Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Taking a class with armor?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    423
    Feedback Score
    0
    Practice how you play. If you plan on wearing armor in real time than an intro class is good place to start. I wouldn’t wear it for the full class though. Depending on your level of fitness I would try to wear it for half the day. It does get rather tiring and cumbersome after that. And yes, will become a distraction. You’ll learn there’s a big difference shooting prone with or without body armor for example. Also try and have someone video you as you draw your pistol from your holster and conduct reloads. It’s a great way to see what’s working and not working. If you like pouches in certain locations etc. Years back I took a Paul Howe class and he videoed everyone on the draw and pistol manipulations. Was very beneficial.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    1,718
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)
    In specific military shooter courses you will shoot for weeks (daily) "Clean," with a minimum of equipment to get the basics of shooting down before adding gear.

    Stuff is added in increments -- Army practical training methodology is crawl-walk-run.

    Three-day commercial classes (Friday - Sunday) really aren't long enough for a decent shooter to require being "Jocked up" complete with armor and Dome of Obedience (especially in the summer). It may help for people to consider how they configure their stuff -- where are my magazines, do pouches interfere with mounting the carbine, or stowing it for pistol transition.

    There's a pain-in-the-ass cost to wearing stuff, and it can detract from training once it interferes with learning progression.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,948
    Feedback Score
    9 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by sinister View Post
    In specific military shooter courses you will shoot for weeks (daily) "Clean," with a minimum of equipment to get the basics of shooting down before adding gear.

    Stuff is added in increments -- Army practical training methodology is crawl-walk-run.

    Three-day commercial classes (Friday - Sunday) really aren't long enough for a decent shooter to require being "Jocked up" complete with armor and Dome of Obedience (especially in the summer). It may help for people to consider how they configure their stuff -- where are my magazines, do pouches interfere with mounting the carbine, or stowing it for pistol transition.

    There's a pain-in-the-ass cost to wearing stuff, and it can detract from training once it interferes with learning progression.
    Where is the “like” button so I can stomp on it?
    AQ planned for years and sent their A team to carry out the attacks, and on Flight 93 they were thwarted by a pick-up team made up of United Frequent Fliers. Many people look at 9/11 and wonder how we can stop an enemy like that. I look at FL93 and wonder, "How can we lose?". -- FromMyColdDeadHand

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    28,016
    Feedback Score
    14 (100%)
    I personally don't like to wear a bunch of gear in classes. But I've seen guys with deuce gear set ups that work great for them cuz they have a lot of their mags, etc. on them.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    SW WA
    Posts
    699
    Feedback Score
    5 (100%)
    If you have been training with plates go for it. If they will be a distraction, I would skip them.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    A Little Here And A Little There
    Posts
    2,874
    Feedback Score
    80 (100%)
    For the OP, it's kinda of all about the combo of you and the class.
    Are you a real new shooter? Or kinda know what you're doing and this class is more a skill enhancer/refresher?
    How far away is the date of the class, and how new are you to setting up/wearing your tac gear? You may be able to gain some pre-familiarity by simply running dry drills around your house/yard, which will massively cut down any potential 'blue screen' moments in class. .

    Long story short, if you want to wear your gear, wear it. Do NOT change it in any way for the class outside what you expect to wear it configured as, so you get true feedback for yourself. If anyone tries to 'tactical timmy' you, well, laugh and drive on. They'll never get it.
    WORST that can possibly happen, is you find out real fast where all your failure points are, or you see that it's dragging down your skill progression in the class - you can always take it off later in the class, it's not glued to you...
    IF it was my class, I'd never stop anyone from wearing their gear, as I understand that, without a "cool" range or private land, that may be the only time a student gets to wear their go-to kit for real. So I doubt you'll have a problem from that end - it's really all about you, and what you can deal with.

    I also think a lot of folks really spend to much time overthinking the addition of extra gear to their shooting regimen, class attendance, whatev. Like, just do it. Stop thinking, and just do it. If it works first time, great, if not, now you know and can fix whatever the problem is.

    A couple personal anecdotes-
    My first "serious" class I'd never worn any LBE type gear to any other shooting event, and what I got was brand new guesswork about 2 months before the class. I only spent some time setting it up, adjusting, dry-running a few times before diving into the class. I had reasonable proficiency with shooting/reloads/malf clearance though. I really expected to have a hard time, given the much more advanced tactics in the class than I was used to, and unfamiliar gear. But everything went fine - I spent the the class having zero issues acclimating to the equipment addition, and wondering why about a 3rd of the rest of the class were sucking so hard, if my dumb ass had no problems getting my shit together.
    I suspect my due diligence in actually ADJUSTING my new kit properly for me, and gaining some basic familiarity with how everything worked played a big part in that, VS some of the other attendees who it was VERY clear had never worn their kit before that day... I also had good shooting fundamentals gained at previous events, or by myself, without using gear.

    However, the third class around was a different story - I thought I had a good level of proficiency going in, and I wore the same gear that had worked fine for me the previous few classes. However, the class material was covering things that I had zero familiarity with.
    What. An. Absolute. Clusterf***.
    Aside from the new class material that was essentially drinking from a firehose, I went into that weekend class tired from a bonkers week at work. I then discovered that my shooting skills were simply not up to par to meet the demands of tactics that required a completely new style of shooting (my gun was still set up fine, it was just me). On top of that, my gear, while set up fine for the previous classes, was now completely unsuitable for a total 180 swap in what my LBE needed to do during this class, and I spent the whole class fighting with that shit, along with everything else. It was dumb, and I felt dumb during the class because things weren't working as expected (which probably further impacted my mental ability to absorb info by compounding exhaustion). I STILL learned plenty, but maybe I'd have learned more and bluescreened less, if I had gone into it more prepared, OR realized what was wrong during the class, which I didn't because I was to focused on trying to take in the info and keep up.

    So, like I said, it's all up to YOU making a no-BS assessment of where you are, or maybe pushing the envelope a bit to find out. You never learn if you don't push.
    Last edited by Jellybean; 01-14-22 at 23:43.
    "Once we get some iron in our souls, we'll get some iron in our hands..."

    "...A rapid, aggressive response will let you get away with some pretty audacious things if you are willing to be mean, fast, and naked."-Failure2Stop

    "The Right can meme; the Left can organize. I guess now we know which one is important." - Random internet comment

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    97
    Feedback Score
    0
    You've gotten some excellent guidance in this thread.

    I'll notee that unless the armor proves an operational impediment to you or the class, it never hurts to have armor on when a bunch of people are shooting guns around you.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Posts
    37
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    Yes thank you all for your well thought responses. It has added a lot to consider and is much appreciated.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    1,111
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thank you for asking this. I'm going to go to a few classes this year and had the same question. I just don't want to look like an idiot if I were the only one their with lvl4 plates on


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    1,718
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)
    If you feel you NEED to wear Level 4 armor because of the proficiency of others in your class I submit you probably need to find a different instructor.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •