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Thread: Bug Out Vehicle Tactics

  1. #1
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    Bug Out Vehicle Tactics

    So the "Long Rifle" thread has a lot of interesting points made about the use of vehicles to bug out. Some of us live in urban, suburban environments where a forced evac (whether by government or situation) will be non-ideal but a possibility. I thought I would start a thread for the use of a vehicle, the use of highways, ext. What are some tactics that can be employed to insure that you get you and yours away while maintaining mobility?

    I will leave it open to others. I have some thoughts but I am curious about what others have to say.

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    Good topic. I don't think it's limited to any particular AO or situation, the vehicle is going to be our primary form of travel.

    Obviously the capabilities of the vehicle should be discussed, but I'm pretty sure most of us are going to go out and buy a dedicated vehicle. Keeping the vehicle in good working order, well fueled, and having some bare essential extras for the vehicle AND the passengers is probably a good idea.

    More to follow.....
    Josh
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    www.GreyGroupTraining.com

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    Best plan for a government evac is to leave as soon as you can. Mostly because the longer you wait the more broken down/out of gas vehicles you will have to deal with. In the SE we have planned evac routes, which always end up in a cluster very quickly, which is why all the major highways turn into one way routes(either north or west).

    If taking non-highway routes stay as far away from major highways crossings, ends up being worse than being on the highway.

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    I would say, logistically, that a good bug out vehicle must fulfill each of these specs:

    V8 Gas or Diesel- provides ample power and torque. Ables such a vehicle to carry heavier loads and/or traverse steep terrain if necessary.

    Four Wheel Drive- again, terrain dependent. If off-road driving is necessary, 4wd is a must.
    Tires- All terrains at the least, if not off-road tires such as BFGoodrich A/Ts. These provide ample on-road performance while at the same time offering superior off-road and cross-country capabilities.
    Passenger and Cargo Space- gotta carry your s***. Enough said.
    Fuel Capacity- as large as possible. Given the rest of these suggestions, I forsee fuel being the limiting factor of any bug out vehicle. Carry as much fuel as you can, and you increase the distance you can traverse....your "legs" get longer for every additional gallon of fuel, whether that be gas or diesel, that you can carry.
    Maintenance- necessary for any good vehicle. What good would it do you to have the best 4x4 on the road if it has bad spark plugs and the alternator craps out after 100 miles? Onboard tools should be carried as well. These should include basic hand tools whihc would enable any technically able individual to fix minor problems with the vehicle. Common spare parts should be available, either carried onboard or to be acquired.
    Lighting- simple headlights often won't cut it. The addition of fog or driving lights greatly increases your off-road capability at night and can increase safety.

    A grille guard wouldn't be a bad idea either.

    Thats pretty much what I can think of off the top of my head. Given the above parameters, a vehicle such as that would be able to traverse highways with ease and have the "legs" to get you and the occupants out of harms way on a single tank of fuel; while at the same time off-road driving could be accomplished if necessary.
    A man with a gun is a citizen. A man without a gun is a subject.

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    Were I single, and worried about something like a hurricane evac, I'd seriously think about a motorcycle. Pretty easy to cut through lanes of stopped traffic if need be. A little low on cargo space though.

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    I had a Jeep Wrangler & joined a local off-road club to learn how to really go off-road. This vehicle would get me thru everything but I sold it in favor of a more "civil", more powerful & lo-pro VW Touareg. The skills I acquired with the Jeep apply to every 4x4 or all-wheel drive vehicle. I am confident that the Touareg will get me home if I don't have to go thru 2 foot of water, climb 1 foot rocks or go thru 2 or 3 foot deep mud. I did all that with the jeep but settled for more luxury and power while still having mild off-road capability...if you can do it with a modern Land Rover, you can do it with a Touareg!
    A jeep loves to go off-road but once you trick it out to make it more capable your on-road ride quality will suffer. I did some mild trails with the Touareg and it does well enough in all possible scenarios I can Imagine ever being in.

    here's a pic of my ex jeep;

  7. #7
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    My bug out vehicle of choice? The out soon, Ford F-150 Raptor. This thing is sweet with a capital "S"!


    http://www.autoweek.com/article/20081104/FREE/811049997

    http://www.dieselstation.com/cars/fo...tor-a1140.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizensoldier16 View Post
    I would say, logistically, that a good bug out vehicle must fulfill each of these specs:

    V8 Gas or Diesel- provides ample power and torque. Ables such a vehicle to carry heavier loads and/or traverse steep terrain if necessary.

