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Thread: Your can is too hot to cook with. It's time to leave...

  1. #21
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    I factor in cool time.

    One of the best things about cold weather shooting in Iowa.

    Just laid the guns in the grooves of a wood pallet in the bed of a pickup. Drove to the food sport a mile a way and they were all chilly.
    It's hard to be a ACLU hating, philosophically Libertarian, socially liberal, fiscally conservative, scientifically grounded, agnostic, porn admiring gun owner who believes in self determination.

    Chuck, we miss ya man.

    كافر

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteyrAUG View Post
    Drove to the food sport a mile a way and they were all chilly.
    Medieval Times?

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Disciple View Post
    Medieval Times?
    Pizza place about a mile from our range. By the time we got there all our squirt guns and cans were cold to the touch.
    It's hard to be a ACLU hating, philosophically Libertarian, socially liberal, fiscally conservative, scientifically grounded, agnostic, porn admiring gun owner who believes in self determination.

    Chuck, we miss ya man.

    كافر

  4. #24
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    Cool the suppressor with water. You can start by misting it, then increase the amount of water used as it begins to throw off heat. One good reason for not hitting it with a bucket full of water right away is so you don't get flash cooked by the steam.
    The number of folks on my Full Of Shit list grows everyday

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  5. #25
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    I put it in the trunk of my car in a place it isn't touching anything, and I usually end range sessions with stretching and a snack before I hit the road. It's always cool enough to put in its soft case by the time I'm done.

  6. #26
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    I shoot cans a lot, from precision rifle to dedicated belt-fed machinegun cans.
    I get them hot. Really hot. Hot hot.
    I do not have the luxury of time, so I need to get off the range as quickly as possible.

    The most effective and safe way that I cool suppressors without causing damage to them or me:
    Poke a small hole in the cap of a water bottle and spray the exterior of the suppressor with it.
    I just plop the firearm on a bench, with the suppressor hanging off of the edge, and work the water stream back and forth.
    When it stops going straight to steam, I roll the gun to the other side and repeat.
    By the time the bottle is empty, the can is usually safe to bag for transport, if not cool enough to remove by hand.

    Keeping the stream small ensures that there is little run-off, as would happen if you just poured it on the suppressor, getting a high percentage of the water to vaporize, which takes a lot of energy out of the suppressor (as pointed out above), and it's super convenient.
    Dunking a hot suppressor in water is highly dangerous for a bunch of reasons, from the steam and boiling water being forced up through the bore to causing damage to the suppressor and muzzle device due to inflicting extreme temperature swings.
    I did the spray/mist thing for a bit, but the convenience of grabbing a simple water bottle and poking the cap just made it a winner.
    Jack Leuba
    Director of Sales
    Knight's Armament Company
    jleuba@knightarmco.com

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Failure2Stop View Post
    I shoot cans a lot, from precision rifle to dedicated belt-fed machinegun cans.
    I get them hot. Really hot. Hot hot.
    I do not have the luxury of time, so I need to get off the range as quickly as possible.

    The most effective and safe way that I cool suppressors without causing damage to them or me:
    Poke a small hole in the cap of a water bottle and spray the exterior of the suppressor with it.
    I just plop the firearm on a bench, with the suppressor hanging off of the edge, and work the water stream back and forth.
    When it stops going straight to steam, I roll the gun to the other side and repeat.
    By the time the bottle is empty, the can is usually safe to bag for transport, if not cool enough to remove by hand.

    Keeping the stream small ensures that there is little run-off, as would happen if you just poured it on the suppressor, getting a high percentage of the water to vaporize, which takes a lot of energy out of the suppressor (as pointed out above), and it's super convenient.
    Dunking a hot suppressor in water is highly dangerous for a bunch of reasons, from the steam and boiling water being forced up through the bore to causing damage to the suppressor and muzzle device due to inflicting extreme temperature swings.
    I did the spray/mist thing for a bit, but the convenience of grabbing a simple water bottle and poking the cap just made it a winner.
    Thanks for all of the ideas!

    This water bottle trick is a good one. ("Stop suppressor burn with this one simple trick...")

    I did order a cheap "heat resistant" pouch to put the can in. I needed something besides the factory box it came in, anyway.

  8. #28
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    I have a couple of heat resistant pads. Iíll lay them on the table because a can will melt a plastic foldable table. Iíll also wrap my can in one if itís still warm when putting it in a case.

  9. #29
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    Typically keep a pair of welding gloves in the range bag in case I need to deal with a hot can for whatever reason and have a heat/fire resistant bag to slide it into. Typically I will just open the bolt and let it cool but sometimes you just don't have the time.
    Open the pig!

  10. #30
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    Drive down the road with the can hanging out the window OR spritz it with seltzer at the range!
    "What would a $2,000 Geissele Super Duty do that a $500 PSA door buster on Black Friday couldn't do?" - Stopsign32v

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