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Thread: Components of a decent trauma kit?

  1. #1
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    Components of a decent trauma kit?

    Anyone care to list what would be prudent to carry in a small to medium sized personal trauma kit?

    Looking to get this squared away.

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    I have the Adventure Medical Trauma kit. It's a good, basic low cost kit.
    http://www.basegear.com/amk-field-trauma.html

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    Mikey, is this a carry around with you all the time kit? If it's a go-bag type kit I would skip the pain relievers and stick with the meat and potatoes. Bandages, trauma shears, gauze, etc..

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    I am NOT a medical professional of any kind....

    Looking at the military kits is a good start.

    the below in chart form

    Below information taken from here

    US ARMY IMPROVED FIRST AID KIT CONTENTS:

    NSN............................Nomenclature
    6515-01-521-7976.......Tourniquet, Combat Application
    6510-01-492-2275.......Bandage Kit, Elastic
    6510-01-503-2117 / 6510-00-058-3047 Bandage Gauze 4-1/2" 100/Pkg
    6510-00-926-8883.......Adhesive Tape Surg 2" 6's Roll
    6515-01-180-0467.......Airway, Nasopharyngeal, 28fr, 12s
    6515-01-519-9161.......Glove, Patient Exam 100/Pkg (4ea)
    6545-01-531-3647.......Pouch, IFAK
    6545-01-531-3147.......Insert, IFAK (has folding panels, with cord attached)




    USMC INDIVIDUAL FIRST AID KIT CONTENTS:

    IFAK A1 Component Individual First Aid Kit - NSN 6545-01-539-2740 (includes the following items):
    6510-01-499-9285.......3.5 oz. Quikclot Packet (1ea)
    6515-01-542-7696TK4 Tourni-Kwik Self-Application Tourniquet 40" (2ea)
    6510-01-540-6484......."H" Compression Bandage w/8" x 10" Ab Pad (2ea)
    6510-01-503-2117.......Primed Compressed Gauze 4.5" x 4.1 yards (2ea)
    8105-09-000-2725.......Pouch NSN (1ea)

    IFAK A1 Minor First Aid Kit Component NSN 6545-09-000-2727 (includes the following items):
    6510-01-514-4518.......Adhesive Bandage 2" x 4 1/2" (5ea)
    6510-00-913-7909.......Adhesive Bandages, 3/4" x 3" (10ea)
    6510-00-201-1755.......Triangular Bandages, 40"x40"x56" Non-sterile (2ea)
    6510-01-549-0927.......Combat Reinforcement Tap 2" x 100" (1ea)
    6510-01-243-5894.......Burn Dressing 4" x 16", Water-Jel (1ea)
    N/A...............................Bacitracin Antibiotic Oinment 0.9 gram (8ea)
    6505-00-914-3593.......Povidone-Iodine Topical Solution USP 10% 1/2 floz. (1ea)
    6850-00-985-7166.......Water Purification Tablets 10 Pack, Katadyn Micropur, Sodium Chlorite (1ea)
    Last edited by rob_s; 03-03-09 at 14:58.

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    The Adventure Medical Kits are a good way to start. It is nice to have a little bit of snivel gear - aspirin, sinus meds, bandaids.

    I always end up building my own, so it has what I want. It's sort of like Rob's advice on AR's: Buy your first one, then build what you want next.

    And I'll mirror his other question: How much do you want to spend, and what do you want to do with it?

    It is also a good idea to get a bit of instruction before using a tourniquet or an NP airway.

    And think about how far away from help you are. Are you going two weeks into the Alaskan bush, or shooting at a range that is just 10 minutes from a Level-1 trauma center? The range I usually shoot at is about an hour from a good trauma center. My medical kit is corresponding more complex.

    And the best medical device is the one between your ears. You can improvise a LOT if you know what you are doing, and have just some basics. But if was your daughter that got shot, you'd want some suitable gear, right?

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    INADB (I'm not a doctor but...),

    +1 on adventure medical.

    I like Rob's kit as well. I wonder if this is only for yourself or do you expect to use this on others? If so, at least one of some kind of chest seal (Asherman, Hyfin, or Bolin type) might be good to add.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SeriousStudent View Post
    And think about how far away from help you are. Are you going two weeks into the Alaskan bush, or shooting at a range that is just 10 minutes from a Level-1 trauma center?
    I think this is very important and can't be over stated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 021411 View Post
    Mikey, is this a carry around with you all the time kit? If it's a go-bag type kit I would skip the pain relievers and stick with the meat and potatoes. Bandages, trauma shears, gauze, etc..

    This would be a kit for SHTF situation on my vest or go-bag. I carry a pretty decent first aid kit(bandaids, asprin, a few rolls of gauze and tape, shears, etc.) in each of my vehicles for minor stuff. I'm really looking for something I would be able to use on myself to patch up a GSW until I can get proper medical attention.

    -Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey View Post
    This would be a kit for SHTF situation on my vest or go-bag. I carry a pretty decent first aid kit(bandaids, asprin, a few rolls of gauze and tape, shears, etc.) in each of my vehicles for minor stuff. I'm really looking for something I would be able to use on myself to patch up a GSW until I can get proper medical attention.

    -Mike
    Then Rob's suggested kit sounds like a very good one.

    And make sure there are at least one, preferably two working cell phones there with you.

    If you get a chance, you might think of something like the military "nine-line card" for calling in the medical emergency. You want to be able to tell them who, what, where, how many, etc.

    If you are in a more remote location, a set of GPS coordinates of your range could literally be a lifesaver. A medevac bird can fly directly to you, and save a lot of time.

    Good luck.

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    Oh, and I would be sorely tempted to add shears and a light to that IFAK.

    And a blue filter on a white light is often handy for spotting blood in low-light conditions.

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