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Thread: Beretta APX grip module for 92 mags...

  1. #1
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    Beretta APX grip module for 92 mags...

    Many people do not realize that the Beretta APX has a non-serialized grip frame that is readily replaceable like the P320.

    I would LOVE to see an PAX grip module using 92 mags.

    Then I could have a modern polymer framed striker fired beretta that would use all those 92 mags that I have and that are among the most common and popular pistol mags out there.

    TED

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    APX mags are only $15-$25, so they are relitively cheap. I agree about the APX though. I own over 30 (lost count) handguns, and the APX is my favorite and what I carry. Carry it over my Glocks, M&P 2.0 Compact, HK P30sk, etc. It's better built and more reliable than the problematic P320.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Styx View Post
    APX mags are only $15-$25, so they are relitively cheap. I agree about the APX though. I own over 30 (lost count) handguns, and the APX is my favorite and what I carry. Carry it over my Glocks, M&P 2.0 Compact, HK P30sk, etc. It's better built and more reliable than the problematic P320.
    What makes your APX better than your M&P 2.0C?

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    I can not answer for Styx, but for me, it was better trigger and not as aggressive texture. I love my APX. and i am in the same boat as styx, well over 20 hanguns off all types. The APX just works works with me naturally.

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    Quote Originally Posted by robbins290 View Post
    I can not answer for Styx, but for me, it was better trigger and not as aggressive texture. I love my APX. and i am in the same boat as styx, well over 20 hanguns off all types. The APX just works works with me naturally.
    I love the M&P texture because 10m with a sheet of sandpaper and you can customize the texture to what you want where you want.

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    I suspect that if Beretta could have made 92 mags work in the APX, they would have. Engineering a chassis system for at least three frame sizes and therefore mag bodies probably requires enough work already without then being slaved to mag release placement and other dimensional things.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron3 View Post
    What makes your APX better than your M&P 2.0C?
    Complete breakdown for cleaning and/or parts replacement is much, much simpler. You don't have to remove the rear sight to strip the slide like you do with the M&P 2.0. Being that the APX is a chassis system, I can pull the guts out of the APX frame and only have two pins, a takedowm lever, and the chassis to reinstall. With the M&P, it's a headache. I should know because it was a PITA to install the full competition APEX trigger into my M&P Compact so that it could have the a trigger simular to what the APX has out the box.I can also switch between a Compact and Subcompact frame with 2 to 3 minutes.

    The APX also feels much better in my hand. I can manipulate all the controls without altering my grip. The trigger gaurd is under cut and the grip is positioned further underneath the slide which allows you to control the recoil better. Instead of a little indentation on the frame, the APX's magazine floor plate flairs out with will better allow you to yank the mag out during a malfunction.

    The front of the APX's slide contours inward and the barrel sticks out a little to allow for contact shots without pushing the slide out of battery. The recoil spring assembly last for 20k rounds before needing to be replaced according to Beretta.

    Beretta offers different color and sizes of grip frames. You can buy a safety equipped grip frame for the fullsize APX of you so choose. Beretta offers factory 10, 13, 15, 17, and 21 round mags for the APX. Beretta also offers a factory aluminum magwell and +2 mag extention as well as extended magazine release, threaded barrel, and heavy competition recoil spring assemblies. There is also a factory competition Green Striker Spring Assembly that dropped my trigger from a consistent 6lb down to a consistent 4 to 4.5lbs.

    Last but not least, I just shoot it better.

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    I had a Centurion APX, but sold it last year after I got a 5th Gen Glock 19. The 5th Gens got me back into Glock. And, the G19 5th gen felt better to me.

    Once I got the stock sights swapped out to Ameriglo sights on the APX< I did like it more. But, I have small hands - and to stop shooting it to the left, I had to switch to the largest backstrap. That solved the problem, and the gun was accurate for me. But, it just didn't feel as good in the hands.

