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Thread: Monoclonal Antibody Infusion availability.

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by mRad View Post
    You’re absolutely right. I’ve seen it work miracles on people. I’ve seen people see symptoms almost gone 24 hours after the infusion. It doesn’t do much good outside the window. The best results are within about five days to be honest.
    Yeah when you're failing on high-flow O2 in the ICU and they're waving an ET tube in front of your face it ain't gonna do shit. Too late at that point.

    I think we have found, after 18 months of this shit, a significantly effective treatment modality and IMHO as much, if not more, effort and $$$ should be spent to attain it as the vaunted vaccine.
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ABNAK View Post
    Yeah when you're failing on high-flow O2 in the ICU and they're waving an ET tube in front of your face it ain't gonna do shit. Too late at that point.

    I think we have found, after 18 months of this shit, a significantly effective treatment modality and IMHO as much, if not more, effort and $$$ should be spent to attain it as the vaunted vaccine.
    Funny you say that, my wifeís cousin had a script for antibodies to treat her case of COVID. She was denied by the infusion center two or three times. She ended up outside the window and continued to decline. She ended up on Hi-Flow and is now intubated day 12. Sheís not going to make it. What would antibodies have done for her?

    The reason why she was denied? ďIt was too riskyĒ because her vital signs were outside normal limits. O2 was less than their normal range of 94%.


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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by mRad View Post
    Funny you say that, my wife’s cousin had a script for antibodies to treat her case of COVID. She was denied by the infusion center two or three times. She ended up outside the window and continued to decline. She ended up on Hi-Flow and is now intubated day 12. She’s not going to make it. What would antibodies have done for her?

    The reason why she was denied? “It was too risky” because her vital signs were outside normal limits. O2 was less than their normal range of 94%.
    You know I would, under normal circumstances, ask the usual "What is her age and what are her co-morbidities?" While those factors still have an impact to a some degree even with COVID, this shit can be pretty unpredictable as far as it's "one-off" victim count.
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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by ABNAK View Post
    You know I would, under normal circumstances, ask the usual "What is her age and what are her co-morbidities?" While those factors still have an impact to a some degree even with COVID, this shit can be pretty unpredictable as far as it's "one-off" victim count.
    Her age is about 30. She has a comorbidity that should have made her a better candidateÖMD.


    Another of my wifeís friends died of COVID this morning. 50, active, 25 year old fiancť, no comorbidities, in shape, only knock against his health was he was a light smoker and light drinker.


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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by mRad View Post
    Youíre absolutely right, we use cheap common meds to treat COVID and they help quite a bit. Iíve even listed many of the common ones so people can look it up for themselves.

    But at the same time, many of the patients needing admission I see are vaccinatedóto the tune of 3/4. The vaccination rate for the population I serve is a bit over 70%. Fortunately, I havenít had to admit any to an ICU; usually itís progressive care or medical. So sure, the vaccine is hopefully saving the most at-risk and keeping them out of ICU beds. But Iím seeing very sick vaccinated people. And as most know, Delta hits people the hardest much later than the Alpha variant did.


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    We are seeing about the opposite here, itís in an area with a lower vaccination rate than others though and we get lots of patients from rural areas that are very low and donít think itís something that can affect them. Statistics class tells us that if we have a highly vaccinated population itís not a surprise if more vaccinated people are the ones being infected. Doesnít mean the vaccine isnít working, you need more data to get the full picture and see how many cases it is preventing. Most of the vaccinated patients being seen for covid are old, immunocompromised, or a number of commorbidities, often more than one of those attributes. A number of vaccinated patients test positive but are there for unrelated procedures, itís good that they are not having a bad go with covid but it causes extra precautions to be taken at the same time.

    All I really care about is preventing strain on our hospitals and deaths. Cases donít bother me as long as itís not something that causes serious damage. For example, an unvaccinated 30 year old, skinny guy, without any health issues was admitted for around 10 days and has been home for weeks now. He still canít walk to the bathroom from his bed without needing oxygen. His lungs are pretty wrecked and I wouldnít be surprised if this causes him long term damage. Thatís the scary thing to me thatís not seen in the media/by the general population as much as the deaths and people in the ICU. The number of young and ďhealthyĒ unvaccinated people being admitted for covid is MUCH higher than it was previously, delta has changed the game for sure.

