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Thread: "Jungle" boots

  1. #21
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    Full disclosure: i work the boot dept at Cabela's.

    Merrell Moabs are great lightweight hiking boots, but the tread doesn't shed soil, the Vibram soles on 'em are designed to be grippy. For the OP's needs, I still standby my recommendation for trying on an Upland style boot. The kangaroo ones are really lightweight.

  2. #22
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    I have the wolveriene caribou 9" in digital storm. 800 gram thinsulate and goretex. Completely waterproof in my experience and great positive traction.
    http://www.onlineshoes.com/mens-wolv...9%27%27&offer=
    Last edited by lethal dose; 02-26-10 at 01:27.
    Acta Non Verba

  3. #23
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    Rob why no Gortex?

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ga Shooter View Post
    Rob why no Gortex?
    No use for it. It's not cold here, and I'm not stepping in puddles, just mud.

  5. #25
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    I have never had any boots with Gortex. Does it make them hotter? I live near you and don't want heat but I do get wet feet and would like them to stay dry. Thanks for the help.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ga Shooter View Post
    I have never had any boots with Gortex. Does it make them hotter? I live near you and don't want heat but I do get wet feet and would like them to stay dry. Thanks for the help.
    Negative.

    Gore-Tex materials are typically based on thermo-mechanically expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and other fluoropolymer products. They are used in a wide variety of applications such as high performance fabrics, medical implants, filter media, insulation for wires and cables, gaskets, and sealants. However, Gore-Tex is best known for its use in protective, yet breathable, rain wear.

    The simplest sort of rain wear is a two layer sandwich. The outer layer is typically nylon or polyester and provides strength. The inner one is polyurethane (abbreviated: PU), and provides water resistance, at the cost of breathability.

    Early Gore-Tex fabric replaced the inner layer of PU with a thin, porous fluoropolymer membrane (Teflon) coating that is bonded to a fabric. This membrane had about 9 billion pores per square inch (around 1.4 billion pores per square centimeter). Each pore is approximately 1/20,000 the size of a water droplet, making it impenetrable to liquid water while still allowing the smaller sized water vapour molecules to pass through.


    However it was found that when used in clothing the exposed Teflon membrane layer was easily damaged, as well as being compromised by exposure to the wearer's own perspiration. As a result a third, monolithic PU layer was added, denoted in the schematic (see right)as the inner of the "protection" layers. Finally either a loose fabric shell layer, or a bonded coating (typically a grid fabric, or occasionally a carbon layer as in Gore-Tex Paclite Shell) is added to the garment to protect the membrane sandwich. This final design has been criticized as offering greatly reduced performance and more marketing benefits than performance ones.[4]

    More recent fabrics such as eVent and Epic avoid the need for this inner PU coating[5] and have been shown to have higher breathability as a result, while still being rainproof


    HTH...

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by HOPLOETHOS View Post
    Negative.

    Gore-Tex materials are typically based on thermo-mechanically expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and other fluoropolymer products. They are used in a wide variety of applications such as high performance fabrics, medical implants, filter media, insulation for wires and cables, gaskets, and sealants. However, Gore-Tex is best known for its use in protective, yet breathable, rain wear.

    The simplest sort of rain wear is a two layer sandwich. The outer layer is typically nylon or polyester and provides strength. The inner one is polyurethane (abbreviated: PU), and provides water resistance, at the cost of breathability.

    Early Gore-Tex fabric replaced the inner layer of PU with a thin, porous fluoropolymer membrane (Teflon) coating that is bonded to a fabric. This membrane had about 9 billion pores per square inch (around 1.4 billion pores per square centimeter). Each pore is approximately 1/20,000 the size of a water droplet, making it impenetrable to liquid water while still allowing the smaller sized water vapour molecules to pass through.


    However it was found that when used in clothing the exposed Teflon membrane layer was easily damaged, as well as being compromised by exposure to the wearer's own perspiration. As a result a third, monolithic PU layer was added, denoted in the schematic (see right)as the inner of the "protection" layers. Finally either a loose fabric shell layer, or a bonded coating (typically a grid fabric, or occasionally a carbon layer as in Gore-Tex Paclite Shell) is added to the garment to protect the membrane sandwich. This final design has been criticized as offering greatly reduced performance and more marketing benefits than performance ones.[4]

    More recent fabrics such as eVent and Epic avoid the need for this inner PU coating[5] and have been shown to have higher breathability as a result, while still being rainproof


    HTH...
    Now that is a FULL explanation.

    Thank you.

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