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Thread: 2009 Florida Hurricane Season

  1. #11
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    I too normally have a well stocked pantry with can goods, cases of water and other non perishables. With several propane tanks, a gas grill and a freezer full of stuff to BBQ, a pool full of water to flush the comode, I think I'm GTG for several weeks in a hunker down situation. I still have to get that generator though.

    Back when Katrina and 4 other big named hurricanes hit, Lakeland was the Bullseye for 4 that crossed the state. One of them predicted to hit Tampa/St. Pete, made a left and hit Cape Coral, going inland...where? Lakeland. Same with Orlando, hit by 3 of the 5. Regardless of where you live, a well built concrete block house with a metal roof would serve you well. Last time I was in Key West, almost every house had one.
    For God and the soldier we adore, In time of danger, not before! The danger passed, and all things righted, God is forgotten and the soldier slighted." - Rudyard Kipling

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rharris2163 View Post
    I too normally have a well stocked pantry with can goods, cases of water and other non perishables. With several propane tanks, a gas grill and a freezer full of stuff to BBQ, a pool full of water to flush the comode, I think I'm GTG for several weeks in a hunker down situation. I still have to get that generator though.

    Back when Katrina and 4 other big named hurricanes hit, Lakeland was the Bullseye for 4 that crossed the state. One of them predicted to hit Tampa/St. Pete, made a left and hit Cape Coral, going inland...where? Lakeland. Same with Orlando, hit by 3 of the 5. Regardless of where you live, a well built concrete block house with a metal roof would serve you well. Last time I was in Key West, almost every house had one.
    Those metal roofs are nice those stand up to hurricanes very well .

  3. #13
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    most roofs will hold up if they're fastened right.. obviously some are simply imposible to fasten right. metal shingles are NO GO, as is 3-tab. standing seam metal is better than those, but still not traditionally known for high wind ratings. its really light, and once high winds pick up an edge, the whole thing goes. same goes for any product that's installed in large sections. if you double screw standing-seam metal (inside flange pan-head, outside with washer screws), it's not going anywhere, but you then decrease it's serviceable life by about 50%.. those neoprene washer screws last maybe 20 years, whereas the roofing itself is rated for 50+, and you're paying for the 50+.

    if i lived in a hurricane area and had a pitched roof, i'd go with cedar shingles if i could find CCA old-growth ($500+ per square these days), toe-nailed with 2" staples and cap on the rake-edges, or a tri-lam composition shingle like Landmark TL or Presidential TL, and do 6 nails per. otherwise, coated concrete on a flat roof will never blow off.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkb0000 View Post
    most roofs will hold up if they're fastened right.. obviously some are simply imposible to fasten right. metal shingles are NO GO, as is 3-tab. standing seam metal is better than those, but still not traditionally known for high wind ratings. its really light, and once high winds pick up an edge, the whole thing goes. same goes for any product that's installed in large sections. if you double screw standing-seam metal (inside flange pan-head, outside with washer screws), it's not going anywhere, but you then decrease it's serviceable life by about 50%.. those neoprene washer screws last maybe 20 years, whereas the roofing itself is rated for 50+, and you're paying for the 50+.

    if i lived in a hurricane area and had a pitched roof, i'd go with cedar shingles if i could find CCA old-growth ($500+ per square these days), toe-nailed with 2" staples and cap on the rake-edges, or a tri-lam composition shingle like Landmark TL or Presidential TL, and do 6 nails per. otherwise, coated concrete on a flat roof will never blow off.
    Sounds like you are an accomplished carpenter there is still a lot of work that needs to be done on the gulf coast . Its been 2 years since my last visit. One suggestion try to find an apartment to rent living out of a motorhome for 6 months SUCKS.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkb0000 View Post
    most roofs will hold up if they're fastened right.. obviously some are simply imposible to fasten right. metal shingles are NO GO, as is 3-tab. standing seam metal is better than those, but still not traditionally known for high wind ratings. its really light, and once high winds pick up an edge, the whole thing goes. same goes for any product that's installed in large sections. if you double screw standing-seam metal (inside flange pan-head, outside with washer screws), it's not going anywhere, but you then decrease it's serviceable life by about 50%.. those neoprene washer screws last maybe 20 years, whereas the roofing itself is rated for 50+, and you're paying for the 50+.

    if i lived in a hurricane area and had a pitched roof, i'd go with cedar shingles if i could find CCA old-growth ($500+ per square these days), toe-nailed with 2" staples and cap on the rake-edges, or a tri-lam composition shingle like Landmark TL or Presidential TL, and do 6 nails per. otherwise, coated concrete on a flat roof will never blow off.

    Interesting discussion about Roofing. I had installed a new roof in Jan. 2008. We used Timberline Ultra Lifetime Archectural shingles that are rated to 110 MPH when 6 nails per shingle are used and Timbertex Ridge Cap, 30 Lb paper and snow and ice shield around the roof perimeter and all skylights was also installed.

    The Lifetime warranty is transferable for 10 years to a new owner. If you don't want a metal roof, this is about the best that you are going to do. These shingles weight about double what a typical 30 year shingle weighs. The Cobra Vent at the top will also help insure that the roof breathes well. We are in the flood plane in a hurricane area, on an island.

    Stay dry.
    Last edited by Cold Zero; 05-23-09 at 20:53.
    Cold Zero

  6. #16
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    Monolithic Dome Home

    This is not what I have but this is what I shall build.

  7. #17
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    these things are strong, but uglier then sin! i think id rather just build a block house, with a good metal roof. also, surround the house with trees, keep it far enough away that if the tallest tree falls, it wont damage the house, but i would think that this would still allow the trees to break up a lot of the wind and what not.

    either that or build one of those homes into the side of a hill. thatd work great!

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