    Like Iíve seen ABNAK say, if covid has a bullet with your name on it then youíre in trouble and youíre essentially playing Russian roulette. Getting vaccinated can dramatically lower the number of rounds in the chamber though. Itís up to each individual to make that choice but if anyone has studied basic statistics you can see the probability of a bad outcome from the vaccine is immensely lower than a bad outcome from a positive covid diagnosis with all else held constant. With the obvious disclaimer if you have legitimate health issues preventing you from being vaccinated.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Life's a Hillary View Post
    We are seeing about the opposite here, itís in an area with a lower vaccination rate than others though and we get lots of patients from rural areas that are very low and donít think itís something that can affect them. Statistics class tells us that if we have a highly vaccinated population itís not a surprise if more vaccinated people are the ones being infected. Doesnít mean the vaccine isnít working, you need more data to get the full picture and see how many cases it is preventing. Most of the vaccinated patients being seen for covid are old, immunocompromised, or a number of commorbidities, often more than one of those attributes. A number of vaccinated patients test positive but are there for unrelated procedures, itís good that they are not having a bad go with covid but it causes extra precautions to be taken at the same time.

    All I really care about is preventing strain on our hospitals and deaths. Cases donít bother me as long as itís not something that causes serious damage. For example, an unvaccinated 30 year old, skinny guy, without any health issues was admitted for around 10 days and has been home for weeks now. He still canít walk to the bathroom from his bed without needing oxygen. His lungs are pretty wrecked and I wouldnít be surprised if this causes him long term damage. Thatís the scary thing to me thatís not seen in the media/by the general population as much as the deaths and people in the ICU. The number of young and ďhealthyĒ unvaccinated people being admitted for covid is MUCH higher than it was previously, delta has changed the game for sure.

    Like Iíve seen ABNAK say, if covid has a bullet with your name on it then youíre in trouble and youíre essentially playing Russian roulette. Getting vaccinated can dramatically lower the number of rounds in the chamber though. Itís up to each individual to make that choice but if anyone has studied basic statistics you can see the probability of a bad outcome from the vaccine is immensely lower than a bad outcome from a positive covid diagnosis with all else held constant. With the obvious disclaimer if you have legitimate health issues preventing you from being vaccinated.
    And Iím not trying to say that the vaccine doesnít help. You can see before I have stated our hospitalizations of vaccinated vs unvaccinated are on par with the vaccination rate of those we serve. We are also quite rural, here. My point is and has been the vaccine isnít nearly as effective as we were told and not is it fool-proof. Vaccinated people should not have a false sense of security because they are vaccinated. I canít tell you the number of people that are downright angry when they find out their symptoms are because they are COVID positive; they are in disbelief.

    The public as a whole needs to know and understand they can still contract symptomatic cases. They often tell me ďI canít get it, Iím immune! I got both shots!Ē


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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mRad View Post
    And Iím not trying to say that the vaccine doesnít help. You can see before I have stated our hospitalizations of vaccinated vs unvaccinated are on par with the vaccination rate of those we serve. We are also quite rural, here. My point is and has been the vaccine isnít nearly as effective as we were told and not is it fool-proof. Vaccinated people should not have a false sense of security because they are vaccinated. I canít tell you the number of people that are downright angry when they find out their symptoms are because they are COVID positive; they are in disbelief.

    The public as a whole needs to know and understand they can still contract symptomatic cases. They often tell me ďI canít get it, Iím immune! I got both shots!Ē


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    I could not agree more. If this pandemic has taught me anything itís people will politicize the dumbest things and the general public is even more uneducated than I previously thought (and thatís considering the number of democrat voters I already knew existed prior).

    The one thing about the vaccine vs monoclonal treatment is the vaccine is a HELL of a lot cheaper. I say make the monoclonal treatment as available as possible and give that out to anyone who can take it that pops positive but when youíre looking at effectiveness per dollar the vaccine wins in a landslide. I wish I owned stock in Regeneron though because they are going to be crushing it.

  8. #38
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    I’m about 28 hours post monoclonal. I do feel better, maybe 30%. Someone asked if I had a Rx or positive test. I had a positive test, no Rx from a Dr.

    There was an elderly woman in the chair next to me getting it as well. She was fully vaccinated and contracted it.

    Throughout my entire experience I have been amazed at how unconcerned all of my HCP’s have been. Very nonchalant. I told my first doctor how scared I was based of the news and hospitalizations and she said, “Yeah, stop watching the news. When we were seeing a real surge, 100 patients a day, there was nothing on the news about it. You’re going to be fine.” Everyone has been like that.
    When you're done saying what you're saying, stop saying it.

  9. #39
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    Haven't heard or seen squat on anything hindering tx availability, but suspect if this supply situation is indeed moving in a deviant direction in regards to availability we are still in our infancy...Fl as always is on point & we have abbott with his finger in the air watching Desantis waiting to see which way the wind blows before reacting.


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  10. #40
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    Maybe someone who isn't vaccinated would take monoclonal antibodies , but I'd bet that if you are anti-vax most people would not be not a huge fan of the antibodies. Maybe not.
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