    Four Wheel Drive- again, terrain dependent. If off-road driving is necessary, 4wd is a must.
    Tires- All terrains at the least, if not off-road tires such as BFGoodrich A/Ts. These provide ample on-road performance while at the same time offering superior off-road and cross-country capabilities.
    Passenger and Cargo Space- gotta carry your s***. Enough said.
    Fuel Capacity- as large as possible. Given the rest of these suggestions, I forsee fuel being the limiting factor of any bug out vehicle. Carry as much fuel as you can, and you increase the distance you can traverse....your "legs" get longer for every additional gallon of fuel, whether that be gas or diesel, that you can carry.
    Maintenance- necessary for any good vehicle. What good would it do you to have the best 4x4 on the road if it has bad spark plugs and the alternator craps out after 100 miles? Onboard tools should be carried as well. These should include basic hand tools whihc would enable any technically able individual to fix minor problems with the vehicle. Common spare parts should be available, either carried onboard or to be acquired.
    Lighting- simple headlights often won't cut it. The addition of fog or driving lights greatly increases your off-road capability at night and can increase safety.

    A grille guard wouldn't be a bad idea either.

    Thats pretty much what I can think of off the top of my head. Given the above parameters, a vehicle such as that would be able to traverse highways with ease and have the "legs" to get you and the occupants out of harms way on a single tank of fuel; while at the same time off-road driving could be accomplished if necessary.
    4wd Is very nice but it isn't a must have Let me duck out the way the muds flying literally I live in AL and if you have ever heard the term Georgia red clay its also Alabama red clay. You can go many places and go through all most as much mud holes in a 2wd with [REAL MUD TIRES and a limited slip is good to have also] Most important is to have real MUD TIRES not A/T tires. I have seen many times were a 2WD with TRUE MUD TIRES go in places that was thought only 4WD could go. It is trickery to do it usually you are spinning like mad and shooting rooster tails but it can be done of course it would be wise you try it before the SHTF situation show that you do have some practical experience in doing it .
    True mud tire's eject the mud from the tread [self cleaning if you think of it] where as A/T are no were near as good. 4 WD nice but it can be done with a 2WD with the Correct tires and some experience
    LET THE MUD SLINGING COMMENCE

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    I've seen these threads often turn into "a burly 4x4 with gas cans and luggage racks" kind of mentality. The reality is people are going to bug out in what they drive every day. Can we take the type of vehicle into consideration?? Sure. I'd personally like to discuss how to maintain ANY vehicle and what to take with us in an emergency. I'd also like to discuss movement and travel considerations during multiple types of scenarios.

    I saw somewhere, could have been here, where someone had a pallet of gear and goods in his garage and when it was time to go he just lifted the pallet into his truck or trailer and off he went. I thought that was an excellent idea. You can manage and maintain the "pallet" and still have use of your vehicle. I think this mentality has a ton of merit. I dont think it has to be a pallet. It could just be a tough box or a duffle, etc. Obviously the space you have and the number of people you must account for play a role in the decision making. What I like about this concept is you can have some bare essentials for on the road emergencies (first line and second line mentality) and then have your "third line" pre-staged and ready to go. I'm all about scalability, whether it's your personal survival gear, fighting gear, or vehicle gear.

    Thoughts?
    Last edited by zushwa; 09-04-09 at 00:46. Reason: punctuation
    Josh
    (w)910.323.4739
    www.GreyGroupTraining.com

  10. #10
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    One might also consider the color of BOV, to blend into ones climate/environment where one lives. Being low key could be a real asset. Who knows what/who may come running in ones direction if spotted.

    Know your geographic area also, get out and snoop around.

    I try to not let my tank get under a 1/2 tank always. If I see a storm brewing of any kind I head to a station and top off the tank any way.

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