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Thread: Med Books

  1. #1
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    Med Books

    Is there any recommended books out there that would be good to purchase for study of basic first aid, 1st responders , manuals. etc.? Something reputable that can be used for reference and helpful before taking a class?

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    Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured (Book & Navigate 2 Essentials Access) https://www.amazon.com/dp/128408017X...0EQTS1P0GHEJ3H


    This is the standard for teaching EMTs.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  3. #3
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    There are a million. Search by publisher rather than author. They all teach to the same testing objectives. Mosby, Brady, AAOS. Pick one that's cheap and with a pretty cover.

    https://www.textbooks.com/Catalog/VAF/EMT-and-EMT-P.php

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    I van suggest https://www.amazon.com/Washington-Ma...s%2C161&sr=8-7

    More then you need but this older version is like 4 bucks in good condition.

  5. #5
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    TLDR: What kind of course are you looking into?

    I’d recommend Anatomy and Physiology (A&P) first if you have the time, inclination, and money, but others have already provided good recommendations. Its kinda like having solid shooting (and safety) fundamentals before trying to go into a shoothouse or PRS/USPSA/IDPA/3GN match. If you’re only looking for Firefighter 1/First Responder level (the scope of practice, not the broad term) or cop level stuff with little or no interest in going higher, the EMT (Basic) textbooks alone will certainly suffice. And Chuckman nailed it for that.

    There are probably First Responder textbooks, but I have no experience with them. Don’t mess with the Paramedic or EMT-P textbooks unless you’ve already got the basic knowledge covered and have already enrolled in that course. And if you get to that point, I HIGHLY recommend proper two-part college A&P ahead of that. IMO, it should be a pre-req.

    Consider downloading the Deployed Medicine App. Its free, its an official DoD teaching resource, and it has many videos at the Infantryman level. It is also usable offline if you download the stuff, which is essentially the original purpose for it.

    Also, consider taking a BLS/CPR course from AHA/ARC/ASHI.

    But, here are four A&P options:

    https://books.google.com/books/about...d=WzL1uwEACAAJ Don’t laugh. When I told “Pineapple” I was thinking about re-classing to be a 68w and going to SOCM, and asked him what I needed to buy at the bookstore first, its what he told me to get, with a straight face. And he said this knowing that I could get free samples of textbooks, and also had more experience than the typical grunt.

    https://www.pearson.com/store/p/huma...E&gclsrc=aw.ds This one is my own favorite, and the favorite of my ex-wife, who is an A&P professor. It was also the favorite of my other A&P professor at the time.

    https://openstax.org/details/books/a...and-physiology This one is free, according to the same ex-wife. She says its gaining popularity.

    And a bonus option: https://www.mheducation.com/highered...259709166.html I have no personal experience with this one, and don’t know anyone personally that does, but it appears to be more medically oriented and it is inexpensive.

    Paging @GTF425 to the chat.
    Last edited by 1168; 03-14-22 at 18:50. Reason: Clarity
    RLTW

    “What’s New” button, but without GD: https://www.m4carbine.net/search.php...new&exclude=60 , courtesy of ST911.

    Disclosure: I am affiliated PRN with a tactical training center, but I speak only for myself. I have no idea what we sell, other than CLP and training. I receive no income from sale of hard goods.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by just a scout View Post
    Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured (Book & Navigate 2 Essentials Access) https://www.amazon.com/dp/128408017X...0EQTS1P0GHEJ3H


    This is the standard for teaching EMTs.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    I second this.

    All through my EMT and AEMT courses, I wanted to try something different. I ended up buying a bunch of books thinking that somehow it was going to be better and I was going to get ahead, but other than a really good book on Anatomy & Physiology, it was a waste of money.

    Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured for EMT and Advanced Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured for AEMT has everything you need.

    Just understand that none of this certifies you or gives you licensure to practice but I doubt that’s what you’re after.


    ETA: The post above mine is good, too. Listen to what he says.
    Last edited by WillieThom; 03-16-22 at 15:10.
    Yet it is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succor of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields that we know, so that those who live after may have clean earth to till.

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    Yet it is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succor of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields that we know, so that those who live after may have clean earth to till.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1168 View Post
    Paging @GTF425 to the chat.
    I'll ponder this thread and edit my post.

    In the meantime; to echo WilleThorn, I've been through 3 different textbooks for my EMT classes, and they're all the same. The AAOS EMT text is the most digestible and well formatted.

    An AHA BLS class and Stop the Bleed will teach you the most important, truly lifesaving skills you'll need. EMT School is to be a gateway into EMS or to jazzercise your application for PA/Med School. Way more training than you'll need if not going those two roads.

    A great A&P text for a surface level, working knowledge is THIS ONE
    Last edited by GTF425; 03-16-22 at 18:48.

  9. #9
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    Thanks everyone for the posts and links. I'm also looking into maybe for my sons birthday do a weekend class together for basics like CPR, AED, things like that. Something he could carry on through life to help him with his family and to have a little knowledge for life saving scenerios. I"d be looking for a reputable training class thats actually has been in real world scenarios.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ridgerunner70 View Post
    I'm also looking into maybe for my sons birthday do a weekend class together for basics like CPR, AED, things like that. Something he could carry on through life to help him with his family and to have a little knowledge for life saving scenerios.
    I would strongly encourage you to take an American Heart Association BLS Provider class. You'll learn how to perform CPR on adults, children, and infants, as well as how to operate an AED. Additionally, you'll discuss stroke recognition and will learn how to help relieve choking in an adult or infant.

    You can find classes near you through this link: AHA Class Network.

    If you don't have an AHA training center near you, take a look at a Red Cross BLS class. You can find their available courses AT THIS LINK.

    With the training center I'm affiliated with, all of the instructors are experienced ER/ICU Nurses or Paramedics. You can't go wrong attending a class through the AHA, as training centers won't go through the process of affiliating an instructor who isn't capable of teaching to the standard. For what it's worth; the AHA BLS Class is pretty much the gold standard for healthcare providers who don't also need the higher level classes (ACLS/PALS/NRP/etc.).

    A basic Stop the Bleed class will cover lifesaving hemorrhage control techniques and teach the proper applications of a tourniquet as well as how to pack wounds, apply various dressings, etc. Combined with a formal BLS class, you'll have truly lifesaving skills for the types of emergencies that can kill you before a Paramedic arrives. You can find scheduled Stop the Bleed classes AT THIS LINK.

    For skills that go beyond what those courses will offer, look into wilderness medicine type training. You'll learn skills such as how to splint fractures, recognize environmental emergencies (heat stroke/hypothermia/etc.), and will get the benefit of learning how to improvise materials for these types of skills. I don't have a recommendation for Missouri, but you want to look for Wilderness First Aid classes. An example of one is HERE, to give you an idea what type of curriculum to look for and expect.

    Lastly, a decent little pocket manual for trauma skills management is The U.S. Army TCCC Handbook. It's $2 on Kindle and while it's written for an audience with formal medical training, you can learn a lot of useful skills and have an idea what to expect in formal training. No it's not as comprehensive as the current Ranger Medical Handbook or as in-depth as dedicated trauma textbooks, but it's $2 and gives a useful survey of the information at a digestible level for a bystander which you can reference after receiving hands-on training.

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