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Thread: Cold weather gear

  1. #11
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    Some sort of insulation to keep you off the ground while static is very helpful to prevent heat loss via conduction. You can just sit on your ruck in a pinch, but having an actual sleeping pad of some sort for if you have to bivy out would be better. There are also very light bivy sacks that would be much easier to set-up and get into than just a tarp.
    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

    老僧三十年前未參禪時、見山是山、見水是水、及至後夾親見知識、有箇入處、見山不是山、見水不是水、而今得箇體歇處、依然見山秪是山、見水秪是水。

    https://www.instagram.com/defaultmp3/

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wake27 View Post
    Last thing, my old unit that specializes in arctic warfare doesn’t use jetboil. I forget the brand but there’s one that’s either rated to lower temps or is more reliable in those temps. Not super helpful since I don’t remember the name but you can probably find it.

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    Probably MSR. They were popular when I was stationed in Alaska.

  3. #13
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    Canister stoves will always suffer in cold weather. Even the highest quality ones, such as the MSR Reactor that has regulated output (Jetboil also has regulated output stoves), paired with a canister that is high in isobutane, you're still going to have issues in the extreme old, anything under 10 °F. There are ways around that, such as manually heating up the canister with a lighter, using a moulder strip/alpine bomb, putting the canister in water during operation, getting a canister stove that can take an upside down canister, etc. Liquid stoves are going to be much more reliable in cold weather, albeit less convenient.
    Last edited by Defaultmp3; 02-01-23 at 16:44.
    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

    老僧三十年前未參禪時、見山是山、見水是水、及至後夾親見知識、有箇入處、見山不是山、見水不是水、而今得箇體歇處、依然見山秪是山、見水秪是水。

    https://www.instagram.com/defaultmp3/

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ubet View Post
    . My big heavy coat is a Filson packer with a shearling collar and it is somehow shoved into this bag.
    You reminded me of the Filson catalogs through the years where one of the user endorsements was from a bush plane pilot who crashed in sub freezing temps and was trapped in the wreckage for hours(maybe a day or 2) and credited a large part of his survival to wearing a Filson wool coat that kept him from freezing. That was probably the toughest endorsement I recall, but the others were similar and for the longest time that kind of scenario played the primary role in Filson's marketing.

    Last catalog I saw still had a lot of that, but the clothes were starting to change some and one of the life saving endorsements was some dude waiting a few minutes on a train or bus in Boston just a few pages over from bush plane fellow's story..


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    Last edited by jsbhike; 02-02-23 at 17:49.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wake27 View Post
    . Last thing, my old unit that specializes in arctic warfare doesn’t use jetboil. I forget the brand but there’s one that’s either rated to lower temps or is more reliable in those temps.
    This look like it?

    https://www.msrgear.com/stoves/liqui...ove/11043.html

    From what I have read, those seem to be kind of a gold standard for melting snow and well below freezing weather cooking.

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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsbhike View Post
    You reminded me of the Filson catalogs through the years where one of the user endorsements was from a bush plane pilot who crashed in sub freezing temps and was trapped in the wreckage for hours(maybe a day or 2) and credited a large part of his survival to wearing a Filson wool coat that kept him from freezing. That was probably the toughest endorsement I recall, but the others were similar and for the longest time that kind of scenario played the primary role in Filson's marketing.

    Last catalog I saw still had a lot of that, but the clothes were starting to change some and one of the life saving endorsements was some dude waiting a few minutes on a train or bus in Boston just a few pages over from bush plane fellow's story..
    Wool is still a gold standard. Even when it's wet it stays warm. A lot of my cold weather clothing is Arc'teryx, but I still wear wool sweaters over a LS layering shirt.

    Quote Originally Posted by jsbhike View Post
    This look like it?

    https://www.msrgear.com/stoves/liqui...ove/11043.html

    From what I have read, those seem to be kind of a gold standard for melting snow and well below freezing weather cooking.
    MSR makes great stoves; I have used one for years down to -10ish.

    Now I get no real enjoyment out of cold weather and my tolerance just isn't what I use to be, so I rarely need the capability or stuff I once needed.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckman View Post
    Wool is still a gold standard. Even when it's wet it stays warm. A lot of my cold weather clothing is Arc'teryx, but I still wear wool sweaters over a LS layering shirt.



    MSR makes great stoves; I have used one for years down to -10ish.

    Now I get no real enjoyment out of cold weather and my tolerance just isn't what I use to be, so I rarely need the capability or stuff I once needed.
    I hope the better recovery news direction sticks so you can get back at it.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsbhike View Post
    I hope the better recovery news direction sticks so you can get back at it.
    Thank you, I really appreciate it.

    I am making plans to start hiking the mountain to sea trail in North Carolina, it will be in sections but my goal is to do all of it.

  9. #19
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    Cold weather gear

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckman View Post
    Thank you, I really appreciate it.

    I am making plans to start hiking the mountain to sea trail in North Carolina, it will be in sections but my goal is to do all of it.
    I wish I was closer to the mountains in NC. ENC is flat and boring AF. This is the first I’ve heard of this though, seems kind of cool based on a real quick search.


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    Last edited by Wake27; 02-12-23 at 13:55.
    Sic semper tyrannis.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wake27 View Post
    I wish I was closer to the mountains in NC. ENC is flat and boring AF. This is the first I’ve heard of this though, seems kind of cool based on a real quick search.


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    The trail is a real bear in the mountains, but you are right in that once you get to the piedmont or eastern part of the state it can get boring. But you can also make time and haul A if you need to. Some sections you can easily do in a weekend. The Durham County section follows the Eno River, mostly in Eno River State Park, and is doable in a long day.

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