the world is your oyster and all. For everyone else, there are a lot of hard ceilings on what we can and can't take, much less do and don't do. Again, I am all for train, train, and train again. Almost anyone can audit most any course in which they cannot obtain a cert.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the feedback. I appreciate it.

    I have all of that in my large Trauma kit except for the OTO scope, but I think I'm ordering a one for my Squad kit. The "dental cream" is Orajel type; added that after a comment on another forum.

    I have four levels of kits: a large bin with resupply and for "home" use, a large Squad kit that contains larger stuff and greater quantities, small trauma kits (same bag as these but larger than IFAKs), and now these OTC med kits.

  10. #10
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    For this type of kit (based on current contents) I would add burn creams and some packs of electrolytes.
    Quote Originally Posted by fyrediver View Post
    In addition to a well stocked Trauma Kit I've assembled the following Medical kit to cover booboos and medical issues that can be addressed with OTC meds.

    This isn't a Trauma kit; that is separate and covers everything beyond Bandaids. It's built in the same bag as my Trauma kit but is a different color and is obviously tagged differently. Comments? Suggestions? What have I overlooked?

    I'm having my wife write up a Pediatric kit with meds appropriate for the Grandkids as they can't take adult doses.

    Here's what's currently contained in this kit but in no particular order:

    Bandaids of various sizes
    Q Tips
    Hand wipes
    Butt wipes
    Cough Drops
    Benadryl tablets
    Primatene mist inhaler (epinephrine)
    Decongestant tablets
    Allergy antihistamine tablets
    Tylenol
    Ibuprofen
    Anti-diarrheal tablets
    Anti-nausea/motion sickness tablets
    Tums
    Pedialyte powder
    Cortisone anti-itch cream
    Triple Antibiotic ointment
    Dental cream
    Eye drops
    After Bite pen
    Alcohol wipes
    Magnifying glass
    magnifying mirror compact
    tweezers
    Tic remover
    Tissues

    141.jpg
    ETC (SW/AW), USN (1998-2008)
    CVN-65, USS Enterprise

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