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Thread: Patrol First Aid Kit

  1. #11
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    TacMed, we train to never give up. Please don't program guys to think they are 10-7 if they are hit. Attitude is a huge part of survival. Realistic or not, you never give up hope if you are hit or if you are lending aid.

  2. #12
    Join Date
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    The one thing I would never ever do is give up on wounded brother unless it is so obvious (Major Brain destruction) that there was no chance for survival. Barring that any other hit or hits to the body would be direct pressure with multiple 5x9's and extremities packed out with roll gauze and elastic bandages with the use of temp Tourniquets if major bleeding is seen. Since I'm only trained as a Police First responder and BLS I can only do the best I can while en-route to the hospital.

    The above is why I made my first post in this section so to construct a basic kit with the gear that will make the most difference when needed. Once I figure out the gear my local E/R will help supply it.

  3. #13
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    Here is the list I would pursue:

    10pr - Large Non-Latex Gloves
    1 - SOF-T Tourniquet
    1 - "Izzy" dressing FCP-05 6" with Slider
    2 - 4" rolls of Kerlix
    4"- 6" Thick stack of 4"x4" Non-Sterile Gauze
    2 - Triangular bandages
    1 - Trauma Dressing (Large like 20"x15" Gauze pad)

    If trained: In separate bag in Trunk -
    BVM
    OPA/NPA - Adult Sized

    Place the supplies in a ziplock baggy, roll out the air, and keep in the door sill between door/b-post and seat. Accessible by feel from prone or supine possition on ground. Preferably a complete set on both sides of the vehicle.

    Shipped from Chinook Med - $46.84




    apache64 - I am aware of how LEO's are trained. There is a difference in never giving up and recognizing the extent of someones injuries. As professionals we should understand the dangers and implications of what we do. If you are hit by a projectile of enough power to penetrate your vest it will very likey cause irreperable damage. Hopefully your training, warrior mindset, and adrenaline will allow you to succesfully return fire and suppress the threat before you become incapacitated. If you are my patient you and your family and your borthers and sisters can be comforted by the knowledge that you will recieve literally the best pre-hospital medical care in the United States bar none. I will not give up on you. I will take you to a medical facility with great trauma surgeons and ER Staff. They will not give up on you. Regardless, despite everyone fighting for your life and hoping and praying that by some miracle they will be able save you, there is a good possibility that you will not make it. That is not deffeatist, or inappropriate. It is the truth. I hope I never have to lose another friend but it will happen to some of us. Being honest and open with someone is different than programing someone to give up, and if you are someone willing to give up you are not working with me.

    The answer to the OP's question is that after pulling your buddy into the back of his patrol car you dont take the time to put an occlusive dressing on his chest wound. You place a gloved hand over it and seal it during the trip to the hospital. There are other solutions such as the Ascherman or Bolin chest seal's however few officers in this country will have one of those available.

    "Is using multiple 4x4's good enough with direct pressure for most G/S wounds?"
    Yes. However if it looks bad and you can place a tourniquet above it . . . do so. If you think it is so bad that you cant wait for the ambulance to arrive? Then its bad enough for a tourniquet. COM wounds will need packing and direct pressure.

    "One of my OIS had a responding officer shot in the left lower cheek, jaw, neck area with #4 shotgun pellets and from what I had seen 4x4's would not cover the area." Typically you will not see life treatening hemhoraging from here other than the neck which you will attempt to control with gauze and direct pressure.

    "How about 5"x9" Kendall Tendersorb Wet Pruf Abdominal pads is this a good choice to replace basic Gauze 4x4's?" Sure, only harder to obtain and a handful of 4x4's typically works fine.

    I wish more officers were prepared for caring for themselves or another downed officer.

    Does that clear everything up for eveyone?
    Last edited by NinjaMedic; 07-18-09 at 16:49.

  4. #14
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    10-4 guys. Thanks for the info. I, too am looking for the gear and training. Philly, we lost 3 in one attack on our side of the state. Tacmed, I appreciate your training and experience. I have had several co-workers seriously wounded. 5 headwounds with center-fire. Three made it and two did not. I was just reminding everyone to don't give up hope. Amazing what hits the badguys live through. We can do it, too! Our commrades in EMS are amazing and make a huge difference.

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