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Thread: DFW freeway shootout; CCW overmatch?

  1. #1
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    DFW freeway shootout; CCW overmatch?

    A recent freeway shooting in DFW had a biker block traffic on the freeway and walk back towards an SUV. Apparently, the biker already had gun drawn and the SUV driver gave him verbal warning before retrieving handgun and firing in defense.

    https://dfw.cbslocal.com/2021/06/29/...-worth-police/

    Very little detail has been reported, but I got to thinking what factors led to the SUV driver prevailing. In a scenario that basically started as roadrage and led to a gunfight, the biker stopped traffic and jammed up the SUV. It was essentially an ambush. I think there was another article that stated the defender fired multiple shots and the assailant fired one. Was the defender more determined than the assailant? Better trained? Lucky?

    It makes me rethink the traditional idea of smaller guns for concealed carry and self-defense. From the military overmatch philosophy, I would think training with full-size pistol and reddot, at minimum, or a PCC would be a good idea for ready access inside the vehicle.

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    Literally a poster case of “don’t start nothing, won’t be nothing”.

    FWIW not legal to lane split in TX.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DirectTo View Post
    Literally a poster case of “don’t start nothing, won’t be nothing”.

    FWIW not legal to lane split in TX.
    It’s clearly obvious who was in the wrong, but that’s not the discussion I’m hoping to have. The biker was under 21 and carrying a loaded handgun in public and threatening deadly force. I think those are all greater offenses than lane splitting. The point I’m trying to discuss is from the perspective of the SUV driver, who was essentially in a (poorly executed) vehicular ambush.

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    So:

    The SUV driver accidentally tried switching lanes into the biker.
    Biker decides to set an ambush for the SUV driver in an attempt to get even.
    Biker threatens SUV driver with gun.
    SUV driver gives verbal warnings to stay the F away.
    Biker continues to approach with a firearm in hand.
    Biker takes a forever nap.

    Sounds like a good shoot to me.
    ..It was you to me who taught
    In Jersey anythings' legal, as long as you don't get caught.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex V View Post
    Biker continues to approach with a firearm in hand.
    Biker takes a forever nap.
    The part between those two lines is what was in my thoughts this morning. Biker had advantage of gun drawn. The SUV driver had advantage of concealment and maybe stable platform by bracing on the door frame? Engagement distance? Calibers? I guess this would all be in the police report and eventually public info, but I was just thinking about what factors were in favor of the SUV driver that helped him and his family survive unharmed.

    If my vehicle was purposely jammed up and I was attacked/robbed, would I want maximize engagement distance or wait until assailants came up to my car?
    Last edited by crosseyedshooter; 07-15-21 at 11:50.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crosseyedshooter View Post
    A recent freeway shooting in DFW had a biker block traffic on the freeway and walk back towards an SUV. Apparently, the biker already had gun drawn and the SUV driver gave him verbal warning before retrieving handgun and firing in defense.

    https://dfw.cbslocal.com/2021/06/29/...-worth-police/

    Very little detail has been reported, but I got to thinking what factors led to the SUV driver prevailing. In a scenario that basically started as roadrage and led to a gunfight, the biker stopped traffic and jammed up the SUV. It was essentially an ambush. I think there was another article that stated the defender fired multiple shots and the assailant fired one. Was the defender more determined than the assailant? Better trained? Lucky?

    It makes me rethink the traditional idea of smaller guns for concealed carry and self-defense. From the military overmatch philosophy, I would think training with full-size pistol and reddot, at minimum, or a PCC would be a good idea for ready access inside the vehicle.
    If I'm reading you right, your concern is with the effectiveness of the tiny pistol as opposed to more full size 15+ rounds RDS equipped pistol, along with having a carbine readily accessible in the car for such "ambush" type scenarios. The only reason I remember for the carrying of the micro pistol is because it's more comfortable. I for one would not give up ammo and shootability for comfort, I want a piece that I'm much more likely to make my hits with when I'm jacked up on adrenalin and my mind is racing. I would think the rifle would probably need to be uber accessible to make any real difference in the fight, like on the seat next to you.

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    Was it worth it? Dumbass.
    The simple fact of the matter is this, America has never not been great.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomMcC View Post
    If I'm reading you right, your concern is with the effectiveness of the tiny pistol as opposed to more full size 15+ rounds RDS equipped pistol, along with having a carbine readily accessible in the car for such "ambush" type scenarios.
    Yes, from a CCW perspective, the pistol is the primary and should have highest proficiency. Especially in the summer, if the most common carry guns are 3” barrel micro compact with 6-10 rounds, I dunno how I’d feel with one of those in this type of scenario.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crosseyedshooter View Post
    A recent freeway shooting in DFW had a biker block traffic on the freeway and walk back towards an SUV. Apparently, the biker already had gun drawn and the SUV driver gave him verbal warning before retrieving handgun and firing in defense.

    https://dfw.cbslocal.com/2021/06/29/...-worth-police/

    Very little detail has been reported, but I got to thinking what factors led to the SUV driver prevailing. In a scenario that basically started as roadrage and led to a gunfight, the biker stopped traffic and jammed up the SUV. It was essentially an ambush. I think there was another article that stated the defender fired multiple shots and the assailant fired one. Was the defender more determined than the assailant? Better trained? Lucky?

    It makes me rethink the traditional idea of smaller guns for concealed carry and self-defense. From the military overmatch philosophy, I would think training with full-size pistol and reddot, at minimum, or a PCC would be a good idea for ready access inside the vehicle.
    But you don't know who used what and from how far away! The driver could have used a NAA 22lr from 50ft away!

    The biker could simply have been trying to intimidate and didn't think he would be shot. As far as the biker getting a shot off ...well that doesn't mean anything. Could have been muscles tensing up after getting hit.

    There's really not enough info to draw any kind of conclusion except that when you draw your gun it's not to intimidate. If that happens to work, great! But thats not the intention

    Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk

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    I think this situation boils down pretty simply.

    Biker kid had a temper and a gun. His gun made him feel like a big man, so when he was disrespected, he figured he could whip it out to help make his point about how big of a man he was. He expected the SUV driver to cower in fear at his display of manliness.

    SUV driver wasn't playin'...

    All this pistol, rifle, overmatch stuff is just mental masturbation. The SUV driver prevailed because he wasn't ****ing around or flexin'...He was dead ass serious. It's mindset.

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