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Thread: Patrol First Aid Kit

  1. #1
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    Patrol First Aid Kit

    Hello All my first post in this section, would like to ask a question on what basic gear should be stored in a Patrol First Aid Kit. I work for the Philadelphia Police Department which does not supply any sort of First Aid Kit so I have to build one from items that can be procured from a Hospital ER or Medical supply on my own dollar. My training comes from the ARC First Responder Training for Law Enforcement so I have a full understanding of the basics of care to a injured person. Now as most of the posters here will know Philadelphia is one "Shoot-em up town" and we have lost several officers in the past two years and had several others shot who survived. My goal is to assist a badly injured officer in any way possible if by gun fire or other means of injury as Trauma hospitals at best are 10 to 15 minutes away. We do have fire medic units but their services are pushed to the breaking point by equipment and personal cut backs so response time can be from 10 to 50 minutes in coming. Most times with gunshot wounds we grab and run for the nearest hospital and apply what ever aid we can while en-route. So heres the question, if you had to build a kit to cover the listed Training/Distance to treatment/Supply source what sort of items would you guys and gals have on hand?

    Thank you!
    Phila PD

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    There were a couple of good threads a while back, that might give you a good starting point.

    "Trauma kit for GSW only, contents change?"

    https://www.m4carbine.net/showthread.php?t=32659

    And this one was pretty good as well:

    "Components of a decent trauma kit?"

    https://www.m4carbine.net/showthread.php?t=27217

    There are a couple of current and former medical types frequenting this board, that will likely wander along soon. I am sure they can give good advice. A few are tactical medical folks in police and military units. They could likely provide operational input.

    Have you had an opportunity to chat with some of your fire/EMS folks there in Philly? Most of the smoke-eaters are smart enough to know it pays to have friends with guns around, and usually help out at officer with a need such as yours. Or at least, I certainly used to do so.

    Good luck, and stay safe!

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    do check out the GSW thread, I think we came pretty close to the best solution for the first responder to have.

    I like seeing officers take initiative and prepare to render aid until EMS shows up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FMF_Doc View Post
    do check out the GSW thread, I think we came pretty close to the best solution for the first responder to have.

    I like seeing officers take initiative and prepare to render aid until EMS shows up.
    Well Said.
    Ed Fernley
    Pathfinder Operations
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    "I'M THE ONE WHO BARKED AT THUNDER, ROARED AT LIGHTENING, MADE DEATH WONDER."

    AND

    “Wherever I go, everyone is a little bit safer because I am there.
    Wherever I am, anyone in need has a friend.
    Whenever I return home, everyone is happy I am there.
    It's a better life!”- Robert L. Humphrey “Warriors Creed"


    "John has a long mustache."

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    Is using multiple 4x4's good enough with direct pressure for most G/S wounds? Talking to one of are long time Fire Medic Units thats all they say they use but then again thats all they are supplied with. One of my OIS had a responding officer shot in the left lower cheek, jaw, neck area with #4 shotgun pellets and from what I had seen 4x4's would not cover the area. One officer KILOD last year was shot with a 7.62x39mm and the bleeding was massive from reports given. What kind of dressing can handle these types of wounds? Most times its multiple hits with exits so how do you plug the holes just to get them to the E/R alive.
    Last edited by PA PATRIOT; 07-09-09 at 00:02.

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    I know you aren't going to like my answer but.....tampons and maxi pads. tampons are good for entry wounds and the pad can be folded and stuffed in the exit wound. Then wrap with tape or bandage.

    I'm not a medic, but this was one of the tricks my 18Ds like to teach.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phila PD View Post
    Is using multiple 4x4's good enough with direct pressure for most G/S wounds? Talking to one of are long time Fire Medic Units thats all they say they use but then again thats all they are supplied with. One of my OIS had a responding officer shot in the left lower cheek, jaw, neck area with #4 shotgun pellets and from what I had seen 4x4's would not cover the area. One officer KILOD last year was shot with a 7.62x39mm and the bleeding was massive from reports given. What kind of dressing can handle these types of wounds? Most times its multiple hits with exits so how do you plug the holes just to get them to the E/R alive.
    Hey I've stopped a lot of bleeding in this manner over the years as well and there is nothing wrong with sticking to the old tried and true approaches.

    Especially where the more dynamic stuff may not be available.

    Using an Israeli Bandage and hemostatic agents is just whats new and now. It's kinda like using dial up for internet. It works but not as quick and in some cases you gotta go new school if you want better results faster.

    Oh and in my kit along with the new school stuff is standard old gauze padsas well.

    One thing I HIGHLY recommend regardless is to have a roll of curlex (rolled gauze). It's great for packing a wound that is deep and or wide.

    And if you pack it into a wound it facilitates better results from direct pressure.
    Ed Fernley
    Pathfinder Operations
    Semper Primus!


    "I'M THE ONE WHO BARKED AT THUNDER, ROARED AT LIGHTENING, MADE DEATH WONDER."

    AND

    “Wherever I go, everyone is a little bit safer because I am there.
    Wherever I am, anyone in need has a friend.
    Whenever I return home, everyone is happy I am there.
    It's a better life!”- Robert L. Humphrey “Warriors Creed"


    "John has a long mustache."

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    I've sealed wounds with 4x4s and duct tape, you use what will get the job done.

    Direct pressure, followed by pressure bandage is the way to go, now if you have things like the clotting agents handy that would be the time to use them.

    Large wounds just take up more supplies, that's one reason I like duct tape. It, kerlex and lot's of 4x4's have helped me save more than one life.

    Things get really interesting when you have multiple patients with multiple wounds, including yourself.
    Last edited by FMF_Doc; 07-11-09 at 05:34.

  9. #9
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    How about 5"x9" Kendall Tendersorb Wet Pruf Abdominal pads is this a good choice to replace basic Gauze 4x4's?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phila PD View Post
    Is using multiple 4x4's good enough with direct pressure for most G/S wounds? Talking to one of are long time Fire Medic Units thats all they say they use but then again thats all they are supplied with. One of my OIS had a responding officer shot in the left lower cheek, jaw, neck area with #4 shotgun pellets and from what I had seen 4x4's would not cover the area. One officer KILOD last year was shot with a 7.62x39mm and the bleeding was massive from reports given. What kind of dressing can handle these types of wounds? Most times its multiple hits with exits so how do you plug the holes just to get them to the E/R alive.
    Unfortunatly the reality is that if you are hit COM with a high power projectile like the 7.62x39 you will have a very high mortality rate. Best dressing? Your hand and some gauze. Are there better solutions out there? Yes, however if you are struck with a rifle round you will typically need a tourniquet if its an extremity wound or a gloved hand if its a torso wound (likely followed by a body bag realistically.

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