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Thread: Can we talk about sequence of operations?

  1. #21
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    My academy gave us the following procedure for treating trauma-

    1. Call EMS

    2. Direct Traffic











    Like others have said the proximity of well equipped and educated care has something to do with preliminary treatment. That is how I understand it anyway. Learning here.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZDL View Post
    My academy gave us the following procedure for treating trauma-

    1. Call EMS

    2. Direct Traffic
    Awesome !!! You beat my post hands down!!!
    Guard against the impostures of pretended patriotism.

    George Washington, Farewell Address, September 19, 1796

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Solo
    They all work about equally well, the low temp QuickClot doesnt scorch wounds anymore, and they are all easy to remove afterward
    Scorch? I knew it got warm but I didn't know it burnt you.
    Last edited by Mikey; 03-04-09 at 23:30.

  4. #24
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    The original QuickClot powder compound got really warm. to the point that you didnt want to hold onto it if it had blood mixed with it. After flushing it out of a wound, the wound edges were very irritated, and discolored. "Scorched" may not be a technical term, but it's what the wound looked like to me.

    The new formula doesn't have that problem. I've used it on live tissue, pulled it out after bleeding was controlled and all the wound edges were 'normal' looking.

    The old hi temp formula is still being produced, but, to my knowledge isnt being sold on the .civ market and even in our limited market, I'm not seeing it.

    Additionally, the bean bags solved some of the other issues with it blowing around, and the CombatGuaze seems to offer a lot of promise.

    i've had good success with Celox also.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey View Post
    Scorch? Like it heats up an Cauterizes the wound?
    Heat is a bad thing. It was never intended to cauterize. This is the Gen 1 QC junk. Also, if the stuff got in your eyes, it hurt like hell.

    One of our guys got hit by an IED a few years back. A piece of metal came thru the vehicle and hit him in the head, removing part of the skull. His ignorant team mates poured Gen 1 QC into the wound. His brain got fried. He lived, but he lost more of his brain due to the QC than the wound.

    We use the Hemcons and the new QC pads now.

    The Celox stuff is very good, especially the one in a syringe that you shoot into the wound (celox-A).

    Rumor has it that instant mash potato powder can be used in emergencies, but I never verified that story.

    I hope some combat medics will chime in and give us the latest poop. I am just an end user...
    ParadigmSRP.com

  6. #26
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    Cool, thanks for the explanantion.

    The bag/sponge QC is the way to go, huh?

  7. #27
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    The Quick Clot ACS sponges are gtg. The latest reccomendation from TCCC is for CombatGuaze. Essentially the same compound, just impregnated in a roll of guaze, made by the same company. ZMedica. It gives you a few more options, but I wouldn't feel under equipped with any of the major hemostatics, the biggest factor, all things considered is using the product appropriately.
    Last edited by Doc Solo; 03-05-09 at 00:03. Reason: I can't spell.

  8. #28
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    Lets not forget that WoundStat has problems now, and is being pulled from the troops...

    SUBJ: T0B-1218-002
    NEW SOLDIER HEMOSTATIC DRESSINS / WOUNDSTAT / MEDICAL INFORMATION


    REFERENCE: ALARACT 239/2008, NEW SOLDIER HEMOSTATIC DRESSINGS

    1. THIS FRAGO DIRECTS TEMPORARY CESSATION OF USE OF WOUNDSTAT™ (WS) BY 68W
    COMBAT MEDICS AND ALL OTHER PROVIDERS DUE TO NEWLY IDENTIFIED SAFETY CONCERNS
    ABOUT THIS PRODUCT, PENDING FURTHER EVALUATION.

    2. WOUNDSTAT™ WILL BE TURNED IN TO THE MEDICAL SUPPLY SYSTEM IMMEDIATELY.
    UNIT SUPPLY PERSONNEL WILL TURN -IN WOUNDSTAT™ TO THEIR SUPPORTING MEDICAL
    SUPPLY SUPPORT ACTIVITY (SSA). THE ARMY MEDICAL SSA WILL REVIEW TRANSACTION
    REGISTERS AND COMPLETE 100% CONTACT WITH UNITS ISSUED WS TO ENSURE TURN-IN
    OF PRODUCT. ARCENT WILL SUBMIT THE TOTAL NUMBER OF WS ISSUED AND COLLECTED
    TO OTSG. THE ARMY MEDICAL SSA WILL HOLD WS UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE OR UNTIL DISPOSITION
    INSTRUCTIONS ARE RECEIVED FROM OTSG.

    3. DATA FROM THE US ARMY INSTITUTE OF SURGICAL RESEARCH (USAISR) SHOW THAT
    WS IS ASSOCIATED WITH A HIGH INCIDENCE OF BLOOD VESSEL THROMBOSIS AND DAMAGE
    TO THE VESSEL WALL. COMBAT GAUZE AND PLAIN KERLIX WERE NOT ASSOCIATED WITH
    SIMILAR FINDINGS. USE OF COMBAT GAUZE IS SAFE, ACCORDING TO CURRENT STUDIES,
    AND DISTRIBUTION AND USE SHOULD CONTINUE.
    ParadigmSRP.com

  9. #29
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    In my experience you can basically tell by just looking at an extremity wound, whether or not a specific hemorrhage site will be able to be controlled with gauze and direct pressure. If I have any question at all that I might have difficulty controlling a bleed or I need to expedite pt movement, I will use a tourniquet. When things have calmed down, I have more hands, or the pt has been removed to a safe area for further treatment, I can begin worrying about bandaging a site and removing the tourniquet. Tourniquets do not destroy tissue, and I can fix almost anything thats going to kill you right now. The one thing I cant do (with todays technology) is give you whole blood or some other compound that carries oxygen to your vital organs. My 1ST priority is stopping a life threatening bleed as absolutely quickly as possible so that all of that other ABCD stuff can stay relevant. You will begin to see tourniquets become more and more accepted as a front line treatment for hemorrhage control in civilian medical care in the coming years as all the old myths about them disappear.

  10. #30
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    Keep the great information coming!
    Last edited by calebgriffin31; 03-05-09 at 17:12.

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