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Thread: Lessons Learned In Combat

  1. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetreatHell View Post
    Thanks man, and thanks for your service as well. Yeah after speaking with a few current Marines over the past year I'm VERY happy with the direction things have gone over he years in the Corps, however it's happened far too slow and still have a ton to learn. I still see plenty of vids of Marines in A'stan doing some of the same stupid ass shit that got me wounded. If our enemy had decent optics we'd sustain WAY more small arms fire casualties.
    I agree 100%, we've gotten complacent over the past 12 years because we're not fighting an enemy that is equipped to the same standard we are. If they had ACOGs and rifles that were made in this century we'd be in for a bad day.

    The main problem today is that we don't shoot nearly enough. When we're in the rear we might shoot two or three times a year, and then its just a basic combat shoot where the most demanding thing you have to do is a box drill. I think we should train to the level of SOF, at least as far as shooting goes i.e. lateral movement, reloading on the move, timed drills etc. But I'm just a lowly Lcpl, what do I know
    0311
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  2. #182
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    Inspiring RetreatHell. Thank you for sharing. Never quit.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  3. #183
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    Just want to say thank you first and foremost for your service and also for writing and sharing this. I'm new to this forum but I've been a subscriber to your youtube channel for some time now. Keep up the good work Paul.

  4. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dist. Expert 26 View Post
    I agree 100%, we've gotten complacent over the past 12 years because we're not fighting an enemy that is equipped to the same standard we are. If they had ACOGs and rifles that were made in this century we'd be in for a bad day.

    The main problem today is that we don't shoot nearly enough. When we're in the rear we might shoot two or three times a year, and then its just a basic combat shoot where the most demanding thing you have to do is a box drill. I think we should train to the level of SOF, at least as far as shooting goes i.e. lateral movement, reloading on the move, timed drills etc. But I'm just a lowly Lcpl, what do I know
    Dude WTF unit are you in? That's ridiculous. After the common skills portions of each work up, which was about six weeks at most of land nav, mounted ops, and humps, we never stopped shooting. We got sick of it, and would stare at the pallets of ammo we had to burn through before we could hike back home. If you're being serious, your unit leadership ****ed you. Hard.

    Also, I don't know who you were fighting on your rodeos, but there has been no shortage of good equipment finding it's way into our opponents hands.
    Team Medic, Task Force Zangaro
    "The Cat's Originals"

  5. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by SOW_0331 View Post
    Dude WTF unit are you in? That's ridiculous. After the common skills portions of each work up, which was about six weeks at most of land nav, mounted ops, and humps, we never stopped shooting. We got sick of it, and would stare at the pallets of ammo we had to burn through before we could hike back home. If you're being serious, your unit leadership ****ed you. Hard.

    Also, I don't know who you were fighting on your rodeos, but there has been no shortage of good equipment finding it's way into our opponents hands.
    Not to double necro post but, this.

    After re-deployment and re-integration, training would slowly pick up again. We would go to the range at a bare minimum at least once a week at the start, then about 2-3 times a week. Usually consisting of re-zeroing, reflexive fire, shooting from various barriers/cover etc. Once training started to pick up we would have company, battalion, and brigade size FTX's, PLT and CO level land-nav courses, battalion and brigade level STX lanes, machine/crew-serve gun ranges, MOUT ranges...as well as gunneries; Bradley for the mounted and Humvee for the dismounted. All that plus continuous training on PLT level dismounted and mounted battle drills, battle marches and shoots, constant glass house training, and a random occasional assortment of EST training. Then after all that, throw in a rotation of JRTC.

    To the OP, great article.
    Last edited by Endur; 04-16-14 at 03:12.

  6. #186
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    Thank you for sharing your experience. I'm sure that it will benefit whomever find themselves in a similar position. Looks like you're in the fight with vigor!

  7. #187
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    Awesome article, OP. If, for your own curiosity, you want to know how far the training has increased since your time, let me know. As of 2013, it had improved ten-fold even since '06.

  8. #188
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    This is a great thread and I'd like to add my two cents. Formerly I was a platoon commander in a weapons platoon in the Marine Corps. They were all very good Marines and they had just come back from an Afghanistan deployment, as had I, albeit with a different unit. Over the months I started to notice some strange tactics that weren't really standard, and when I'd ask my Marines about them they'd just say that it worked in Afghanistan. Now this is a very dangerous line of logic.

    I've seen loads of stupidity in country and dudes didn't get killed, but that was sheer luck. So I encourage everyone to think critically about something they are doing. Just because it worked once for someone doesn't mean it is right for you or your current situation. A perfect example of this is stacking on doorways. This works great in my current job as a police officer, but will get you killed in a war zone. You generally have a secure perimeter here in the US, but in country you don't and people will always shoot big groups of enemy.

    So I always advise to listen to those with experience and training, but think critically if it really is right for you because ultimately you are responsible for your own actions.
    Crossfit Level 1 Coach, Former Marine Officer, Current Police Officer

    Owner of Tier Three Tactical

  9. #189
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    The one thing that I learned in combat is that a wounded man can kill you.
    "Its The Skill Set Of The Person Behind The Weapon"

  10. #190
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    Thank you for sharing your story brother.

    I hope, and believe, you've saved a good number of lives if only a few readers heed your advice!

    Semper Fidelis!

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