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Thread: Basic pistol technique question

  1. #1
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    Basic pistol technique question

    It's apparent that modern doctrine supports the use of an isosceles style. For those who use that style, when you drive the pistol forward, do you fully straighten both arms outward or leave them 'bent'?

    On your reloads, do you keep the gun up and on target, or pull back slightly into a 'workspace'?

  2. #2
    VMI-MO Guest
    1) Fully extended outward. I am by no means hyperextending my elbows, but there is no noticeable bend in them

    2) Bring the weapon into your workspace. Pretend like you are reading the ingriedients on a soup can in a grocery store. Whre do you have it???? About 8"-10" in front of your face.


    PJ

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    Thanks much-

    Do you also change your visual focus to your weapon during the reload, or use your peripheral vision while keeping your eyes on the target? I'm of the opinion that peripheral vision would disappear under extreme duress, but the alternative of taking your eyes off the target sucks too. Is depending on muscle memory the solution?

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    Arms pushed out with a slight bend in the elbows

    Reloads and malfunction clearing are done in the work space.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VMI-MO View Post
    1) Fully extended outward. I am by no means hyperextending my elbows, but there is no noticeable bend in them

    2) Bring the weapon into your workspace. Pretend like you are reading the ingriedients on a soup can in a grocery store. Whre do you have it???? About 8"-10" in front of your face.


    PJ

    That is what I have been taught. One mistake I had been making, but was recently corrected on, was holding my pistol too low during reloads. You keep the pistol in front of your face, target level, so you are not caught looking down. The target is in your peripheral vision.

  6. #6
    VMI-MO Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by SpookyPistolero View Post
    Thanks much-

    Do you also change your visual focus to your weapon during the reload, or use your peripheral vision while keeping your eyes on the target? I'm of the opinion that peripheral vision would disappear under extreme duress, but the alternative of taking your eyes off the target sucks too. Is depending on muscle memory the solution?
    I find myself looking through the triggerwell and the area around it it at the threat.

    I primarily stay focused on the threat, until my hand is at the base of my mag well. At that time I throw a split glance down at where the magazine and magazine well are meeting. Once I have begun to insert the mag, my focus goes back to the threat.

    The threat will always be my main area of focus except for that split 10th of a second where my focus goes to the magwell even then it is still in my periphreals.

    Alot of new shooters love to do reloads bent over and looking down at their beltline, or they love to do weapons manipulations at full extension. Both of which are not good.


    PJ

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    Thanks for the clarifications, these were my feelings but I wanted to make sure they were proper, generally speaking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VMI-MO View Post
    I find myself looking through the triggerwell and the area around it it at the threat.

    I primarily stay focused on the threat, until my hand is at the base of my mag well. At that time I throw a split glance down at where the magazine and magazine well are meeting. Once I have begun to insert the mag, my focus goes back to the threat.

    The threat will always be my main area of focus except for that split 10th of a second where my focus goes to the magwell even then it is still in my periphreals.

    Alot of new shooters love to do reloads bent over and looking down at their beltline, or they love to do weapons manipulations at full extension. Both of which are not good.


    PJ
    I like this advice. Don't need to watch the mag all the way, only need to watch it enough to make sure its going where it needs to go.

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    Another question:

    When drawing your pistol, who favors driving the pistol straight towards the target( a-la Jeff Cooper), and who rotates it up and pointed at the target, and then drives it forward (a-la Clint Smith)?

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpookyPistolero View Post
    Another question:

    When drawing your pistol, who favors driving the pistol straight towards the target( a-la Jeff Cooper), and who rotates it up and pointed at the target, and then drives it forward (a-la Clint Smith)?
    The faster the sights are level in front of the eyes, the faster you will be able to make an aimed hit. So, if the need for a visual index exists, I want to draw my gun straight up to my eye-line with my muzzle a little high (pretty much inside the workspace).
    From there, the sights are aligned, the gun is pushed to full extension, and the trigger is pressed, simultaneously. The shortest distance between two points is a straight line, the key is knowing which two points to connect. It doesn't do much good to throw the gun from holster to full extension if you don't have the visual reference you need and are waiting on that reference to begin trigger press.
    Jack Leuba
    Director of Sales
    Knight's Armament Company
    jleuba@knightarmco.com

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