    After the $100 rebate I got on it, the gun was like $269. I just wasn't feeling it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Styx View Post
    Complete breakdown for cleaning and/or parts replacement is much, much simpler. You don't have to remove the rear sight to strip the slide like you do with the M&P 2.0. Being that the APX is a chassis system, I can pull the guts out of the APX frame and only have two pins, a takedowm lever, and the chassis to reinstall. With the M&P, it's a headache. I should know because it was a PITA to install the full competition APEX trigger into my M&P Compact so that it could have the a trigger simular to what the APX has out the box.I can also switch between a Compact and Subcompact frame with 2 to 3 minutes.

    The APX also feels much better in my hand. I can manipulate all the controls without altering my grip. The trigger gaurd is under cut and the grip is positioned further underneath the slide which allows you to control the recoil better. Instead of a little indentation on the frame, the APX's magazine floor plate flairs out with will better allow you to yank the mag out during a malfunction.

    The front of the APX's slide contours inward and the barrel sticks out a little to allow for contact shots without pushing the slide out of battery. The recoil spring assembly last for 20k rounds before needing to be replaced according to Beretta.

    Beretta offers different color and sizes of grip frames. You can buy a safety equipped grip frame for the fullsize APX of you so choose. Beretta offers factory 10, 13, 15, 17, and 21 round mags for the APX. Beretta also offers a factory aluminum magwell and +2 mag extention as well as extended magazine release, threaded barrel, and heavy competition recoil spring assemblies. There is also a factory competition Green Striker Spring Assembly that dropped my trigger from a consistent 6lb down to a consistent 4 to 4.5lbs.

    Last but not least, I just shoot it better.
    I forgot about the rear sight to remove the striker. I've done it a few times and while not a big deal, I'd certainly rather not do it. (Clean threads of screw then reapply blue loctite)

    I didn't care for the finger humps on the APX, its overall width, and the trigger, while fairly crisp, felt heavy. The pistol was quite new, though. I was mixed on it and was hoping I'd like it more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron3 View Post
    I forgot about the rear sight to remove the striker. I've done it a few times and while not a big deal, I'd certainly rather not do it. (Clean threads of screw then reapply blue loctite)

    I didn't care for the finger humps on the APX, its overall width, and the trigger, while fairly crisp, felt heavy. The pistol was quite new, though. I was mixed on it and was hoping I'd like it more.
    Both the APX and the M&P 2.0 have an approx 6lb trigger from the factory; however, the APX trigger can be dropped to even more by a $15 factory spring change. After the first thousand rounds after installing the factory green Competition Striker Spring Assembly, my trigger weight is a crisp 4.5ish lbs. The APX has a flat faced trigger vs the unpopular hinge trigger on the 2.0. Either way, they aren't competition or target pistols. Both triggers are good enough to be on target during a self defense situation. The Compact and Centurion do not have finger grooves, and being a module pistol, Beretta also offers a grip module for the full size APX in 4 different colors the WITHOUT the finger grooves. Unlike with most other manufacturers, you aren't stuck with one particular color or configuration after you're purchase.

    I assume that you have a M&P 2.0 Compact and a APX Fullsize? Well the Full-size is the equivalent to the Glock 17 in dimensions, so yes, it's going to be a more pronounced weight and size difference.


    M&P 2.0 on the top. APX on the bottom. The slide width is about the same. The APX has the large backstrap installed and the 2.0 has the small installed IIRC, so that's why the APX's grip is fatter.

    The APX Centurion is only 0.7oz heavier than the M&P 2.0 Compact 4" and only an one and a half ounces heavier than the M&P 3.6". Not much of a weight difference. Both pistols are listed at 1.3 inches wide. The width is the same. The only difference that near the top the slide only, the front half near the muzzle end of the M&P 2.0's slide contours inward giving the 2.0 the appearance of being a much thinner gun when it is in fact not. The fact that the 2.0's slide is dehorned and the APX is more blocky like a Glock also give the appearance of being much thinner, but the actual widths are about the same.

    I detail clean my carry gun every time after I go to the range. Having to repeatedly push out my rear sight and then push it back in possibly slightly changing my point of impact from where I expect it to be is a big deal for me. I use red loctite on my dovetail sights whenever I install aftermarket sights on my handguns because I do not plan on switching them out again for at least 8 to 10 years or more.
    Last edited by Styx; 09-17-21 at 08:59.

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